American College of Nurse-Midwives
Program Listing
Below is the program schedule for the ACNM's 63rd Annual Meeting & Exhibition.
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Saturday, May 19, 2018 8:00AM - 4:00PM
Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics (ALSO)®
Saturday, May 19, 8:00AM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Albert Runzel, CNM, MSN
Sherrie St. Clair, CNM


CEUs = 6
Rx =
Fee = $525.00
Student Fee = $525.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
A NEW one-day course format is available for Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics (ALSO®). This newly evolved course is an evidence-based interprofessional training program that prepares members of the entire maternity care team to better manage obstetric emergencies through teaching standardized approaches to care. This comprehensive course encourages team-based learning amongst physicians, residents, nurse-midwives, and registered nurses in order to improve patient safety and positively impact maternal outcomes. Learners will successfully complete required online course elements at their own pace prior to attending the one-day live portion of the course. The live portion of the course then provides multiple hands-on opportunities for learners to practice their skills and apply what they have learned. This is accomplished by rotating learners through interactive group case study workstations, in situ skills workstations, and simulated hands-on group testing scenarios throughout the day.



Exam Prep-Day 1
Saturday, May 19, 8:00AM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Missi Stec, CNM, DNP, APRN, FACNM, FAAN
Cara Busenhart, CNM, PhD


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $175.00
Student Fee = $175.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:

This session provides a comprehensive overview of the AMCB board examination for midwives.  The session is divided into 6 sections and offers both content and case based review for each section in a two-day format.  Students are offered over 400 questions for review within the workshop as all as access to educators and clinical experts to assist in their preparation. 

Objectives:
1. Student will demonstrate knowledge of the AMCB exam components and format.
2. Students will participate in comprehensive review of all content areas. (AP, IP, PP, NB, WH and Primary Care)
3. Students will use active learning strategies to complete cases studies in all test areas.
4. Student will identify weakness areas in order to best prepare for the AMCB exam.

Sunday, May 20, 2018 8:00AM - 12:00PM
Acupressure in Labor
Sunday, May 20, 8:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Judith Schlaeger, PhD, CNM, LAc
Jeanie Bussell, PhD, LAc


CEUs = 3.5
Rx =
Fee = $175.00
Student Fee = $100.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

For over two millennia, midwives in Asia have been using acupressure for the relief of labor pain. Other uses include labor augmentation, reducing nausea and vomiting, and rotating the fetus that presents with occiput posterior. This workshop will provide the CNM w ith the skills necessary to assess the laboring woman from a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective and to implement an acupressure prescription to facilitate her labor.

Objectives:
1. The participant should be able to describe the philosophical tenets and theories that Traditional Chinese Medicine is based upon
2. The participant should be able to state the indications for acupressure in  labor.
3. The participant should be able to define what is a pattern of disharmony and how to assess one.
4. The participant should be able to demonstrate the location of the acupuncture  points
5. The participant should begin to develop knowledge of point combinations (point prescriptions) to be usedin treating various labor problems



High and Dry: Pessary Fitting 101
Sunday, May 20, 8:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Noelle Borders, CNM, MSN
Laura Migliaccio, CNM
Lisa Bishop, CNM
Kara Barnes, MD


CEUs = 3.5
Rx = 210
Fee = $175.00
Student Fee = $100.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

Vaginal pessaries are a safe, cost effective, low tech, non-surgical treatment alternative for women with POP (pelvic organ prolapse) and UI (urinary incontinence). Studies show that up to 30% of women have POP and UI, and both are under reported and under treated. As the population of women grows, midwives can expand their knowledge, skills and services to provide pessaries for patients. This dynamic, interactive workshop workshop will provide an overview of POP and UI, and basic pessary use, fitting, and care. Attendees will practice evaluating and fitting women for pessaries using case studies and pelvic models in small groups.

Objectives:
1. Participants will acquire basic knowledge of pelvic floor disorders and the related anatomy and physiology, including the appropriate evaluation of women who might benefit from a pessary.
2. Participants will be able to evaluate women for pelvic organ prolapse (POP), specifically using the pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POP-Q) examination.
3. Participants will understand clinical evaluation and non-surgical management of urinary incontinence (UI), including behavioral modification, pessaries and medication, physical therapy and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS).
4. Participants will practice beginning skills in pessary fitting and care, with hands-on experience using foam models and the 8 most commonly used pessaries.



Increasing Access to Immediate Postpartum LARC: Clinical Update, Systems Solutions, and Hands-On IUD Insertion Training
Sunday, May 20, 8:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Helen Ryan, --None--
Mica Bumpus, MPA
Eve Espey, MD, MPH
Abigail Reese, CNM, MSN


CEUs = 3.5
Rx = 30
Fee = $175.00
Student Fee = $100.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

For midwives considering implementing an immediate postpartum LARC program in their practice/institution, this workshop will improve participants' knowledge of the safety, efficacy, and advantages of immediate postpartum LARC initiation, provide strategies to overcome systems-level barriers, and introduce and practice the technical skills needed for immediate postpartum IUD placement through hands-on training using models. This workshop will review current clinical recommendations from ACOG and the CDC and detail research findings regarding the safety and effectiveness of immediate postpartum LARC. Strategies to overcome systems-level barriers that limit access to immediate postpartum LARC will also be discussed, and implementation resources will be provided.

Objectives:
1. Upon completion of the workshop, participants will understand the role midwives can play in the provision of immediate postpartum LARC
2. Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to describe the efficacy and safety of immediate postpartum initiation of IUDs and the contraceptive implant based on current clinical recommendations
3. Upon completion of the workshop, participants will understand systemic and financial barriers to immediate postpartum LARC provision and list strategies to overcome them, including those specific to midwifery practice
4. Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to demonstrate immediate postpartum IUD insertion skills using Mama-U uterus models after individualized instruction
5. Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to identify resources available to support implementation of immediate postpartum LARC



Mentoring Midwives: Our Future is in Our Hands
Sunday, May 20, 8:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Ginger Breedlove, CNM, PhD, FACNM

CEUs = 3.5
Rx =
Fee = $175.00
Student Fee = $100.00
Track Identifiers: Leadership
Session Description:
Although one-to-one mentoring in professional leadership development is different than mentoring midwives’ entrée into practice, principles that lead to successful mentoring are similar. Midwifery advancement in profession and practice is challenged by many factors, including: lack of diversity in leadership; uncertainty in how to attain leadership positions within the association; absence of a formal mentoring program within the association or workplace compared to other disciplines; and, graduates’ preparedness for first job often accompanied with low confidence. This workshop will provide didactic and experiential components found in successful mentoring relationships that contribute to facilitating mentee’s goals, leadership aspirations, and/or entrée into the profession. Whether you are interested in mentoring a colleague’s advancement in ACNM, seeking a mentor relationship, or wish to learn ways to establish an ‘entry to practice’ mentoring program, research suggests common components leading to desired outcomes. We can learn from research conducted by our midwifery colleagues in the UK, Australia, and New Zealand, as well as professional associations in the US that have implemented mentoring and leadership programs to ensure our profession grows, is professionally satisfying, and represents the diversity of American society.
Objectives:
1. Describe the value of a mentoring relationship or program including the critical need for supporting new and emerging Midwives into the profession and practice
2. Identify research based recommendations of highly functioning and successful mentoring programs
3. List steps to begin a personalized or group mentoring program that can be implemented with low cost and high value



Midwifery Management of Common Primary Care and Gynecological Concerns Impacting Women Over Age 40
Sunday, May 20, 8:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Desireé Clement, DNP, APRN, CNM, FNP-BC

CEUs = 3.5
Rx =
Fee = $175.00
Student Fee = $100.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This workshop will combine both lecture, case studies, and interactive case management discussion on potential common primary care and gynecology complaints of women over age 40 presenting for midwifery care. Self-awareness and guidance of a midwife’s ability to integrate knowledge and clinical application for the care management of women as they begin to age is important. Midwifery scope of practice includes primary care management along with gynecology. Topics to include overview of pelvic pain and menstrual complaint management, breast complaints, changes in sexual response, screening for female genitourinary complaints and cancers of the female organs, and menopausal management



Pharmacology : Update for women's Health Hot Topic of Today
Sunday, May 20, 8:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Bridget Howard, CNM, MSN

CEUs = 3.5
Rx = 240
Fee = $175.00
Student Fee = $100.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This workshop will present current issues of pharmacological agents prescribed for women focusing on updates and impacts for women;s health in primary care and pregnancy.. Information will also be presented addressing some of the impacts of prescribed agent effectiveness for women of differing ethnicities.



Preparing Future Generations: A Workshop for Midwives Working as Educators in Midwifery, Medicine, and Nursing
Sunday, May 20, 8:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Judy Lazarus, CNM DNP
Kristin Effland, MA, CPM


CEUs = 3.5
Rx =
Fee = $25.00
Student Fee = $25.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
This free workshop, offered by the Midwifery Educators section of the DOE, is designed for educators and preceptors of students in midwifery, nursing, medical school and residency. This half-day workshop will be our 4th annual workshop at the ACNM Annual Meeting. We will start with a 1.75-hour session on strategies for implementation of anti-racism and equity content in the classroom and clinical settings. Next, we will break out into special interest sessions on topics pertaining to innovation and strategies in didactic education and precepting. Finally, we will return to a general session on successful models of interprofessional clinical education..
Objectives:
1. Describe strategies to support diversity in the education of nursing, medical and midwifery students and residents
2. Identify barriers faced by students from diverse backgrounds in the midwifery, nursing and medical education systems
3. Identify curricular and clinical education strategies to integrate the midwifery model of care into nursing, midwifery and medical education.
4. Discuss the key points of the midwifery model of care and how those can be integrated into teaching moments with studentsVerbalize understanding of models of excellence in interprofessional education in women’s health
5. Verbalize understanding of models of excellence in interprofessional education in women’s health
6. Analyze strategies for integrating interprofessional education into midwifery, nursing, and medical education and clinical care



Scents and Sensibility: Clinical Aromatherapy in Midwifery Practice
Sunday, May 20, 8:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Annie Massed, CNM, MPH Assistant Professor Boston University Medical Center

CEUs = 3.5
Rx = 15
Fee = $175.00
Student Fee = $100.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Education, Miscellaneous
Session Description:
This introductory Aromatherapy Workshop will make sense out of Clinical Aromatherapy. This will be an interactive learning experience. A brief historical review of essential oils as a healing methodology and the most recent renaissance of Aromatherapy in practice will be discussed. Attendees will learn how essential oils are made, how they are absorbed and excreted in the body, and their affects on physical and emotional well being. Attendees will have the opportunity to participate in safe application. Five important essential oils related to Women's Health will be presented. Current research will be cited for each of the oils presented. Challenges in integrating aromatherapy into practice will be discussed and an aromatherapy guideline utilized in an academic midwifery practice will be presented. Join me and indulge your senses and make sense out of this popular complimentary modality in which we as midwives can comfortably use in our practice.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant should be able to appreciate the history of essential oil and how it relates to our profession and current day midwifery practice
2. At the end of the session the participant should be able to define aromatherapy, cite the benefits and limitations of essential oil utilization, and discuss the pharmacokinetics of essential oils
3. At the end of the session the participant should be able to demonstrate safe application of essential oils
4. At the end of the session the participant should be able to demonstrate the importance of chemical make up of 5 individual oils and it's relationship to their functional properties.
5. At the end of the session the participant should be able to cite studies specific to women's health and the use of essential oils.
6. At the end of the session the participant should be able to develop safe Aromatherapy guidelines within a health care system.



What Happens When a Lawsuit Goes to Trial
Sunday, May 20, 8:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Michelle Palmer, CNM, MSN
Michelle Collins, PhD, CNM, FACNM, FAAN
Carolyn Gegor, CNM, MS
Mamie Guidera, CNM, MSN, FACNM


CEUs = 3.5
Rx =
Fee = $50.00
Student Fee = $25.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Education
Session Description:

Understanding the litigation process is greatly beneficial to the practicing midwife. As interprofessional healthcare takes holds in the birth arena, midwives need to better understand the interface of clinical care with legal processes. This understanding becomes critical in the event of an adverse outcome resulting in litigation occurs. A multi-media presentation with the use of a mock trial will engage the audience in understanding legal terms and principles involved with litigation.; Pearls for prevention and risk reduction will be reviewed.

Objectives:
1. Understand the basic principles of the process of litigation from deposition to trial.
2. Articulate strategies for risk reduction during the litigation process
3. Develop multiple risk management strategies out of the mock trial, multi-media presentation and debrief process.
4. Devise proactive plan for support during litigation and coping strategies in continued practice. (thinking of having midwife speak of how you pick up the pieces after all is said and done….)
5. Accrue 4 hours of Risk Management Education required of (some) malpractice providers.

Sunday, May 20, 2018 8:00AM - 4:00PM
Accreditation Commission for Midwifery Education (ACME): Maximizing Educational Quality through the ACME Criteria
Sunday, May 20, 8:00AM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Melissa Avery, PhD, CNM, FACNM, FAAN
Heather Maurer, MA
Maryann Long, PhD, CNM


CEUs = 7.0
Rx =
Fee = $275.00
Student Fee = $275.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
The process of accreditation of midwifery education programs is becoming more complex. Often program directors and faculty have not had experience in preparing for the accreditation process or an understanding on compliance requirements year to year. This workshop is designed to provide attendees with all of the nuts and bolts of ACME accreditation. It will also provide up-to-date information on writing the Self-Evaluation Report (SER) and preparing for a site visit. Attendees will actively participate in activities designed to prepare them for a successful accreditation process and annual monitoring reports during the accreditation period. Information presented will also be relevant for those planning to start a new midwifery education program and for those preparing for the pre-accreditation process. This workshop is highly recommend for all new program directors. For midwifery programs who are up for review in the next one to three years, this would be an excellent workshop to attend and learn how to prepare and organize for your review and site visit.



Introduction to OB GYN Ultrasound Hands-On Workshop- Didactic Session
Sunday, May 20, 8:00AM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Julie Gaston, BS, RDMS, RVT

CEUs = 4
Rx =
Fee = $495.00
Student Fee = $495.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Sonosession in partnership with ACNM is proud to offer a hands-on ultrasound workshop on Sunday May 20, 2018 at The ACNM 63rd Annual Meeting. This one day workshop begins with lecture, a hands-on scanning demonstration, and a question and answer segment. Each participant will then have a 2 hour live scanning opportunity in our hands-on session. There will be various stations set up that focus on a variety of scanning skills including transvaginal, CRL measurements, assessment of ovaries and endometrium, IUD evaluation, and third trimester scanning including AFI, fetal lie, placental location and cervical length. Each participant will rotate through 2 stations. The stations are strategically selected based on your learning objectives and scanning experience. Each participant will also have access to Sonosession’s online learning platform to watch lectures and videos prior to the meeting in preparation for the hands on scanning session. Space is limited.



Perineal Repair Update:  A Suturing Workshop
Sunday, May 20, 8:00AM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Sarah Smith, CNM, DNP
Julie Daniels, CNM, DNP
Eileen Thrower, CNM, PhD
Victoria Burslem, MSN, CNM
Jane Houston, DNP, CNM
Rebecca Faye, DNP, CNM
Mickey Gillmor, CNM, MN
Lisa Huckaby, DNP, CNM


CEUs = 7.0
Rx =
Fee = $275.00
Student Fee = $150.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

This is a hands on workshop designed for new graduates or seasoned CNMs/CMs needing to brush up on suturing skills.  During the workshop perineal anatomy and indications for repair, administration of local anesthesia, and post-repair assessment will be discussed while maintaining a woman's dignity.  Skills to be taught and practiced include one handed knot tying, instrument tie, repair of second degree perineal laceration/episiotomy, and first degree labial laceration utilizing the most recent evidence.

Objectives:
1. At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to describe perineal anatomy with particular detail of the perineal body and discuss approaches for preserving perineal integrity during childbirth.
2. At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to define classifications of perineal lacerations, identify and discuss two indications for surgical repair of perineal trauma, and explain two types of episiotomy including indications for as well as risks and benefits associated with each.
3. At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to discuss common types of local anesthesia for repair of perineal trauma, simulate infiltration of local anesthetic for perineal repair, demonstrate basic surgical skills including aseptic technique, handling surgical instruments, positioning and guarding needles, and choose appropriate suture and needle for laceration type.
4. At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to perform one-handed and instrument ties and examine the perineum/vagina to identify type and extent of laceration.
5. At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to perform repair of second degree perineal laceration utilizing continuous suturing technique on high-fidelity model and demonstrate repair of first degree labial lacerations on high-fidelity model.
6. At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to describe post-repair assessment of perineal hemostasis and approximation and surgical instruments and sponges and review methods for maintaining the woman’s dignity and obtaining informed co

Sunday, May 20, 2018 1:00PM - 3:00PM
Being Effective in Global Midwifery: Addressing Power and Cultural Bias to Build Bidirectional and Reciprocal Relationships for Learning
Sunday, May 20, 1:00PM - 3:00PM
Presented by:
Eileen Stuart-Shor, PhD, ANP-BC, FAAN
Robyn Churchill, CNM, MSN
Linda Jacobsen, CNM, FNP, MPH


CEUs = 4
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education, Global Midwifery, Racism and Disparities
Session Description:

US midwives work increasingly in international settings, and in the US with women from many cultures. An effective midwife, educator or program director must understand and address power dynamics and cultural biases to form two-way learning and sharing, This interactive workshop will explore challenges of poorly-resourced health systems, to identify risks of unequitable global partnerships, and to compare strategies to address implicit bias and power imbalances. Addressing structural bias and unintentional paternalism within the US will also be discussed. The session will end with a discussion of identified themes and their impact on midwives’ work in any setting.

Objectives:
1. Identify the major health challenges facing women of childbearing age in low resource settings.
2. Describe attributes of partnerships which promote reciprocity and bidirectional benefits and the risks of poorly constructed global partnerships
3. Identify 3 challenges facing midwives who practice clinically in transnational low resource settings
4. Compare and contrast effective strategies to address implicit/unconscious bias, north-south imbalance in power, and conflicting cultural values.
5. Describe cultural humility and its importance in working internationally.
6. Identify three ways each participant can use cultural humility in his/her own practice in the US or internationally

Sunday, May 20, 2018 1:00PM - 5:00PM
Diagnosis and Management of Sexual Pain in Women: An Innovative Collaboration Between a Midwife and a Physical Therapist
Sunday, May 20, 1:00PM - 5:00PM
Presented by:
Kathy Herron, CNM, MS
Melissa Keras-Donaghy, PT, DPT, WCS, CLT-LANA


CEUs = 3.5
Rx = 30
Fee = $175.00
Student Fee = $100.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:

Sexual pain is the most difficult of the sexual dysfunctions to diagnose and treat. Midwives are often the first providers that patients confide in, yet many midwives don't feel qualified to deal with this problem. This workshop will go way beyond the basics to give midwives the information, tools, and resources to begin to manage sexual pain patients. Etiologies, history taking, examinations, testing, and treatments will be covered in detail. Learn how a midwife and a pelvic floor physical therapist work together to help these women, and leave with a renewed confidence in your ability to help them as well.




Elective Newborn Circumcision: Skills for Nurse Midwives.
Sunday, May 20, 1:00PM - 5:00PM
Presented by:
Michelle Drew, DNP, MPH, CNM, FNP-C
Theresa Coley-Kouadio, CNM, MSN


CEUs = 3.5
Rx = 30
Fee = $175.00
Student Fee = $100.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Midwifery Matters - Business
Session Description:
As providers competent to care for well infant newborns, and who may desire to work in critical healthcare shortage areas, it is important that nurse midwives feel educated and empowered to provide comprehensive care for women and newborns including being willing and able to give parents of newborn boys comprehensive education on the risks, benefits, and alternatives to newborn male circumcision. The American Academy of Pediatrics current position is that the benefits of newborn circumcision outweighs the risks. The CDC considers male circumcision and important health measure.Studies have shown that circumcision can reduce urinary tract infections in the first year of life and may reduce the transmission of STI's in adult life. Surveillance by the CDC shows that the majority of parents in the United States still choose to circumcision for their sons and it is the overwhelming choice among some ethnic and cultural groups such as our African American clients and among the Muslim community, it is preferred that male infants be circumcised as soon as possible In many health systems it is the responsibility of the obstetric or midwife providers and in areas of health professional shortage there may be no family practice or pediatric provider who routinely performs newborn male circumcision. The purpose of this session is to provide didactic education and hands on simulation on the risks benefits and alternatives to male circumcision; how to provide informed consent and practice on performing the procedure for newborn male circumcision using both the Gomco and Mogen clamps.
Objectives:
1. After the workshop the attendee will be able to provide comprehensive education to the parents of baby boys on the risks, benefits, and alternatives to newborn circumcision and explain potential complications of newvborn circumcision to be able to provide
2. After the workshop the attendee with be able to list and identify contraindications to circumcision
3. After attending the workshop the attendee will be able to describe the process for preparing the newborn for circumcision including positioning, swaddling for warmth and comfort and administration of oral 24% sucrose and water solution for analgesia by a nursing partner before beginning the circumcision procedure.
4. After the workshop the attendee will be able to demonstrate the skills of the newborn circumcision procedure using the Gomco Clamp technique
5. After the workshop the attendee will be able to demonstrate the newborn male circumcision using the Mogen clamp technique
6. After the workshop the attendee will be able to demonstrate and describe appropriate after care of the circumcised penis to the parents or newborns.



Incorporating Endometrial Biopsy into Clinical Management of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding
Sunday, May 20, 1:00PM - 5:00PM
Presented by:
Ami Goldstein, CNM, FNP, MSN

CEUs = 3.5
Rx = 20
Fee = $175.00
Student Fee = $100.00
Session Description:

Endometrial biopsy is an important skill for midwives providing gynecological care. Come and learn this useful practice technique. It is part of the care of women with abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB). This session will provide the foundation of understanding of the common causes of AUB and practical next steps in evaluation and management. There will be opportunity to practice endometrial biopsy and discussion of how to incorporate it into daily clinical practice. 


Sunday, May 20, 2018 3:00PM - 4:00PM
I Was Satisfied with the Care Because They Didn't Beat Me: A Panel Discussion on Respectful Maternity Care and Mistreatment of Women in Childbirth around the Globe
Sunday, May 20, 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Michelle Dynes, CNM, MSN, MPH, RN, PhD
Nicole Warren, CNM, MPH, PhD
Mary Ellen Stanton, CNM, MSN, FACNM
Deborah Armbruster, CNM, MPH, FACNM
Saraswathi Vedam, RM, FACNM, MSN, Sci D(hc)


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:

Lack of respectful maternity care (RMC) is increasingly recognized as a human rights issue and a key deterrent to women seeking facility-based deliveries. This panel will provide an overview of the current literature and evidence on RMC and the influence of disrespectful and abusive care on women's birth experiences. Panelists will share information on RMC qualitative and quantitative research and programmatic work from across the globe. The discussion will include a review of current efforts to move the scientific work forward through development of conceptual models of RMC, improved measurement tools, clinical interventions, and global advocacy strategies.

Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, the participants will be able to list three factors that challenge assessment of prevalence and measurement of respectful maternity care (RMC).
2. At the end of the session, the participants will be able to explain the importance of RMC research for reducing maternal and newborn mortality.
3. At the end of the session, the participants will be able to identify at least one global advocacy platform focused on improving women's access to RMC.
4. At the end of the session, the participants will be able to name at least two of the seven articles of the White Ribbon Alliance Charter for Respectful Maternity Care.
5. At the end of the session, the participants will be able to identify three of the WHO Standards for Quality Maternity Care that relate to RMC.



Prenatal Aspirin Intervention to Reduce Negative Maternal and Fetal Outcomes in At Risk Women; the Role of the Midwife
Sunday, May 20, 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Courtney Steer-Massaro, CNM, FNP-C, MPH, RN

CEUs = 1
Rx = 10
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

Preeclampsia affects 3.8% of births in the US, and is the leading cause of iatrogenic preterm births. The USPSTF advocated for the initiation of low-dose aspirin use in women at-risk for hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Boston Medical Center is a tertiary care, safety-net hospital in Boston, MA, with many patients at-risk for hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. We conducted an implementation study to increase provider screening for, and prescribing of, prenatal (low-dose) aspirin for high risk patients. Screening, and if needed prescribing aspirin, is an important area of prenatal care where midwives can have lasting influences on their patient's pregnancy outcomes.

Objectives:
1. At the end of the session participants will be able to discuss the negative effects of hypertensive diseases of pregnancy and IUGR.
2. At the end of the session participants will be be able to summarize the USTSPF's recommendation for prevention of hypertensive complications in pregnancy.
3. At the end of the session participants will be able to list 8 risk factors (high or medium) for women at risk for hypertensive complications in pregnancy.
4. At the end of the session participants will be able to describe aspirin's mechanism of action in helping to prevent pre-eclampsia and the ideal timing for administration.
5. At the end of the session participants will be able to identify barriers to at-risk women being prescribed PNA.
6. At the end of the session participants will be able to describe how they will assess PNA screening in their practice, and expand it to at-risk women if needed.

Sunday, May 20, 2018 3:00PM - 5:00PM
International Disaster Response for Midwives: The Nuts and Bolts, Brass Tacks, and Nitty-Gritty
Sunday, May 20, 3:00PM - 5:00PM
Presented by:
Karen Hays, CNM, ARNP, DNP
Robbie Prepas, CNM, JD


CEUs = 1.0
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:

Is disaster response right for you? The ACNM Disaster Preparedness and Response Caucus offers this session for midwives who are thinking about volunteering for humanitarian disaster response. Participating as a volunteer health care provider in emergency settings requires unique knowledge, capabilities, problem-solving skills, cross-cultural competencies, and reflective self-awareness. The goal of this interactive session is to introduce midwives to the scope of competencies needed to effectively protect and care for women and young infants during chaotic situations such as natural disasters and other crises such as refugee situations. Midwives of all levels of experience (including students) are welcome.

Objectives:
1. Compare and contrast the different types of disasters and social emergencies, including how the preparation-response-recovery cycle is unique to each.
2. Identify the vulnerabilities and needs of women and young infants in humanitarian crisis situations that influence the priorities for acute and long-term health care service provision, and how the midwife’s scope of practice is appropriate for many important services in crisis settings.
3. Identify options for health care providers to volunteer to provide clinical services during international disasters and humanitarian crises, and discuss disaster-response organizational concepts, ‘crisis’ standards of care, and legal issues (licensing, liability, scope of practice, etc.) that are unique to providing care in emergency settings.
4. Discuss the considerations a midwife should address before deployment to a disaster zone that ensure appropriate and effective preparation for participation in disaster response.
5. Through case studies and small group work, identify important issues and creatively problem-solve various realities of working as a midwife in low-resource and chaotic environments, including but not limited to: improvising clinical organization and provision, coping with limitations of human and material resources, recognizing security concerns, addressing cross-cultural conundrums, working with local clinicians and community members, and taking care of oneself.

Sunday, May 20, 2018 4:15PM - 5:15PM
Curriculum Tools for Discussing Race and Racism in Midwifery
Sunday, May 20, 4:15PM - 5:15PM
Presented by:
Leandra Santos, CNM, MSN
Brittany Edwards, BSN, SNM


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Racism and Disparities
Session Description:

This presentation will discuss the state of race and racism discussion in midwifery classrooms today. It will also identify strategies to promote anti-racist content throughout the midwifery curriculum by using the following as educational frameworks: “structural competency”, “critical race theory”, and "reproductive justice." Other strategies will be discussed like “curriculum threading” of race and racism to midwifery curriculum and utilizing a “strengths-based” approach to education to promoting positive learning experiences for students of color.

Objectives:
1. Identify strategies to promote anti-racist content throughout the midwifery curriculum.
2. Describe and apply these educational frameworks: “structural competency”, “critical race theory”, and "reproductive justice" to midwifery curriculum.
3. Apply “curriculum threading” of race and racism to midwifery curriculum.
4. Utilize a “strengths-based” approach to education while promoting positive learning experiences for students of color.



Physiology Based Interpretation of Fetal Heart Rate Patterns in Labor: Review of a New Approach
Sunday, May 20, 4:15PM - 5:15PM
Presented by:
Dominique Waldau, RM (UK), RN, MSN, CNM

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

Current electronic fetal monitoring guidelines are based on pattern recognition and the classification of strips into a three-tier system that does not incorporate the wider clinical picture and fetal physiology. A group of providers at St Georges Hospital of London has developed an alternative EFM interpretation approach that looks at fetal physiology and compensatory responses to hypoxic stress and how this is reflected in fetal heart rate tracings. This helps practitioners recognize babies who are stressed, but compensating well versus babies who are stressed and decompensating. Their approach has significantly reduced their intrapartum emergency c-section rates and improved neonatal outcomes.

Objectives:
1. Participants will learn about some of the issues with current EFM interpretation guidelines. One of the problems with current EFM guidelines is that they are based on pattern recognition and the classification of strips into a three-tier system that does not take into consideration fetal physiology and the wider clinical picture.
2. Participants will learn about a novel EFM interpretation approach that looks at fetal physiology and compensatory responses to hypoxic stress and how this is reflected in fetal heart rate tracings. This helps practitioners recognize babies who are stressed, but compensating well versus babies who are stressed and decompensating. This approach has been successfully used in St. Georges hospital of London and has significantly reduced their EFM false positive rates and the resulting intrapartum interventions.
3. Participants will learn how to analyze EFM pattern evolution over time with special attention given to recognizing the different types of intrapartum hypoxia, including acute, subacute and slowly evolving hypoxia.  Non hypoxic causes of fetal injury will also be discussed.
4. Participants will learn how to apply physiology based EFM knowledge in order to better manage labors and, subsequently, improve fetal and maternal outcomes.
5. Participants will be introduced to fetal ECG (ST analysis) and it's potential use as an adjunct to electronic fetal monitoring.



Preeclampsia Primer: What's old, what's new, and must knows for dealing with preeclampsia
Sunday, May 20, 4:15PM - 5:15PM
Presented by:
Diane Folk, CNM, DNP

CEUs = 1
Rx = 10
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

Experienced, as well as new, midwives will care for women with preeclampsia. Current information regarding preeclampsia, recently updated severe acute hypertension treatment guidelines, and considerations for birth timing is essential for midwives. This presentation will explore these topics, why maternal morbidity and mortality due to preeclampsia continues to be a problem, and what we can do to reduce these complications.

Objectives:
1. At the conclusion of this presentation, the attendee will be able to: 1. Define preeclampsia and related disorders
2. 2. Describe the current incidence of preeclampsia
3. 3. Review the diagnostic evaluation for preeclampsia both with and without severe features
4. 4. Discuss the treatment of preeclampsia both with and without severe features
5. 5. Describe recommended timing of birth for preeclampsia with and without severe features
6. 6. Outline steps to reduce complications of preeclampsia



There is No Such Thing as Cord Blood. Shifting the Paradigm.
Sunday, May 20, 4:15PM - 5:15PM
Presented by:
Mayri Leslie, EdD, CNM, MSN, FACNM

CEUs = 1
Rx = 5
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

Substantial evidence supports the importance of delaying cord clamping to allow for a more complete placental transfusion after birth. However, the existence of evidence does not easily result in changing practice. A falsehood exists in the dominant paradigm of maternity care - the myth of "cord blood" as an entity. This enables the justification of inappropriate care and misinforms parents on the decisions they make on their newborn's behalf. This session will explore this critical issue and engage participants in creating a new paradigm: It's the Baby's Blood.

Objectives:
1. Clearly explain the physiology of placental transfer of blood in term and preterm newborns.
2. Discuss the 'myth of cord blood' as a separate entity from the baby's blood and the impact of this view on caregivers and families.
3. Identify 4 strategies to help shift the paradigm to an understanding of baby's blood and it's importance.
4. Explain the nature of paradigm shifts and how they occur.



Tools & Examples for Promoting Equity in Midwifery Education and Training: Towards Meaningful Diversity and Inclusion
Sunday, May 20, 4:15PM - 5:15PM
Presented by:
Kristin Effland, MA, CPM

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education, Leadership, Racism and Disparities
Session Description:

Provide your students who are underrepresented in midwifery with the opportunity to demonstrate resilience by promoting equity in your midwifery school and clinic environment. Come learn more about how midwifery educators and administrators use the tools and examples featured on the web-based resource www.equitymidwifery.org to take action to promote an equity focus at their schools and in their clinics. Join this interactive and engaging session to learn more about how to create equity-focused learning environments that improve student experiences and success rates while better preparing all students to provide culturally humble and sensitive care to diverse childbearing persons.

Objectives:
1. Describe how structural and institutional racism and microaggressions impact the lives of underrepresented midwifery students, adding stressors and disparities to the usual demanding educational challenges.
2. Identify how preceptors, faculty, administrators and institutions can enable their students (especially those who are underrepresented in midwifery) to demonstrate resilience by promoting equity in midwifery school and clinic environments.
3. Demonstrate how an equity focus in education takes power and privilege into account so that school and clinic climates can better support the learning of all students.
4. Outline how equity-focused learning environments improve student experiences and success rates, and better prepare all students to provide culturally humble and sensitive care to diverse childbearing persons.
5. Explain how midwifery educators and administrators can use the tools and examples featured on the web-based resource www.equitymidwifery.org to take action to promote an equity focus at their schools and in their clinics.



Who's Caring for the Midwife? Compassion and Caregiver Fatigue in the Setting of Secondary Traumatic Stress
Sunday, May 20, 4:15PM - 5:15PM
Presented by:
Michelle Collins, PhD, CNM, FACNM, FAAN
Edith Cloyd, JD, MSN, RN, PMHNP-BC


CEUs = 1
Rx = 20
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
Caring for women is a duty germane to the profession of midwifery that comes with a price. “Compassion fatigue” and “secondary traumatic stress” are real concerns for caregivers who care for others experiencing trauma or pain, emotional or physical. Though empathy is a trait that midwives rely upon in their daily practice, it also sets them up for the development of secondary traumatic stress and compassion fatigue. Professional burnout, emotional and physical exhaustion (with accompanying untoward physical effects), a change in worldview and self, even the eventual inability to provide the empathy required by the midwife are all potential adverse effects as well as depression and stress related illness. In an era where more midwives are necessary to meet market demands, we must be cognizant of the reasons that may cause existing midwives to burnout and leave the profession. This presentation will examine the current state of the workforce, burnout rates and causes, the concepts of compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress as they relate to the midwifery profession, and strategies to deal with these entities including both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic. A certified nurse-midwife, therapist whose expertise is in trauma and post-traumatic stress disorders, and a psychiatric/mental health nurse practitioner team up to deliver this comprehensive presentation.
Objectives:
1. At the conclusion of this presentation, the attendee will be able to discuss the average length of a midwifery career and reasons for professional burnout and compassion fatigue.
2. At the conclusion of this presentation, the attendee will be able to define the concepts of compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress as they relate to the profession of midwifery.
3. At the conclusion of this presentation, the attendee will be able to outline strategies to help prevent provider burnout and compassion fatigue to include both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic modalities.

Sunday, May 20, 2018 5:30PM - 6:30PM
A tale of two births: newborn resuscitation and the use of CPAP in the out-of-hospital setting
Sunday, May 20, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Margaret Buxton, CNM, MSN, DNP

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Current neonatal resuscitation guidelines include the use of CPAP in the delivery room for respiratory stabilization in neonates. In this presentation we will discuss the unique challenges related to neonatal resuscitation in the home and birth center. We will review the use of CPAP in the out-of-hospital setting via case presentation and discussion of a unique t-piece resuscitator that is applicable to home and birth center settings.
Objectives:
1. By the end of the session the participant should be able to explain the unique challenges related to neonatal resuscitation in the out-of-hospital setting.
2. By the end of the session the participant should understand the physiologic benefits of CPAP in resuscitation.
3. By the end of the session the participant should develop understanding about the specific use of CPAP in home/birth center settings.
4. By the end of the session the participant should be able to utilize knowledge about portable CPAP to improve neonatal outcomes in the out-of-hospital setting.



ACNM-ACOG Maternity Care Education and Practice Redesign: Preparing midwives and obstetrician-gynecologists for the future
Sunday, May 20, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Melissa Avery, PhD, CNM, FACNM, FAAN
Elaine Germano, CNM, DRPH, FACNM
Phillip Rauk, MD, FACOG


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:

This ACNM-ACOG IPE project aims to develop a model IPE curriculum to improve US maternity outcomes and increase the workforce. Midwifery education and ob-gyn residency programs at four demonstration sites are working together to develop and implement a set of core IPE modules, plus simulation and clinical learning opportunities based on principles established by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative and ACOG’s Collaboration in Practice: Implementing Team-Based Care. Methods to increase the number of midwifery students in IPE settings are being explored. Presenters will discuss development at the four demonstration sites, including challenges to implementation and how these are being addressed.

Objectives:
1. Learners will identify the projected maternity care workforce shortages and the need to educate more midwives.
2. Learners will describe the four Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (from the Interprofessional Education Collaborative or IPEC), the Guiding Principles from the ACOG Task Force on Collaborative Practice, and the Key Principles of TeamSTEPPS.
3. Learners will describe the IPE curriculum innovations developed and implemented by the four demonstration sites.
4. Learners will identify barriers and solutions to implementing an IPE curriculum for midwifery students and ob-gyn residents and how such a curriculum could be implemented at their sites.



Implementing an Internet-based Decision in Aid in Ethically Diverse Pregnancy Care Settings: Reducing Disparities through Shared Decision Making about Birth after Cesarean
Sunday, May 20, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Allison Shorten

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
No description available at time of publication



Induction of Labor:  Are you Choosing the Best Techniques and Medications for Success?  A Review of New Evidence, with Special Emphasis on Labor Induction in Women who are Obese
Sunday, May 20, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Nicole Carlson, CNM, PhD
Jessica Ellis, CNM


CEUs = 1
Rx = 30
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

Induction of labor is an increasingly common procedure among women. When done sub-optimally, induction can increase women’s risk for unplanned cesarean delivery, infection, and other poor maternal and neonatal outcomes.  Women who are obese are at special risk for these and other poor outcomes following labor induction.  This session will review new evidence on induction, induction medications and protocols, and how midwives can change their practice to offer all women the best chance of having a successful and low(er) intervention induction.  We will also offer specific suggestions on adapting induction protocols for the unique physiology of women who are obese.

Objectives:
1. At end of session, participants will better understand recent evidence controversies on the use and sequelae of labor induction. (15 min)
2. At end of this session, participants will understand the newest evidence on cervical ripening for term labor induction. (10 min)
3. This session will assist participants to demonstrate better understanding of the differential use and effectiveness of common labor induction interventions. (10 min)
4. By the end of this session, participants will better understand how labor progresses differently for each woman following during labor induction.
5. At the end of this session, participants should be able to demonstrate a better understanding of evidence-based recommendations for labor induction among women who are obese.



Interprofessional Communication and Collaboration During Emergent Birth Center Transfers: A Quality Improvement Pilot Project
Sunday, May 20, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Lauren Olvera, CNM, DNP

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education, Midwifery Matters - Business, Midwifery Matters - Public Perception
Session Description:
Provision of high-quality, safe care during out-of-hospital perinatal emergencies necessitating transfer to the hospital setting requires seamless coordination and efficient communication among providers across professions. Optimal perinatal outcomes during emergent transfers depend on excellent interprofessional communication and collaboration under pressure. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to implement interprofessional emergent birth center transfer mock drills at a freestanding birth center.
Objectives:
1. Discuss the importance of developing clearly defined emergent transfer protocols for the out of hospital (OOH) birth setting.
2. Identify challenges and barriers to safe and effective emergent transfer from the OOH birth setting to hospital setting.
3. Discuss advantages of involving interprofessional healthcare team members in quality improvement initiatives.
4. Discuss methods to successfully gain buy-in from members of collaborating healthcare professions.
5. Discuss utilization of PDSA cycles to quickly implement, evaluate, and adapt processes to effect rapid process improvement
6. Identify specific tools that aid interprofessional communication during emergent transfers from the OOH birth setting.



Measuring Midwives' Perception of their Practice Environment: Creation of the Midwifery Practice Climate Scale
Sunday, May 20, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Elisabeth Thumm, PhD, CNM, MBA

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Leadership
Session Description:

The Midwifery Practice Climate Scale was developed to accurately measure how supported a certified nurse-midwife/certified midwife feels in the work environment. This session will discuss the development of the scale, including the content validity, internal consistency, structural validity, divergent validity, and convergent validity using multiple samples over the course of 3 years. We will discuss item creation, item reduction, the final structure of the scale, and how to use the scale in clinical practice.




Optimizing Access and Interprofessional Collaboration: The Transition Between a Home Birth Setting to a Hospital Setting
Sunday, May 20, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Cara Busenhart, CNM, PhD
Cheryl Gates, CPM


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Public Perception
Session Description:

This community-wide project aimed to develop best practice guidelines for a metropolitan area to facilitate the transition between a planned home birth setting into the hospital setting. Barrier-free prenatal care and safe birth options that meet women's needs were identified as a need for the community. Current guidelines were unclear or not universally accepted among women's health professionals, necessitating the need for consensus-building and buy-in. This project came from a collaboration between a CNM, CPM, and MFM, who then included stakeholders throughout the community in an iterative process of developing best practice guidelines and garnering buy-in from the community.

Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to describe how consensus was gained for development of best practice guidelines.
2. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to identify the Best Practice Guidelines: Transfer from Planned Home Birth to Hospital from the Home Birth Summit.
3. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to discuss methods for stakeholder buy-in with policy change in the community.



The Silent Maternal Mortality? Lifetime Primary Care for Women with Diabetes, Hypertension or Cardiovascular Disease as a Result of Pregnancy
Sunday, May 20, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Mayri Leslie, EdD, CNM, MSN, FACNM

CEUs = 1
Rx = 20
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

Maternal mortality occurs well beyond the period around birth. Consider the lifelong consequences of pregnancy disorders that lead to diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease in the duration of a woman's life. Mothers who experience hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are at significant risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality from the postpartum period to decades later. This session discusses teaching, follow-through and existing standards and guidelines for these women. we serve. 

Objectives:
1. Explain possible pathophysiology and eitiology of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease which continue in a woman's life as a result of disorders in pregnancy.
2. Describe a follow-through plan of care, based on existing clinical guidelines, for maternal chronic disease as a result of pregnancy.
3. List 3 adverse outcomes a mother may have after diabetes or cardiovascular disorders in pregnancy.
4. Identify 3 barriers to implementing evidence-based care of women with pregnancy-related chronic disease.



The Use of Video-Call in Early Labor Care: Exploring Midwives View of the Potential Benefits and Challenges
Sunday, May 20, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Mary Ann Faucher, CNM, PhD, FACNM

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Midwifery Matters - Business, Miscellaneous
Session Description:

This session reports on the results of a qualitative research study that explored the research question on whether midwives in the United States (US) and the United Kingdom (UK) see potential benefits and challenges of using video-calling technology to assess and support women in early labor. Focus groups were conducted followed by thematic content analysis. Preliminary analysis shows that most of the midwives see potential benefits of a video-calling service, however, some midwives had significant concerns about introducing video-calls into early labor care. There were variations in opinions across types of practices and birth settings.


Monday, May 21, 2018 8:30AM - 9:30AM
The Stakes are High: New Information About and Old Teratogen
Monday, May 21, 8:30AM - 9:30AM
Presented by:
Marilyn Pierce Bulger

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Miscellaneous
Session Description:
This presentation is designed to inspire midwives to develop personalized responses to common client scenarios by providing new information about alcohol use and the neurobehavioral and developmental risks of prenatal alcohol exposure. It will also promote the use of routine alcohol screening and brief intervention to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Research has verified that any amount of prenatal alcohol exposure can affect fetal development, resulting in a complex spectrum of disabilities that crosses racial and socioeconomic strata. Although alcohol use is an accepted social behavior, the combined trends of increasing binge-pattern alcohol use among reproductive-age women and persistently high unintended pregnancy rates create a perfect storm for an increased risk of missed or misdiagnosed preventable disabilities.
Objectives:
1. Discuss the complexities of addressing alcohol as a physical and behavioral teratogen in a society where its’ use is a common part of our culture
2. Describe a child’s signs and symptoms associated with the domains of impairment that can result from alcohol exposure during pregnancy
3. Explore and apply best practices for preventing alcohol-exposed pregnancies by using creative, motivational alcohol screening and brief intervention (aSBI) techniques.
4. Identify the unique role midwives (and other prenatal providers) can play to help relay alcohol use risk information to pediatric providers for use in future differential diagnosis

Monday, May 21, 2018 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Diving for Pearls: ACNM’s 4th Update: The Pearls of Midwifery for Reducing Primary Cesarean Deliveries
Monday, May 21, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Whitney Pinger, CNM, MSN, FACNM
Zoe Gutterman, CNM MPH
Jessie Blumin


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

The Pearls of Midwifery is ACNM’s resource that delineates the evidence supporting the Hallmarks of Midwifery and physiologic childbirth. Conceived of by Whitney Pinger CNM FACNM in 2008, “The Pearls” has contributed to a national shift in labor and delivery management across disciplines. This 10th Anniversary version of the Pearls of Midwifery includes a review of the evidence around each Pearl and support for the Pearls in professional current guidelines.  It focuses on how "The Pearls" can be implemented into midwifery practice and professional development across settings to improve maternal and neonatal outcomes, reduce cesarean deliveries, and promote physiologic birth.

Objectives:
1. Review the history of the development of The Pearls of Midwifery since it was first introduced in 2008, including recent updates and changes
2. Discuss the components and definitions of the Pearls of Midwifery 2017 Update
3. Examine the evidence supporting “The Pearls” including new research, professional recommendations, including ACOG's Committee Opinion, Approaches to Limit Intervention during Labor and Birth (2017), and guidelines that supports the role of The Pearls in midwifery care.
4. Recognize how “The Pearls” has been developed to support reducing health disparities and health inequalities by increasing access to midwifery care, addressing racism by promoting individualized care, and includes gender neutral and LGBTQ inclusive langua
5. Assess the role of “The Pearls” as a part of the Healthy Birth Initiative: Reducing Primary Cesarean Project bundles and integration into BirthTOOLS.
6. Examine how to implement “The Pearls” in any clinical midwifery practice setting through discussion of unit policies, benchmarking, and professional development materials that are built upon the evidence from The Pearls of Midwifery and how implementing “



Leading Change: Lessons in Leadership from the Reducing Primary Cesareans Project
Monday, May 21, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Leslie Cragin, CNM, PhD
Lisa Low, CNM, FACNM, FAAN


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

ACNM's Healthy Birth Initiative: Reducing Primary Cesareans is a national quality improvement interdisciplinary collaborative. Member hospitals, led by CNMs/CMs, have successfully implemented QI bundles leading to reduced rates of NTSV cesareans over the past 2 years.  This presentation will showcase the overall outcomes of the three year project  and is a “first look” at the power of midwifery leadership in quality improvement focused on reduction of cesarean birth. Participants will learn about the results of the initiative and become familiar with the leadership skills needed to conduct interdisciplinary quality improvement projects.

Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, participants will be able to state how the physiologic approach to support of women in labor leads to reduction of primary cesarean birth for low risk women.
2. At the end of the session participants will be able to discuss the necessary core elements of leadership skills leading to successful implementation of RPC bundles.
3. At the end of the session will be able to state 3 concrete examples of how to lead change for quality improvement in their hospitals.
4. At the end of the session the participants will be able to discuss lessons in leadership as experienced by the midwifery leaders at participating hospitals.
5. At the end of the presentation participants will be familiar with the outcomes of the RPC.



Pharmacology for Successful Tobacco Cessation
Monday, May 21, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Dawn Lovelace, CNM, FNP-C, DNP
Linda McDaniel, DNP APRN CNM
Julie Daniels, CNM, DNP
Laura Baraona, CNM


CEUs = 1
Rx = 45
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

Tobacco use is linked to numerous illnesses, adverse perinatal outcomes and early death.  Women metabolize and respond to nicotine differently than men. Pharmacological tobacco cessation interventions improve long term quit rates. The US Preventative Services Task Force recommends pharmacological therapy with behavioral counseling.  First-line tobacco cessation medications including nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), bupropion, and varenicline pharmacokinetics, efficacy, regimens, and safety profiles for non-pregnant, pregnant, and lactating women are reviewed.  Clinicians must conduct a needs assessment of the patient and family based on psychological, social, cultural, political and spiritual aspects when considering what pharmacologic and counseling options to offer.

Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to describe how women metabolize and use tobacco differently than men, with implications for cessation attempts.
2. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to list the safety profile and forms of nicotine replacement therapy that can be employed to assist non-pregnant women to quit smoking.
3. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to describe the benefits and risks of tobacco cessation pharmacological aids during pregnancy and lactation.
4. At the end of the session, the participant will apply cultural, social, psychological evaluations and cultural awareness when considering smoking cessation behavioral and pharmacological interventions.



Symbiomix Microbiota and Reproductive Health
Monday, May 21, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Caroline Mitchell, MD, MPH

CEUs = 1
Rx = .25
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:

It is estimated that we have five pounds of bacteria living in and on us.  Our microbes are essentially another organ system, interacting with our body in myriad ways.  The reproductive tract microbiota impact fertility, pregnancy, sexuality and menopause.  New technology to characterize the microbial community allows a broad characterization of bacteria that both help and hinder reproductive health.  Novel treatments targeting the reproductive tract microbiome may provide new strategies to promote better outcomes.


Monday, May 21, 2018 9:45AM - 11:45AM
The Value of Midwifery Presence in Health Systems: Consortium on Safe Labor Insights
Monday, May 21, 9:45AM - 11:45AM
Presented by:
Nicole Carlson, CNM, PhD
Julia Phillippi, PhD, CNM, FACNM
Jeremy Neal
Ellen Tilden


CEUs = 2
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
Using Consortium for Safe Labor data, we explored whether the presence of midwives in a hospital system was associated with changes in labor interventions and labor outcomes (cesarean birth, vaginal birth after cesarean, and neonatal/maternal morbidity and mortality) when compared with hospitals without midwives. Presence of midwives in US hospital systems was associated with a pattern of decreased intervention during labor during perinatal care of healthy women with uncomplicated pregnancies. After matching the sample on demographic characteristics, women birthing in hospitals with vs. without a midwifery presence had a 74% reduction in risk for oxytocin augmentation (p<0.001) and a 12% reduction in risk for cesarean birth (p<0.05). Midwifery presence was associated with a 31% reduction in risk for cesarean birth in multiparous women with a trial of labor. In women with a uterine scar, midwifery presence was associated with a 57% reduced risk of elective cesarean. In this colloquium, we will discuss our three analyses of this database, highlight avenues for future research, and provide time for networking and discussion at the end of the session.
Objectives:
1. Describe the Consortium for Safe Labor (CSL) database and its use in current perinatal research
2. List 3 strengths of the CSL database
3. List 3 challenges or limitations with the CSL database that affect data quality
4. Describe the Robson criteria and their usefulness in categorizing reasons for cesarean birth.
5. Detail Robson criteria findings using the CSL data (the effect of midwifery presence within a health system on the reasons provided for cesarean section)
6. State the effect of midwifery presence within a health system on perinatal outcomes (unplanned cesarean birth, trial of labor after cesarean birth) and intrapartum processes of care (early labor admission to hospital, labor induction) for nulliparous and

Monday, May 21, 2018 11:00AM - 12:00PM
5th Annual March of Dimes ACNM Symposium: A Blueprint for Maternal Child Health Activism
Monday, May 21, 11:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Ginger Breedlove, CNM, PhD, FACNM

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Leadership
Session Description:
As providers, we are responsible for not only caring for women, but also to be informed and engaged in policy that impacts their health and wellbeing. It is past time that the US recognize maternal health as an equivalent area of need by understanding the rising maternal mortality rate, provider shortage, rural underserved, and health inequity's surrounding maternal child health. This session provides a blueprint for taking the opportunity to enhance awareness of key federal and state bills that influence the ability to care for moms and babies in our country. Tools will be provided that enhance one's ability to tell the story, find relevant and meaningful data specific to your story, and strategy to effectively disseminate key messages to policymakers as well as consumers.



AABC Strong Start:  Freestanding Birth Centers Serving Vulnerable Populations
Monday, May 21, 11:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Jill Alliman, CNM, DNP, FACNM
Susan Stapleton, CNM, DNP, FACNM


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Racism and Disparities
Session Description:

AABC Strong Start was a 4 year project to determine whether birth center midwifery care could improve outcome disparities for Medicaid beneficiaries.  Clinical and participant entered data demonstrate dramatic outcomes for a vulnerable population of women and newborns receiving care in birth centers.  In this study, a more diverse population received birth center care than in the National Birth Center Study (Stapleton et al., 2013), but outcomes were similar.  Women and infants with more risk factors related to preterm birth experienced better health, higher rates of satisfaction, and cost savings than in other models of care.

Objectives:
1. Describe disparities in maternal and infant health outcomes among racial and economically vulnerable families.
2. Name barriers that arise for Medicaid beneficiaries to access care in birth centers.
3. List 3 maternal or infant health indicators that can be impacted by birth center prenatal care. Demonstrate importance of engaging key stakeholders to improve access to midwifery model birth center care for more vulnerable women Demonstrate importance of engaging key stakeholders to improve access to midwifery model birth center care for more vulnerable women List 3 maternal and infant health indicators that may be impacted by birth center prenatal care.
4. Engage key policy leaders on importance of improving access to midwifery led freestanding birth center care.



Please Don't Fire My Patient: How to Support Your Pregnant Patients' Ability to Earn an Income and Stay Healthy on the Job
Monday, May 21, 11:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Liz Morris, JD

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education, Midwifery Matters - Business
Session Description:

Learn how to help your pregnant and breastfeeding patients continue earning an income while staying healthy on the job. Explore workplace legal protections concerning accommodation, discrimination, and leave, as well as best practices for talking to your patients about workplace issues. The majority of working pregnant women require some form of reasonable accommodation, and low-income women and women of color are more likely both to need accommodations and to face discrimination. Receive step-by-step training on how to write effective work accommodation notes, as outlined in ACOG’s 2018 Committee Opinion on Employment Considerations During Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period.




Quality Improvement to Promote High-Quality Maternity Care and Physiologic Birth
Monday, May 21, 11:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Megan Danielson, CNM, MSN
Janelle Komorowski, DNP, CNM


CEUs = 0
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

This session will discuss quality improvement initiatives at the national and state levels, as well as ways to utilize these initiatives and the PDSA quality improvement cycle to promote physiologic birth and high-quality maternity care at the local level. ACNM’s BirthTOOLS.org (Tools to Optimize the Outcomes of Labor Safely) houses evidence-based research, policies, exemplar programs, and audit tools. By highlighting optimal usage of the site and the quality improvement resources available, participants will walk away with tools to transform individual and organizational practice. Case studies will be used to highlight the site’s ability to support those seeking to make change.

Objectives:
1. Define high-quality maternity care and discuss how promoting physiologic birth for all women leads to quality care.
2. Define quality improvement and the PDSA process.
3. Identify organizations and resources available to promote quality improvement and decrease healthcare disparities.
4. Describe the elements of the ACNM BirthTOOLS.org toolkit that are available to promote physiologic birth for all women.
5. Identify specific strategies and resources available through BirthTOOLS.org that can be used to implement a specific practice change to promote quality improvement in your maternity care setting.



Teaching Students to Care about Cultural Humility and Social Justice: What Does it Take?
Monday, May 21, 11:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Maria Valentin-Welch, CNM, DNP, MPH, CDP, FACNM
Essence Williams, SNM, BSN, CBE, CCE


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education, Racism and Disparities
Session Description:

Preparing midwives to join our profession and take it into the future requires teaching beyond clinical expertise.  We need to teach more intangible competencies, such as cultural humility and social justice when it comes to bringing our profession forward in terms of racism and diversity.  Our profession has made a commitment to them in our professional Code of Ethics and the Hallmarks of Midwifery.  Educators know this, however, it’s easier to teach clinical skills than the intangibles.  In this presentation, we will review what we know from scholarship about teaching these topics and share our experiences in applying particular approaches.

Objectives:
1. Participants will identify educational scholarship findings to teaching midwifery students about culture and social justice.
2. Participants will apply selected specific approaches to teaching about culture and social justice.
3. Participants will identify resources to teach about culture and social justice in light of their own teaching needs.

Monday, May 21, 2018 11:00AM - 1:00PM
Beyond Transgender 101: Moving from provider shock toward provider competence
Monday, May 21, 11:00AM - 1:00PM
Presented by:
clare sherley, CNM, DNP
Simon Ellis, MSN, CNM


CEUs = 2
Rx = 60
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Racism and Disparities
Session Description:

Ready to move past pronouns and basic concepts? Are you asking: Am I qualified to manage gender affirming hormones? How will my pregnant TGNC patients differ from my other patients? What tools will I need to ensure my TGNC patients get respectful and appropriate care? Are there specific mental health concerns that I should be addressing? Is testosterone contraception? This presentation answers these questions to create a more competent CNM workforce with the tools they need to provide better reproductive healthcare to TGNC patients. Are you ready to be more comfortable, competent, and proactive in providing trans care? Join us!

Objectives:
1. Participants will demonstrate understanding of health disparities specific to TGNC populations and their role in addressing those disparities.
2. Participants will demonstrate understanding of mental health concerns specific to TGNC patients and specific methods for screening and management.
3. Participants will demonstrate basic understanding of primary care of TGNC patients, including the initiation and management of gender affirming hormone management.
4. Participants will demonstrate basic understanding of specific gynecologic and obstetric care considerations for TGNC patients and methods for preparing clinic and hospital staff to appropriately care for TGNC patients.

Monday, May 21, 2018 12:15PM - 1:15PM
Applying the Triple Risk Model to Stillbirth: Implications for Clinical Practice
Monday, May 21, 12:15PM - 1:15PM
Presented by:
Deena Mallareddy, CNM RN MSN BA/BS
Suzanne Pullen, PhD


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The Triple Risk Model has been used to explain the underlying etiology of SUID (Sudden Unexplained Infant Death). This seminar presents research that extends the Triple Risk Model to stillbirth and IUFD (intrauterine fetal death). Recommendations for increasing maternal observation and improving clinic diagnosis.
Objectives:
1. The learner will apply the Triple Risk Model of SUID (Sudden Unexplained Infant Death) to stillbirth and IUFD (intrauterine fetal death)
2. The learner will describe clinical interventions targeting maternal factors and observations that are potential risk factors for stillbirth
3. The learner will identify potential missed diagnostic opportunities related to placental factors that are potential risk factors for stillbirth
4. The learner will identify potential missed diagnostic opportunities related to IUGR (intrauterine growth restriction) that are potential risk factors for stillbirth.



Are Autism, Pre-Eclampsia, and Alzheimer’s Disease Stops on the Same Trajectory?
Monday, May 21, 12:15PM - 1:15PM
Presented by:
Kristen Montgomery, PhD, CNM

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

This presentation will review current research on the links between autism, pre-eclampsia, and the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Preliminary research has shown linkages through elevated maternal blood pressure during pregnancy that may contribute to autism in the offspring of pre-eclamptic pregnant women and Alzheimer’s disease in women with a history of pre-eclampsia. Genetic and environmental factors also contribute and will be discussed within the context of recent research.

Objectives:
1. 1. Identify 2 characteristics of autism, pre-eclampsia, and Alzheimer’s disease.
2. 2.       Discuss research linkages between autism, pre-eclampsia, and Alzheimer’s disease.
3. 3.       Apply research findings to clinical practice setting.
4. 4.       Identify 1 future clinical application that is being developed.



Benchmarking 101-Just do it!
Monday, May 21, 12:15PM - 1:15PM
Presented by:
Karen Perdion, CNM, MSN
Molly MacMorris-Adix, CNM, DNP
Celina Cunanan, CNM


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Business
Session Description:

The ACNM Benchmarking project is an important tool to describe midwifery practice outcomes and drive quality improvement. This presentation will review the basics of benchmarking, including collecting and submitting data, as well as how to interpret and apply your practice report. Overcoming barriers to participation will be discussed.  Preliminary data from 2017 will also be shared. After attending this session, there will be nothing stopping you from just doing it!

Objectives:
1. Explain the benefits and application of the ACNM benchmarking project to the profession and individual practices
2. Demonstrate an example for collecting and reporting data to the ACNM benchmarking project.
3. Explain the components of the ACNM benchmarking practice report and how to apply the interpreted data to quality improvement.
4. Identify trends and outcomes from 2017 benchmarking data



Chronic Kidney Disease Dispararities Among African America Women: Management of CKD and Reflection of Lived Experience
Monday, May 21, 12:15PM - 1:15PM
Presented by:
Sharona Johnson, PhD, FNP-BC
Heather Clarke, LM, CNM, DNP, FACNM


CEUs = 1
Rx = 10
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Education, Racism and Disparities
Session Description:

Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) disproportionately affects African Americans, but little focus has been placed on CKD management for this population.  Medication management along with knowledge of beliefs, cultural values, and practices specific to African American women is central to competent CKD care.  Health professionals understanding of the impact of stress, racism, transgenerational and epigenetic factors related to health and disease in African American women with CKD can contribute to the improved care of kidney disease. This should result in reducing race related disparities of CKD.

 

 

 




Zika Virus in the Americas: Where are we now and where are we headed?
Monday, May 21, 12:15PM - 1:15PM
Presented by:
Lisa Noguchi, CNM, PhD

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Global Midwifery
Session Description:

What do midwives need to know about the current status of the Zika virus outbreak in the Americas? What are the latest Zika-related recommendations for clinical practice and how should we integrate them into midwifery services? What have experts projected regarding the possibility of future outbreaks of Zika virus infection? This presentation is an update of Dr. Lisa Noguchi's popular presentation from last year's ACNM Annual Meeting.

Objectives:
1. The learner will be able to describe briefly the status of the Zika virus epidemic in the Americas.
2. The learner will be able to describe components of routine Zika-related counseling for pregnant women.
3. The learner will be able to describe three components of midwifery management of suspected Zika virus infection in pregnancy.
4. The learner will be able to describe what experts have forecasted for future Zika virus outbreaks.

Monday, May 21, 2018 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Looking Back to Look Forward: Midwives of Color Fulfilling America's Unmet Promise
Monday, May 21, 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Keisha Goode
Linda Janet Holmes


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
For more than 400 years, black and white women have counted on midwives of color to provide birthing care. Their wisdom and skills led women to recognize and respect midwives as important familial and community resources. This presentation begins with the historical contributions of black midwives in Georgia, from enslavement through Jim Crow segregation. Photographs and multimedia images will be used to examine midwifery within Americaʼs historical, social, and political context. Recognizing that the very same macro and micro structures and experiences of racism that collectively challenged the work of black midwives and midwives of color more generally still affect midwifery today, this presentation looks to the future with recommendations for a process that appreciates the contributions of midwives of color and focuses on truth and reconciliation.

Monday, May 21, 2018 5:30PM - 6:30PM
A Meta-Analysis of the Neonatal Outcomes of Waterbirth
Monday, May 21, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Priscilla Hall, PhD CNM RN
Jennifer Vanderlaan, PhD CNM MPH


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Education
Session Description:

Waterbirth is a valuable strategy for pain management and comfort in labor.   Previous reviews have focused on the randomized controlled trials, however multiple non-randomized controlled studies, clinical audits, and observational studies have yet to be synthesized.  For this study, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of neonatal outcomes of water birth including both randomized control trials as well as observational studies.  We identified there is no evidence that water birth increases the odds of poor neonatal outcomes.  We will discuss clinical and research implications of these findings.

Objectives:
1. The learner will demonstrate knowledge of the structure of the meta-analysis and systematic review of neonatal outcomes of water birth, including the inclusion/exclusion criteria for study selection, the search strategy for identifying literature and the
2. The learner will demonstrate knowledge of the synthesis and analysis of neonatal outcomes of water birth (including shoulder dystocia, 5 minute APGAR, resuscitation, umbilical pH, hypothermia, pneumonia and other infections, respiratory distress, NICU admission and neonatal death) compared to conventional birth in hospitals.
3. The learner will demonstrate knowledge of the clinical implications of this review, including recommendations for policy/practice guideline development and future research related to water birth outcomes.



Amniotic Fluid Lactate Monitoring: A Novel Approach to Labor Dystocia Diagnosis and Management
Monday, May 21, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Katherine Kissler, CNM, MSN, PhD Student

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Miscellaneous
Session Description:

Labor dystocia accounts for approximately half of cesareans performed during labor in the United States, yet diagnosis and treatment of labor dystocia rarely differentiates between underlying causes. Amniotic fluid lactate (AFL), measured non-invasively with a handheld point-of-care lactate monitor, has been found to be a strong predictor for labor dystocia and cesarean indicating uterine fatigue which fails to respond to pitocin augmentation. This education session synthesizes the recent research on the relationship between AFL and labor dystocia and proposes applications for clinical practice and research that may increase precision in care for women with labor dystocia to promote vaginal birth.

Objectives:
1. At the end of the presentation the participant will understand the literature on the relationship between AFL and labor dystocia.
2. At the end of the presentation the participant will understand the proposed pathophysiology underlying the relationship between AFL and labor dystocia and can identify the strengths and limitations of the current research.
3. At the end of the presentation the participant will know the proposed classification of labor dystocia, the methods for differentiating phenotypes of labor dystocia, and the proposed interventions appropriate for each type.
4. At the end of the presentation the participant will be aware of the limitations of current research and the need for future research to inform evidence based practice.
5. At the end of the presentation the participant will be informed of ways that AFL monitoring could inform intrapartum shared decision making by more precisely diagnosing labor dystocia and contributing to the individualization of the care plan.



Beyond Teaching: The Important Role of PhD-Prepared Midwives in Women's Health Research and Practice
Monday, May 21, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Mary Paterno, CNM, PhD
Jeanne Murphy, CNM, PhD


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Leadership
Session Description:

Midwives should be at the forefront of research in women's health; to accomplish this, there is a need for more PhD-prepared midwives. Midwives who desire research-focused doctoral preparation have many options when selecting an educational program. We will discuss the importance of PhD education for midwives, scope of PhD training and historical context, and considerations for selecting a research mentor. We will describe completing a PhD at different points in a midwifery career, how to find time, and funding prospects. We will also highlight an array of job opportunities for PhD-prepared midwives that go beyond traditional academic settings.

Objectives:
1. Describe the importance of midwives as principal investigators in women's health research.
2. Name at least three fields of PhD study for midwives to consider.
3. Articulate considerations for selecting a research mentor and educational program.
4. List at least three distinct job options for the PhD-prepared midwife.



How to Make Precepting Work for You--Innovative Models for Educating Students
Monday, May 21, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Cara Busenhart, CNM, PhD
Melissa Stec, CNM, DNP, APRN, FACNM, FAAN


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:

Every midwife and every clinical setting has opportunities to offer midwifery students, yet many midwives are afraid that their specific practice characteristics will prevent them from taking midwifery students into their setting. We are here to help you think of innovative ways that precepting can work for any practice site and any provider. Case scenarios and exemplars will be provided for a variety of practice types--solo midwife practice, out-of-hospital birth, large multi-provider practices, and academic medical centers. Opportunities for sharing success strategies amongst participants will be offered.

Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to list 3 ways that their practice site would be appropriate as a clinical site for a midwifery student.
2. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to identify resources for precepting.
3. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to apply exemplars from precepting practice to their own site.



Marijuana in Pregnancy: Sorting Through Hazy Evidence
Monday, May 21, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Tori Metz

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
No description available at time of publication



Nuts and Bolts of Legislation: Updates and Action
Monday, May 21, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Katharine Green, PhD(c), CNM
Amy Kohl
Emily Hayes, DNP, CNM, WHNP


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Leadership, Midwifery Matters - Public Perception, Miscellaneous
Session Description:
This session will help give midwives up-to-date information and effective techniques to bring about policy change at local, state and federal levels. The presentation will review and discuss legislative successes and challenges since the 2017 ACNM Annual Meeting, and will look at upcoming legislation of importance to ACNM members. "Nuts and bolts" practical advice will be included on how midwives can influence health policy.
Objectives:
1. At the end of this session, the participant will be able to discuss legislative successes and challenges of interest to midwives in the last year.
2. At the end of this session, the participant will be able to discuss current and upcoming legislative actions supported by ACNM.
3. At the end of this session, the participant will be able to discuss and apply effective techniques that midwives can use to influence health policy.
4. At the end of this session, the participant will understand the political advocacy supports available through ACNM.



Refugee Women’s Health Care; A Topic for all Midwives
Monday, May 21, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Courtney Steer-Massaro, CNM, FNP-C, MPH, RN

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

In 2016 the United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees estimated there were over 10 million refugees worldwide. Mass migrations has resulted in a dramatic rise in asylum seekers and refugees, and has brought a large number of these women to the U.S. in need of high quality healthcare. These women have unique needs, not only from an OB/GYN viewpoint, but also from an overall health outlook. It is imperative for midwives to understand how to provide asylum seekers/refugees with the highest level of holistic, trauma-informed care, while also ensuring that their visits are tailored to the woman's health needs. 

Objectives:
1. At the end of the session participants will be able to state the definition of a “Refugee” and “Asylum Seeker”.
2. At the end of the session participants will be able to discuss 3 of trauma’s effects on a patient’s overall health.
3. At the end of the session participants will be able to explain trauma-informed communication tools.
4. At the end of the session participants will be able to list at least 3 refugee-specific OB screening tests.
5. At the end of the session participants will be able to identify the different types of FGM and discuss possible obstetric complications and management options.

Tuesday, May 22, 2018 11:00AM - 12:00PM
Designing Systems to Improve Care for Every Mother, Everywhere
Tuesday, May 22, 11:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Neal Shah

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
All Americans should be able to start or grow their families with dignity. This requires systems that deliver care that is supportive, safe, and affordable. Currently, in nearly every social segment and geographic corridor of our country, from the Upper East Side of Manhattan to rural Oklahoma, our systems fail to deliver on these goals reliably. The result is a largely invisible epidemic of avoidable suffering among birthing families. This talk will discuss how we can create better role clarity among those of us best positioned to help and then redesign our systems of care to ensure every birthing family gets the care they deserve.

Tuesday, May 22, 2018 1:30PM - 2:30PM
Bugs not Drugs: Selecting Probiotic Bacteria to Best Meet Client Needs
Tuesday, May 22, 1:30PM - 2:30PM
Presented by:
Lisa Hanson, PhD, CNM, FACNM

CEUs = 1
Rx = 60
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

In the provision of women's healthcare, midwives recommend probiotics as complementary and integrative therapies. A variety of over the counter products are available to clients and the choices can be overwhelming. Probiotics will be defined, including mechanisms of action. Information will include probiotic bacterial genera, species, strains, dosages, routes, as well as the implications of administration (e.g., tablet versus freeze dried capsule), storage and expiration dates on efficacy. The available research on single and multi strain probiotic supplements and products will be examined. Scientific evidence for probiotic prescriptions for at least three conditions pertinent to midwifery practice will be provided.

Objectives:
1. Describe probiotics including mechanisms of action.
2. Differentiate between probiotic bacterial genera, species, and strain.
3. Compare and contrast the benefits of single and multi strain probiotic supplements and products.
4. Prescribe probiotic products with maximal potency using appropriate dosages and routes.
5. List evidence-based probiotic prescriptions for three common women's health problems.



Case Study Presentations with Expert Panel Discussion: Difficult and Unique Topics
Tuesday, May 22, 1:30PM - 2:30PM
Presented by:
Ginger Breedlove, CNM, PhD, FACNM
Andrew Youmans, CNM, CPEN, FAWM
Barbara Anderson, CNM
Mandesa Smith


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
No description available at time of publication



Maternal Health Crisis: Maternal Mortality in the US
Tuesday, May 22, 1:30PM - 2:30PM
Presented by:
Katrina Nardini, CNM, MSN, WHNP
Lisa Hollier, MD, MPH
Christina Tice, CNM, RN, MSN
Tori Metz
Julie Zaharatos
Lisa Hollier, MD, MPH
Christina Tice, CNM, RN, MSN
Tori Metz


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Education, Leadership, Racism and Disparities
Session Description:
With the data we have we can say how the women are but we can’t say why maternal mortality disproportionately affects women of color, so we took that out. Also, the latest severe maternal morbidity (SMM) estimate is 50,000, not 60k and the way SMM measures are structured they do not count instances during pregnancy, so you’ll see the text below is slightly different. The 50,000 annual SMM figure is important to use beside the 700 maternal deaths annual estimate, but please note that this session will not go into morbidity other than to say that by preventing the causes of maternal mortality we can also prevent the causes of morbidity. The focus of the panel is on the maternal mortality review committee experience in their respective states



Reducing Recurrent Preterm Birth:  Predictive and Preventative Strategies for Midwifery
Tuesday, May 22, 1:30PM - 2:30PM
Presented by:
Rebecca Cypher, MSN, PNNP

CEUs = 1
Rx = 60
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

Preterm birth is a leading cause of perinatal and neonatal morbidity and mortality.  Priorities have shifted focusing on prevention, especially in women with prior preterm histories while significant clinical advances have been made with early recognition based on risk factors and interventions, like progesterone, ultrasound, pessaries or cerclage. Midwifery plays an important role as first line clinicians who can identify and refer while other colleagues participate in alternative practice models like residency programs faculty where they advocate for normalizing high risk conditions. This session will highlight predictive and preventative strategies in managing this high risk population.  

Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant should be able to  recognize fundamental preterm birth concepts including definitions, risk factors, etiology and physical assessment
2. At the end of the session the participant should be able to formulate an evidence based medication plan that is associated with decreasing morbidity and mortality in women at high risk for preterm birth.
3. At the end of the session the participant should be able to produce a management plan taking into consideration use, benefits, and limitations of tools available to predict and  prevent preterm birth in women with prior preterm birth
4. At the end of the session the participant should be able identify different roles midwives can have in caring for patients with prior preterm birth



Rise Up-What are you going to do about HIV now?
Tuesday, May 22, 1:30PM - 2:30PM
Presented by:
Gwendolyn Bampfield, MSW, JD

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
No description available at time of publication

Tuesday, May 22, 2018 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Back, Boxes, Beside Mom-- Infant Sleeping Conundrums
Tuesday, May 22, 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Presented by:
Michelle Collins, PhD, CNM, FACNM, FAAN

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
A Critical look at the Back to Sleep campaign impacts empowering and instructing parents how to safely sleep their infants. Midwives have the unique opportunity, and responsibility, to educate new parents on safe infant sleep. Taking a critical look at the literature underlying the issues of back, box or next to mom is imperative in order to be able to provide clients with the most objective, evidence-based advice. Whether you feel strongly one way or the other, this session will provide information that will definitely leave attendees questioning the status quo.



Client and Provider Factors Associated with Integration of Family Planning Services among Maternal and Reproductive Health Clients in Kigoma Region, Tanzania: A Cross-Sectional Study April-July 2016
Tuesday, May 22, 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Presented by:
Michelle Dynes, CNM, MSN, MPH, RN, PhD

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:

Integration of family planning (FP) services into non-FP care visits is an essential strategy for reducing maternal and neonatal mortality through reduction of short birth intervals and unplanned pregnancies. We conducted cross-sectional surveys across 61 facilities in Kigoma Region, Tanzania, April to July 2016 using matched client and provider data to model factors for receipt of FP information and FP method. Implications for future research and strategies to better integrate FP services into non-FP care visits will be discussed.




Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV): The Most Common Congenital Infection Affecting Newborns that 91% of Women Don't Know About
Tuesday, May 22, 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Presented by:
Kristen Spytek, MA

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education, Midwifery Matters - Public Perception, Miscellaneous
Session Description:

This session is designed to be an overview of Congenital CMV Infection. The presenter will cover basic information about transmission, prevention, prevalence, treatment, and intervention. How can we, as a nonprofit organization, change public health and policy perceptions about congenital CMV? Through advocacy and education, how can we help build the capacity of providers to diagnose and identify an appropriate course of treatment?




Effects of Toxic Stress on Early Brain Development: Epigenetics, neurobiological mechanisms of action, and the midwifery role in prevention of long term adverse health outcomes
Tuesday, May 22, 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Presented by:
Terri Clark, PhD, CNM, ARNP, RN, FACNM

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Antenatal maternal stress negatively affects fetal neurophysiology and significantly increases the risk of adverse long term health outcomes in the young child, and even the adolescent.The neurobiology of adversity and toxic stress will be reviewed in depth, as well as the physiologic mechanisms of cellular level "epigenetic" changes. The serious effects of telomere shortening and fetal brain structural remodeling due to maternal stress will be also be described. It will be argued that adverse childhood events (ACES) in the history of the pregnant woman are to be recognized as signals of significant risk to both maternal and fetal future health. A specific guide for midwifery action and intervention for the pregnant woman at risk will be discussed.
Objectives:
1. 1.Define and differentiate positive, tolerable, and toxic stress exposure and its impact on early brain development.
2. 2.Explain neurobiological mechanisms that mediate the effects of stress on the brain and brain development.
3. 3.Relate chronic exposure to toxic stress as a predisposing factors and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) that increase disease risk.
4. 4.Discuss the implications for midwifery practice to prevent toxic stress in pregnancy, and to reduce adverse maternal-child long term health effects through early intervention and individualized prenatal care.



Patient and Provider Determinants for Receipt of Three Dimensions of Respectful Maternity Care in Kigoma Region, Tanzania, April- July 2016
Tuesday, May 22, 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Presented by:
Michelle Dynes, CNM, MSN, MPH, RN, PhD

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:

Lack of respectful maternity care is increasingly recognized as a human rights issue and a key deterrent to women seeking facility-based deliveries. We conducted cross-sectional surveys across 61 facilities in Kigoma Region, Tanzania, April to July 2016. Measures of RMC were developed using 21-items in a Principal Components Analysis. Results from multilevel, mixed effects generalized linear regression analyses on matched client and provider data from 249 providers and 935 post-delivery clients will be shared. Recommendations for future research and programmatic implications will be discussed.




Perspectives from Providers and Mothers on the Benefits of and Barriers to Respectful Maternity Care (RMC) in a Refugee Camp Setting in Thailand
Tuesday, May 22, 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Presented by:
Anjali Madeira, DNP, MPH, MN, RN

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:

This study aimed to 1) describe providers’ and women’s perspectives on benefits of and barriers to providing Respectful Maternity Care (RMC), and 2) describe Burmese refugee women’s maternity care experiences. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions with 13 maternity care providers and 11 women were conducted in two refugee camps and a government hospital. Mothers reported lack of patient privacy and consent, ethnic and religious discrimination, and verbal and physical abuse by providers. Challenges to RMC delivery included language and cultural barriers, high patient volume, provider stress, lack of mutual trust, and the lack of accountability and monitoring mechanisms.




Reduction of Peripartum Racial/Ethnic Disparities Safety Bundle
Tuesday, May 22, 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Presented by:
Jessica Brumley, CNM, PhD

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Racism and Disparities
Session Description:

Significant racial and ethnic disparities exist in both obstetrics care and maternal morbidty/mortality outcomes. Research suggests that systems level factor are  frequent contributors and that safety protocols may improve outsome.  The Reduction of Peripartum Racial/Ethnic Disparities Safety Bundle,  is a tool to address disparities under a patient safety umbrella.

Objectives:
1. Provide an overview of racial and ethnic disparities in pregnancy care and outcomes
2. Examine framework for understanding disparities and how this framework informs the development of this bundle
3. Provide an in-depth overview of the “Reduction of Peripartum Racial/Ethnic Disparities” Patient Safety Bundle
4. Identify resources to customize the bundle for use within your organization



The 2018 Fellows Talk: Midwives in Politics - Leaders Making Change
Tuesday, May 22, 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Presented by:
Heather Bradford, CNM, ARNP, FACNM
Cheri Van Hoover, CNM, MS
Debbie Jessup, CNM, PhD, FACNM
Kate Harrod, CNM, PhD, FACNM


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Leadership
Session Description:

With the goal of growing more politically-active midwives, two leaders in politics and political action will share their career experiences, political motivations, and aspirations for change.  Debbie Jessup, CNM, PhD, FACNM has over 30 years of experience in midwifery, women’s health and health policy and serves as a Health Policy Advisor for U.S. Congresswoman Lucille Roybal-Allard. Cheri Van Hoover, CNM, MS, ran in 2017 for Hospital District Commissioner in Washington state and is a leader in teaching online health policy.  The Fellows Panel will be moderated by Heather Bradford, CNM, ARNP, FACNM and Kate Harrod, CNM, PhD, FACNM.

Objectives:
1. The participant will identify potential career paths in politics and policy work.
2. The participant will identify several strategies for developing a career path toward political work.
3. The participant will learn about the benefits to the profession of midwifery engagement in the political arena.

Tuesday, May 22, 2018 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Collaboration Across the Continuum: Safe and Collegial Transfer of Women from Community Setting to Hospital
Tuesday, May 22, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Amanda Huber, APRN, CNM, IBCLC
Aly Folin, CPM, LM
Carrie Neerland, MS, APRN, CNM, FACNM


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Public Perception
Session Description:

Birth in the community setting (home or birth center birth) is a growing practice. Midwives and obstetric colleagues in the hospital setting are often under-prepared or overwhelmed when a hospital transfer from the community setting occurs. This presentation is delivered by a seasoned interprofessional panel, and delivers comprehensive and concrete tools to develop and implement practices to standardize and improve transfers of care. Presenters use examples from the Twin Cities metro to demonstrate how to build interprofessional relationships, implement a transfer of care protocol, and use risk stratification of patients to identify the most to identify the appropriate care provider.

Objectives:
1. Attendees will gain understanding of national recommendations from the home Birth Summit for best practice in provision of maternity and newborn care during transfers of care from the site of intended community birth site to the hospital care, and gain th
2. From the example of the Minnesota midwifery and community birth demographics, participants will gain understanding of the scope and role of midwives in community birth, and the outcomes of improving interprofessional relationships between midwifery providers who practice in the community and hospital setting.
3. Attendees will be able to identify how collaborative interprofessional care between midwifery and obstetric providers increases patient access to safe midwifery care in the context of transfer from intended community birth site to hospital, and use North Memorial Medical Center’s example to define criteria for risk stratification of women.
4. Attendees will learn the necessary information to implement a transfer of care policy on their hospital units, with the goal of optimizing the quality and safety of care for all women and fetuses



Creating Health in Any Zip Code: Defeating Geographical Health Disparities
Tuesday, May 22, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Janelle Komorowski, DNP, CNM

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Racism and Disparities
Session Description:

Where your patient lives may have a greater impact on her health than genetics.  In America today, life expectancy in some neighborhoods is less than that of many third-world countries, while life expectancy in a neighborhood a short distance away may be as much as 25 years longer.  Chronic disease--one of the most pervasive health problems of our day--disproportionately affects the underserved.  But these problems are not insurmountable.  This presentation demonstrates how the midwife can be a catalyst for creating health in any zip code.

Objectives:
1. 1.  At the end of the session the participant should be able to list three examples of geographical health disparities.
2. 2.  At the end of the session the participant should be able to identify causes of health disparities in his or her own practice region.
3. 3.  At the end of the session the participant should be able to identify the "Essential Four" principles adapted from Blue Zone communities and at least two strategies for promoting each principle in underserved populations.
4. 4.  At the end of the session the participant should be able to create an action plan to implement promotion of the Essential Four into his or her own practice.



Fulfilling the Commitments of ACNM: Changing the Face of Midwifery
Tuesday, May 22, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Joelle Leacock, CNM, MSN
Katherine Rushfirth, CNM
Susan Hernandez, CNM, MSN


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Racism and Disparities
Session Description:
This session will discuss methods to improve representation and inclusion in the midwifery workforce. This goal is both timely and imperative to achieving equitable care for all people. It is unfathomable to many that in the United States infant mortality remains two times higher, and maternal mortality four times higher in African-American populations than in the Caucasian populations. It is well established that lack of diversity in health care professions, including midwifery, contribute to health disparities. It is our duty as an organization to improve outcomes for vulnerable populations by recruiting and developing midwives who reflect the diversity of the women and families we serve. It is also imperative that midwives advocate for, and involve themselves in policies and initiatives to address the social determinants of health. However few ACNM Affiliates have the structure to address this professional issue. We will present the strategic plan developed by the Massachusetts ACNM affiliate focusing on mentoring, community relationships, and public education. The plan can be reproduced and implemented by state affiliates to establish programs and resources that fulfill the Core Commitment of Diversification and Inclusion as set out in ACNM's Strategic Plan.
Objectives:
1. Identify the barriers to entering midwifery, the correlation between representation and health disparities, and the experiences of people of color in our profession
2. Identify the steps and priorities to forming and recruiting for a successful Affiliate level Diversity & Inclusion Committee
3. Identify strategies to approach and partner with schools and community organizations to broaden and deepen impact of diversity and inclusion efforts



Have You Implemented Early Warning Systems in Your Practice?  A Call to Action for Midwives
Tuesday, May 22, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Rebecca Cypher, MSN, PNNP

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

Although the World Health Organization announced a reduction in worldwide maternal mortality rates, opportunity still remains for improving obstetric outcomes. Lack of knowledge, delayed recognition and treatment, inadequate management continue to be an obstacle in preventing adverse events. Widespread efforts to reduce maternal mortality remains a priority. Utilization of early warning systems is one option to respond to clinical events that may result in maternal morbidity or mortality. This presentation will briefly discuss the current state of maternal mortality and describe how use of early warning systems in midwifery can support and guide initiatives to improve maternal outcomes.

Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant should be able to summarize facts and figures related to maternal mortality in the United States
2. At the end of the session the participant should be able to recognize the significance of early warning systems in management of maternal compromise
3. At the end of the session the participant should be able to compare and contrast early warning systems in obstetrical care



Teaching "With Women" Where Needed: Variations and Challenges Across 5 African Countries.
Tuesday, May 22, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Wreatha Carner, CNM, MN, DNP
Nicole Geller, RN, MS, CNM, PhD
Deborah Goldman, CNM, MPH
Olivia Kroening-Roche, CNM
Julia Rasch, CNM
Linda Robinson, CNM
Tess Weidner, CNM


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education, Global Midwifery, Leadership
Session Description:

Narratives of challenges faced by teaching midwifery in resource-limited settings inform this presentation. These teachers share their experiences over the course of one year. The narratives examine the influences of pedagogy, practice, culture, and policy on already strained systems in Sub-Saharan Africa. Such systems are currently unable to independently build their own workforce capacity due to limited resources. They are dependent on continuing and focused investment in global health capacity and quality building within educational systems utilizing visiting midwifery faculty. Our panel outlines how it is to live and work in midwifery education in the Sub-Saharan Africa environment.

Objectives:
1. Speakers will bring our sister midwives up-to-date on midwifery education work for maternal, perinatal and neonatal morbidity and mortality reduction efforts in Sub Saharan Africa.
2. Presenters will enable midwives with an interest in global midwifery education to learn from the experiences of midwives that have had the courage to try teaching abroad as visiting faculty.
3. Attendees will be able to describe four areas where challenges exist for midwives teaching in resource limited settings in Sub-Saharan Africa and will further be able to discuss specific aspects of challenge within these four areas.
4. Listeners now being able to outline these four common areas of challenge with new knowledge of methods and interventions used by visiting faculty to contend with such challenges, are then invited to reflect on how they themselves might adapt in a midwifer
5. Ultimately midwives interested in global health will better weigh their potential risks and benefits in moving their midwifery career forward in the direction of global midwifery education.

Tuesday, May 22, 2018 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Retrospective use of a Physologic Partograph Protocol to Identify Opportunities for Safely Decreasing Cesareans among Nulliparous Women with Spontaneous Labor Onset
Tuesday, May 22, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Jeremy Neal

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
No description available at time of publication



The Effects of Placental Transfusion on 12-Month Brain Myelin Content in Term Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Tuesday, May 22, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Debra Erickson-Owens

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:

Purpose

To determine if infants, at 12-months of age, who received a full placental transfusion at birth differ in myelin volume and developmental outcomes compared to infants who receive no placental transfusion.

Hypothesis

Healthy, term infants who receive a full placental transfusion via delayed cord clamping (DCC) will have greater brain myelin volume and better neurodevelopmental outcomes compared to infants who receive no placental transfusion (immediate cord clamping) (ICC) at 12-months of age.

Background

ICC continues to be the usual OB practice in the US. This results in leaving ~30% of the fetal-placental iron-rich blood behind in the placenta and puts an infant at risk for lower iron stores. Evidence (animal and human) suggests iron is critical to early brain white matter development as it plays a significant role in myelin formation.

Methods

A prospective randomized controlled trial. Seventy-three term pregnant women with singleton fetuses were enrolled and randomized to either ICC (<20 secs) or DCC (> 5 minutes). At 4 and 12-months, the infants had hemoglobin and ferritin levels measured and underwent a non-sedated MRI and neurodevelopmental testing.

Findings

Maternal and infant demographics were not different between groups. Mean cord clamping time was 318 + 158 [DCC] vs. 10 + 5 [ICC] seconds, p <0.0001. At 4-months, infants who received DCC had higher ferritin levels (91 + 57 vs. 61 + 30 ng/mL, p <0.04). At 12-months, infants randomized to DCC had significantly greater brain myelin volume in the following brain regions: Left & Right (R) internal capsule, R parietal, R occipital, R frontal and R orbital areas. The DCC group had a slightly higher social-emotional performance using the BITSEA Competence score (17 + 3 vs. 15 + 3, p=0.08). No differences were seen in ferritin or hemoglobin levels between groups at 12-months.

Discussion

At 12-months, placental transfusion at birth appears to increase brain myelin volume in regions involving motor and visual/spatial pathways and sensory processing. Neurodevelopmental testing suggests a trend of better social/emotional outcomes associated with DCC.

Conclusions

The endowment of iron-rich blood obtained through DCC may offer a longitudinal advantage for early white matter development.

 

 




The Relationship Between Stressful Life Events, Protective Factors, and Depression in Mothers Caring for Young Children in the South Bronx
Tuesday, May 22, 5:30PM - 6:30PM
Presented by:
Barbara Hackley

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Leadership, Racism and Disparities
Session Description:

Understanding factors contributing to maternal depression can be used to improve programs designed to promote maternal strengths and reduce stress, thereby improving maternal and child outcomes. In this study, a convenience sample of women (N=151) residing in some of the poorest congressional districts in the nationa were asked to complete an anonymous survey on protective and risk factors for maternal depression. Regression models were run to describe the relationship between stressful life events, coping strategies, and social factors and symptoms of depression and anxiety; these models accounted for one-third of the variance in scores on the PHQ-4.


Tuesday, May 22, 2018 6:15PM - 7:15PM
Conflicts of Conscience: The midwife's professional role and personal responsibility
Tuesday, May 22, 6:15PM - 7:15PM
Presented by:
Amy Levi, CNM, WHNP-BC, PhD

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:

What do we do when our personal beliefs conflict with those of our patients, our colleagues, or our professional organization?  What does it mean when we are expected to care for others who make choices that we find objectionable? This session will explore areas of potential conflicts of conscience, and present ways in which we can be guided by our professional responsibilities, as well as tools for managing these conflicts with others.  Participants will be guided through a series of role plays to explore best practices for communication and managing moral distress.

Objectives:
1. At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to identify the principles that define the professional responsibility of a midwife in ethically challenging situations.
2. At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to discuss sources of conflict for midwives in providing care.
3. At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to indicate ways to engage professionally when there is a conflict with the midwife’s own beliefs.:
4. At the end of this presentation, participants should be able to describe approaches to managing conversations that occur in conflicted situations.



Developing a Technology Enhanced Peripheral Brain for 21st Century Practice
Tuesday, May 22, 6:15PM - 7:15PM
Presented by:
Missi Stec, CNM, DNP, APRN, FACNM, FAAN
Megan Arbour, CNM, PhD, FACNM


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Education, Miscellaneous
Session Description:

In the fast-paced health care environment, technology allows practitioners to be efficient and effective providers within their patient encounters while working toward the quad aim of improving outcomes, improving provider satisfaction, decreasing health care cost and improving patient satisfaction. This session is designed to give midwives tools for practice based on the idea of the peripheral brain. Many midwives have established a collection of resources that assist in practice by pinpointing practice guidelines, important pharmacology and diagnostic references.  This session will cover choosing the right technology enhanced peripheral brain and resources for all midwifery settings from primary care through intrapartum.

Objectives:
1. Understand the SAMR model for technology integration.
2. Identify at least 3 apps or resources that can be integrated into practice.
3. Brainstorm one platform to be used as technology enhanced peripheral brain.
4. Critically evaluate apps for practice



Results from the National Midwifery Burnout Survey
Tuesday, May 22, 6:15PM - 7:15PM
Presented by:
Elisabeth Thumm, PhD, CNM, MBA

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Business
Session Description:

Professional burnout is associated with poor outcomes for patients and health care providers. In April 2017 the largest burnout survey of certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives in history (n=3,442) was conducted to examine the prevalence of professional burnout within our profession and identify characteristics of the midwifery work environment associated with burnout. In this session, we will discuss the results of this study including the causes of burnout unique to CNMs/CMs, how midwives compare to other professions, and begin to develop strategies to protect ourselves, our profession, and our patients from midwifery burnout.




Sex Positivity in Clinical Practice Part 2: Case Studies and Scripting for Common Scenarios
Tuesday, May 22, 6:15PM - 7:15PM
Presented by:
Stephanie Tillman, CNM, MSN

CEUs = 1
Rx = 30
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

"Sex positivity" is radical acceptance of sex or sexual expression rooted in safety, consent, and pleasure. Clinicians seeking to provide a safe space for all people seeking information, empowerment, and support in their sex lives must be knowledgable about ways to do so. This presentation will be a continuation from last year, with a brief review of history and terminology, and a main focus on case studies and examples of scripted language to be inclusive and empowering, even in when embarking on new conversations with patients. The case studies will include variations in relationship and sexual encounter types, continued evolutions in gender and sexual expression, solo sex and self pleasure, the role of orgasms, discussions with adolescents, and kink.

Objectives:
1. Define common terms and differences between sex, gender, sexual expression, sexual orientation, and relationship types and sexual partnerships.
2. Discuss the histories of sex positivity, consent, and coercion, and their most recent definitions and application to clinical practice.
3. Consider example clinical case studies and engage in open dialogue with other attendees about sex positivity as a way to begin practicing language to return to clinical practice.
4. Demonstrate how to talk about sexual pleasure, solo sex, and orgasms in the clinical setting.
5. As part of open dialogue around case studies, engage in exercises related to values clarification and cultural considerations.



The Birthing Community's Role in Reducing Racial Disparities in Maternal Health
Tuesday, May 22, 6:15PM - 7:15PM
Presented by:
Maddy Oden, CLD

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Racism and Disparities
Session Description:
Doulas, midwives, childbirth educators, and others in the birthing community have the power to reduce preventable maternal deaths by educating women on safe practices and empowering them to demand fully informed consent during childbirth. This session includes a viewing of a short documentary a drug commonly used for labor induction. This session will also discuss the recent Congressional Briefing on Capitol Hill Protecting America’s Mothers: Lessons from France, the U.K., and the U.S. on Reducing Maternal Mortality reasons behind racial disparities in U.S. maternal mortality rates and what we can do to help protect women during childbirth.



To Screen or Not to Screen: Counseling Your Patients about Prenatal Genetic Screening Using the Shared Decision-Making Model
Tuesday, May 22, 6:15PM - 7:15PM
Presented by:
Elisa Patterson, PhD, CNM
Gillian Brautigam


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
With the advent of cell free DNA (cfDNA) testing, prenatal genetic screening has become increasingly popular at the same time it has become increasingly difficult to explain to patients. However, it is crucial that patients are adequately counseled in a timely fashion regarding the risks, benefits, limitations and differences among the various noninvasive versus invasive testing options. This presentation will identify key elements of prenatal genetic counseling that midwives should master in order to provide adequate informed consent. We will present these key elements within the shared decision-making model. We will also discuss strategies to tailor screening to specific patient populations with sensitivity to differences in literacy level, socioeconomic background, culture and ethnicity. The discussion will address whether or not to screen, and how to accurately explain positive or negative test results. By the end of the presentation, participants will gain essential tools to provide comprehensive, patient-centered genetic counseling through our use of various informed consent examples and case studies.
Objectives:
1. 1. Each participant will better understand how to assess a patient’s literacy level and sociodemographic background to tailor counseling about prenatal genetic testing options specifically to the patient’s situation, increase risk comprehension, and reduc
2. 2. Each participant will learn how to decipher and compare various informed consent (IC) documents for prenatal genetic testing with the ultimate goal of identifying key components that need to be conveyed during counseling. There will be a focus on participants identifying a high quality IC tool that is useful with their specific patient population.
3. 3. Each participant will gain a basic understanding of shared decision-making tools to employ this model when providing prenatal genetic counseling.
4. 4. Each participant will acquire tools to provide comprehensive prenatal genetic counseling using the shared decision-making model. This includes informed consent of the risks, benefits and limitations of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT), discussing to

Wednesday, May 23, 2018 8:30AM - 9:30AM
Social Justice Panel: Advocacy in Action to Promote Health and Social Justice in Maternity Care
Wednesday, May 23, 8:30AM - 9:30AM
Presented by:
Abigail Omolayo Aiyepola, N.D, L.M
Monica Simpson
Leseliey Welch


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Public Perception
Session Description:
As we continue to confront the appalling US maternal mortality rates and health disparities in combination with structural racism, the call to action has been loud, but the outcomes have been less clear. This panel of birth advocates will speak to the opportunities and challenges they have addressed within their organizations to respond to these challenges and make a difference in the communities they serve.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018 9:45AM - 10:45AM
(Un)Certain Terms: an Update of Shared Decision-Making in Midwifery Care
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Michele Megregian, CNM, MSN

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Shared decision-making is the process by which providers and patients make health care choices together, in congruence with patient values and satisfaction, and provider expertise.  Traditional shared decision-making relies upon clear evidence regarding clinical options.  However, there is a strong element of the absence of clear evidence in maternity care, which can diminish informed choice and augment decisional conflict.  Shared decision-making under the condition of unclear evidence opens the opportunity for new ways of interaction and decision-making.  Midwives are uniquely qualified to support patients in shared decision-making in innovative ways.
Objectives:
1. Describe the concept of shared decision-making and how its definition and implementation have changed over time
2. Be familiar with and understand the ACNM Position Statement on Shared Decision-Making
3. Be familiar with strategies for implementing optimal shared decision-making in clinical practice



A Provider's Guide to Providing Informed Individual Choices for Prenatal Screening and Diagnostic Testing: Maintaining a Shared Decision-Making Process With our Patients
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Sharon Adams, CNM, DNP,ARNP
Emily Kidd, BSN Student


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Prenatal screening and diagnostic tests have been available within the clinical setting for more than 30 years and have evolved over time with improvements in detections rates of aneuploidy and chromosomal abnormalities.  Delaying childbearing is becoming more frequent with education and career goals and this contributes to the risk factor of advanced maternal age (age 35 or older at birth) with an increased risk for Trisomy 21 (Down's Syndrome) and Trisomy 18 (Edwards Syndrome).  All pregnant women should have the opportunity for risk assessment, counseling, and a shared decision-making process based upon her beliefs, values, and individual clinical circumstances.  This proposed special interest session presents resources for key screening tools, counseling tips, and an algorithm to assist busy health care providers to provide these choices in a respectful and unbiased manner that is easily understood by the patient and her family.
Objectives:
1. At the end of this session the participants should be able to review individual risks for aneuploidy and chromosomal abnormalities and present them to the patient in a respectful manner that is easily understood.
2. At the end of this educational session the participants should be able to review individual screening, diagnostic testing, or no screening choices with the patient.
3. At the end of this educational session the participants should be able to discuss the next step (diagnostic testing or not) if the screening tests are positive and also discuss any risks involved with the diagnostic tests.
4. At the end of this educational session the participants shall be able to discuss information on each aneuploidy or chromosomal abnormality covered by the test including prevalence, detection rate, false-positive rate, pregnancy implications, associated abnormalities, and prognosis.



ACNM Division of Global Health Panel:Developing Competencies for Midwives to Effectively Work in International Settings
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Robyn Churchill, CNM, MSN
Amy Levi, CNM, WHNP-BC, PhD
Lauren Arrington, CNM
Barbara Anderson, CNM


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education, Global Midwifery, Racism and Disparities
Session Description:

Midwives interested in global health want to know more about getting involved, to meet growing demand for midwife educators, TAs and consultants. ACNM members have expressied interest in global careers. CNM/CM educational programs are necessarily focused on US-based clinical care and practice issues to prepare midwives for work in the US.  A standard learning pathway or guidance for a midwife to choose an experience and develop skills to work effectively and ethically in international settings is needed. The panel will discuss international roles for US midwives, opportunities, and core competencies needed to begin or develop a career in international health.

Objectives:
1. Describe cultural and ethical considerations when providing midwifery care in countries or communities which are not our own
2. Demonstrate understanding of how midwifery care can be affected in resource-limited settings, including emergency settings and in care of refugee women, recognizing the health disparities and inequities that exist for these groups.
3. Identify primary areas of work in international settings or with refugees US midwives are engaged in and list core competencies required for each
4. Be able to list resources for developing the needed skills, through formal and informal learning, to contribute effectively and ethically to midwifery in international settings



AIM Bundles are Being Implemented Nationwide and Midwives Must be Involved!
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Elaine Germano, CNM, DRPH, FACNM

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

In 2011, ACOG with ACNM and other partners formed the Council on Patient Safety in Women’s Health Care to improve patient safety in women’s health care through multidisciplinary collaboration that drives culture change. The Alliance for Innovations in Maternity Care (AIM) Project has been piloting these quality improvement bundles in targeted states and is now striving to disseminate them more broadly. Brief descriptions of these QI safety bundles will be presented as well as why and midwives must get involved at a leadership level in each state.  Updates from AIM states will be highlighted. Time for Q&A will be allotted.

Objectives:
1. Learners will be aware of the objectives and activities of the Alliance for Innovation on Maternal Health (AIM) project.
2. Learners will be familiar with available AIM bundles and how to access AIM resources.
3. Learners will be aware of the importance of ACNM Affiliate leaders’ involvement in statewide perinatal safety/quality improvement initiatives.
4. Learners will receive updates about successes and challenges in targeted AIM states from ACNM AIM state leaders.
5. Learners will be familiar with how to incorporate the bundles into educational curricula for engaging students, nurses and residents.
6. Learners will be aware of how midwives can become engaged in the AIM project and utilize its associated materials to lead and engage in quality and safety initiatives in their practice settings.



An optimal approach: Midwifery Care for Women with Pregnancies Complicated by Life-Limiting Anomalies or Fetal Losses
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Ami Goldstein, CNM, FNP, MSN

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Diagnosis of a fetal anomaly considered to be lethal or an intrauterine fetal demise can be devastating both for families and providers. By developing a skill set that incorporates best practices around pregnancies complicated by loss, midwives can be the optimal care providers for these women and families. They also can provide continued palliative care if and when the infants are able to return home. Midwives may also assist with the forgotten aspect of loss: mothers who desire to pump and donate breastmilk.
Objectives:
1. Identify challenges and rewards for midwives providing care for families experiencing a pregnancy with a life limiting anomaly or a loss.
2. Identify frequency of conditions such as Trisomy 13, Trisomy 18, anencephaly, or renal agenesis and describe ranges of extrauterine survival time. Identify incidence of intrauterine fetal demise and primary risk factors.
3. Discuss routine counseling for these conditions and review options regarding continuing a pregnancy versus termination, including risks and benefits of both. Discuss challenges of opting for induction while the fetus is still living or waiting for labor or death.
4. Identify components of routine prenatal and intrapartum care that may be modified based on infant life expectancy. Discuss how to approach parents and integrate their desires into management for both mother and infant.
5. Define perinatal palliative care and discuss challenges providing this care outside of the hospital setting where it is more routine.
6. Discuss options for breastmilk management with a fetal or early neonatal loss including counseling, milk donation, and other care issues for women.



Beyond Benchmarking: Using Benchmarking Data to Drive Practice and Quality Improvement
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Cathy Emeis, CNM, PhD

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The increasing shift toward initiatives aimed at improving the quality, efficiency, and overall value of health care underscore the importance of documentation of the quality and value of midwifery care. The ACNM Benchmarking Project was designed in 2004 with a goal of documenting quality indicators that reflect  important midwifery clinical process and outcomes.  Currently, aggregate midwifery practice level data is voluntarily reported on an annual basis enabling participating practices to compare themselves to practices similar in size and environment. Thinking beyond benchmarking as an annual activity enables midwives to use the benchmarking process to identify opportunities for quality improvement and sets the stage for practice improvement projects.. This session uses actual ACNM Benchmarking data examples to demonstrate how midwives can use their Benchmarking data to identify concerning practice trends and design a practice improvement project aimed at improving outcomes of care.
Objectives:
1. Summarize the objectives of the ACNM Benchmarking project
2. Describe the implications for midwifery practices as a result of the shift from pay for service to pay for performance.
3. List  three ways for practices to utilize BM data to advance quality improvement.
4. Describe the relationship of quarterly data monitoring to annual data reporting.



Beyond The Pink Pill: A Step-Wise Approach to Female Sexual Interest/Arousal Disorders
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Tammy Senn, CNM, WHNP, MSN

CEUs = 1
Rx = 20
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

Sexual dysfunction is a common complaint which may create significant personal and relational distress for women. This session will review female sexual response and DSM-5/ISSM criteria for disorders of desire and arousal.  A systematic treatment plan for sexual dysfunction includes: establishing goals for treatment, identifying and addressing underlying factors and co-morbid diagnoses, appropriate referrals, patient education, and evidence-based pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies.

Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, participants will be able to describe the clinical presentation, cultural influences, and DSM-5 criteria for disorders of desire and arousal.
2. At the end of the session, participants will be able describe models of female sexual response.
3. At the end of the session, participants will be able to identify factors that may interfere with female sexual response.
4. At the end of the session, participants will be able to list co-morbid conditions to assess for, when evaluating disorders of desire/arousal.
5. At the end of the session, participants will list steps for establishing an individualized treatment plan which addresses physical and psycho-social needs, utilizing a sex positive approach.
6. At the end of the session, participants will be able to choose appropriate, evidence-based pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment modalities.



Caring for Pregnant Clients with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Michele Augur, LM. CPM, MSM
Karen Hays, CNM, ARNP, DNP


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Racism and Disparities
Session Description:
Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a diagnosis that reflects an individual’s abilities to process sensory stimuli and participate in normative communication and social interactions. An increasing number of girls and women are being diagnosed as they enter or during their childbearing years. While women with ASD are often able to successfully adapt to social expectations and participate in typical life pursuits such as romantic relationships, parenting, and employment, they are also at risk for increased isolation, stress, anxiety, and depression when their autism-related needs are unsupported. Barriers to healthcare are commonly experienced by persons with ASD due to a lack of knowledge and sensitivity in the medical system, necessitating improvement in care practices to promote diversity, gender equality, and individual autonomy. Caring for clients with ASD necessitates accommodating sensory, social/communication, and planning/decision-making needs. Many individuals with ASD do not have chronic physical health concerns, and would therefore be ideal low-risk candidates for midwifery services. Midwives’ philosophy of care and scope of practice are well-situated to provide holistic continuity of care while offering a sensitive, inclusive approach for neurodiverse clients. This presentation will introduce a new practice guideline designed to assist midwives to provide appropriate reproductive healthcare for women with ASD.
Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to define ASD and recognize possible signs that a client may have characteristics associated with ASD.
2. Participants will be able to list 3 potential challenges a client with ASD may have with maternity care that may be distinct from neurotypical clients.
3. Participants will be able to describe 6 considerations a midwife should discuss with and plan for when caring for a client with autism antenatally, intrapartum, and postpartum.



Context and Clinical Care: Applying the IOM Report on Social Determinants of Health to Teaching Midwifery
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Victoria Baker, PhD, CNM, MS, MSPH

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education, Racism and Disparities
Session Description:
The Institute of Medicine (IOM) issued a 2016 report urging health professional educators to incorporate the social determinants of health into training our workforce at every level, including clinicians, administrators, educators, researchers, and policy makers.  The IOM study on a framework to support teaching health professionals about social determinants of health was commissioned because “[e]ducating health professionals about the social determinants of health generates awareness of the potential root causes of ill health and the importance of addressing them in and with communities. … [and leads] to more effective strategies for improving health and health care for underserved populations now and in the future.” (Committee on Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health, Board on Global Health, Institute of Medicine, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 2016, pp. 1-2)  Taking into account the social determinants of health improves our care of individuals and helps us achieve health equity at a population level.  This session helps midwifery educators answer that call.
Objectives:
1. Participants will apply the social determinants of health to clinical problems, paying particular attention to issues of health equity.
2. Participants will apply Institute of Medicine recommended frameworks and other frameworks and approaches to teaching social determinants of health to midwifery students.
3. Participants will identify resources to teach social determinants of health in light of their own teaching needs.



Do We Teach How They Learn?  Exploring Faculty and Student Teaching and Learning with Technology
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Missi Stec, CNM, DNP, APRN, FACNM, FAAN
Heather Findletar Hines, CNM, DNP


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Session Description:

Traditional teaching pedagogy involved stringent lectures followed by formative and summative assessments. Research shows that only 50% of students are able to think and learn in this manner.  So, what about the other 50%? This session will explore assessment of learning style and how technology-enhanced, evidence based pedagogy can assist the faculty in meeting students where they learn.  This type of approach can increase student learning and retention while improving faculty satisfaction in the classroom.




Ethics, Technology, and Ableism in Antenatal Testing
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Ira Kantrowitz-Gordon, CNM, PhD
Meghan Eagen-Torkko, PhD, CNM
Kimberly Allard, CNM, MN, MSW


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The technology of antenatal screening and diagnostic methods is advancing quickly. In an environment where such advances are often considered an unmitigated good, it is necessary to reflect on such progress in order to be mindful of unanticipated consequences. While ultrasound and other testing can help to optimize prenatal care, it also increases the potential for ethical dilemmas and for increased patient anxiety in the setting of uncertain results. We will consider issues of informed consent and decision making, disparities of testing availability with regard to social determinants of health, and the balance of maternal and fetal health interests.  Specific cases will be discussed by a panel representing diverse perspectives and approaches to these issues.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant will be able to identify three ethical dilemmas that may arise during antenatal testing and ultrasound.
2. At the end of the session the participant will be able to consider the challenges of informed consent and shared decision-making in the context of antenatal testing.
3. At the end of the session the participant will understand how culture, health disparities, and educational level may affect in decision-making for antenatal testing.
4. At the end of the session the participant will understand potential conflicts between values of social justice, reproductive freedom, and disability rights that emerge from antenatal testing.
5. At the end of the session the participant will be aware of the potential harms from antenatal testing and ultrasound.



Extended Role Transition: A Course Designed to Change the Learning Curves of Midwifery Students without Prior Intrapartum Employment
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Kathryn Woeber, PhD, CNM, MPH

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Education
Session Description:
Approximately half of all U.S. midwifery programs admit students without prior intrapartum employment experience.  In an effort to boost the knowledge and skills of these students prior to their midwifery clinical experiences, our program developed a course called Extended Role Transition.  This presentation will focus on course objectives, logistics, content, and student evaluation, and will address strategies used to promote student learning in the clinical area.
Objectives:
1. An understanding of how this course facilitates successful learning experiences of students from diverse backgrounds.
2. Knowledge about course design and logistics.
3. Strategies for ensuring student preparation for clinical experiences.
4. Strategies to ensure shared objectives between students, preceptors, and faculty.
5. Strategies for student evaluation.



From Clinical Practice to Publication: Writing Case Reports
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Linda Hunter, CNM, EdD, FACNM
Tekoa King, CNM, MPH, FACNM


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Case reports are one of the oldest storytelling traditions in the healthcare literature. Presenting a case that is unusual, educational, or highlights an area with alternative approaches to patient care provides a source of information that focuses on best practice. Seeing clinical care through the lens of a real-life patient scenario then links this experience to the current evidence and plays an important role in advancing knowledge.  Using a fairly structured format, case reports provide a solid foundation for manuscript preparation and submission. For this reason, they are a perfect publication option for novice writers.  This session will prepare attendees to write a case report for publication with helpful tips and examples. Need some motivation and help to write about an interesting case? Bring your ideas and writing aspirations to this small group session for some inspiration and support from editors of the Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health.
Objectives:
1. Discuss the educational value of case reports in advancing midwifery knowledge.
2. Recognize examples of clinical situations that would make excellent case reports.
3. Describe the steps involved in writing a Clinical Rounds case report for submission to the Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health.



Integrative Midwifery for the Underserved
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Janelle Komorowski, DNP, CNM

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Integrative medicine approaches illness and disease by emphasizing the therapeutic relationship and taking an wholistic approach to health care, rather than treating symptoms alone.  In its efforts to treat the whole patient, integrative medicine mirrors aspects of the midwifery model of care, and when applied to the care of women might better be termed "integrative midwifery". Although underserved populations could significantly benefit from an integrative midwifery approach, cost and time constraints are two persistent barriers.  This presentation will explore application of the principles of integrative medicine to midwifery care and innovative strategies for eliminating barriers to providing this care to the underserved.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to describe the integrative medicine philosophy of patient care.
2. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to list five common women's health concerns where an integrative midwifery approach should be the first approach to care.
3. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to identify four strategies for removing barriers to provision of integrative midwifery care for the underserved.
4. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to  identify three resources for preparing the midwife to provide evidence-based integrative midwifery care.
5. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to list three strategies for obtaining reimbursement for integrative midwifery services to underserved women.



International Midwifery Learning Exchange
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Penny Marzalik, PhD, CNM, IBCLC

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education, Global Midwifery, Racism and Disparities
Session Description:
The International Midwifery Learning Exchange presentation is for midwives and educators interested in planning or participating in study abroad learning exchanges between two midwifery educational programs. Type and length of exchange, resources needed and anticipated outcomes for intercultural competence are discussed. The option for a virtual exchange is included.
Objectives:
1. 1.  Appreciate the importance of gaining cultural awareness and humility through an international midwifery learning exchange.
2. 2. Identify processes for gaining cultural awareness and humility through an international midwifery learning exchange.
3. 3. Identify the components of planning an international midwifery learning exchange including type and length of exchange, resources needed and timeline.
4. 4. Describe a virtual learning exchange alternative to an international study abroad learning exchange.



Is the Midwife on the Birth Certificate? Why All Midwives Should be Active Participants in Improving Birth Certificate Accuracy.
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Erin Biscone, CNM, DNP
Kendra Adkisson, CNM, MSN


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Public Perception
Session Description:
Analysis of birth certificate data indicate that information about the provider type is not always accurate, and that CNM/CMs may not be named on a large percentage of the birth certificates for births they attend. In this session we will explore the importance of birth certificate data to the public perception and influence of midwives, how birth certificate data is gathered and reported, and where and when errors are most likely to occur. We will also learn about tactics midwives can employ to increase accuracy of birth certificates for the babies they catch, as well strategies for advocacy at the local, state, and national levels.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to identify why having accurate data on birth certificates, including the provider type, is critical to advancing midwifery in the United States.
2. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to demonstrate knowledge of evidence from Texas and Kentucky that CNM/CM births are being undercounted
3. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to demonstrate understanding of how birth certificate data is typically collected in US hospitals, and who is responsible for submitting it.
4. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to demonstrate knowledge about areas in the system of collection of birth certificate data where errors are most likely to occur, and what midwives can do to reduce the likelihood of error.
5. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to identify potential partners for advocacy around policy change for collection and management of birth certificate data at the local/institution, state, and national levels.



Lessons Learned by the Organizers of the Massachusetts Midwives Summit; The Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How to Convene a Successful Summit
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Kelly Roberts, MSN
Michele Helgeson, CNM, MPH


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Leadership, Midwifery Matters - Business, Racism and Disparities
Session Description:
If you are motivated to move midwifery forward in your state or community and wonder how to do it, a Summit may be a good solution. This presentation will guide you through the trials and tribulations of preparing for the big event, and share valuable insights and action plans gleaned from the first ever Massachusetts Midwives Summit. From choosing a theme, setting goals, staying on course, collaborating with midwife and non-midwife experts, scheduling the venue, selecting speakers, inviting participants, applying for grants and CEUs, managing the budget, purchasing supplies, renting equipment, recruiting help, and post-Summit work, we'll share everything we learned, as well as mistakes we made along the way, to ensure a well-run and successful midwifery summit. Bring a hard-working, reliable, compatible friend - you'll need a great partner to make your summit a reality!
Objectives:
1. At the end of this session participants should be able to describe the catalysts and goals for the first Massachusetts Midwives Summit.
2. At the end of this session participants should be able to list key steps that facilitated collaboration imperative throughout the planning phases of the Summit.
3. At the end of this session participants should be able to describe the process of SMART goal setting, SWOT brainstorming and analysis, and the importance of ongoing evaluation of progress toward goals.
4. At the end of this session participants should be able to explain the imperative of why and how discussions of health inequities/disparities and racial/social justice issues were incorporated into every Summit session.
5. At the end of this session participants should be able to list key outcomes of the Massachusetts Midwives Summit and how they inform a strategic plan for increasing access to midwifery care in Massachusetts hospitals.
6. At the end of this session participants should understand the steps involved and how long it took to plan, implement and evaluate the Massachusetts Midwives Summit.



Midwifing the Midwife: re-entry of the minimally, moderately, and extensively experienced clinician after a gap in clinical practice.
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Nicole Mercer, MSN, CNM, FNP-C
Melissa Davis, CNM, FNP, DNP


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Business
Session Description:
Returning to work after a gap in clinical practice can be daunting to many midwives and can likewise present credentialing and orienting challenges to employers and institutions.  New evidence, rusty skills, practice changes, methods of screening, and continuously changing electronic medical records are a few of the areas that can cause unease for the returning midwife.  A carefully planned and implemented orientation schedule is key to the success of both the re-entrant and the practices’ success.  This orientation schedule should be individually planned for each midwife returning to practice. This presentation will guide the re-entering midwife through the process we have developed to facilitate success for all stakeholders.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session participants will be able to describe the guidelines outlined in the ACNM Re-Entry to Midwifery Practice reference document.
2. At the end of the session participants will demonstrate increased confidence in the ability to apply re-entry guidelines in an organized, meaningful, and efficient manner in the integration of a midwife after a practice gap.
3. At the end of the session participants will be able to develop individualized orientation plans based on clinician experience, scope of planned practice, organizational, state, and institutional guidelines, with consideration of key stakeholder input.



Peripartum Cardiomyopathy: A Women's Healthcare Providers Guide to Identifying Risk and Distinguishing Symptoms
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Andrew Youmans, CNM, CPEN, FAWM

CEUs = 1
Rx = 30
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

Peripartum cardiomyopathy is related to significant morbidity and mortality among pregnant and postpartum women. Cardiomyopathies and cardiovascular complications represent over 25% of maternal deaths in the United States. This presentation will cover the risk factors epidemiology, pathophysiology, and physical exam and diagnostic tests.  It will also discuss the impact of peripartum cardiomyopathy. This presentation will provide basic information to help midwives and women's healthcare providers and midwives recognize peripartum cardiomyopathy and cardiovascular issues in the clinical setting and discuss ways to differentiate peripartum cardiomyopathy from normal pregnancy symptoms.  

Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, the participant should be able to identify risk factors that increase a woman's risk for developing peripartum cardiomyopathy.
2. At the end of the session, the participant should be able to identify abnormal physical examination findings and basic diagnostic test results that increase suspicion for peripartum cardiomyopathy.
3. At the end of the session, participants will have an increased understanding of peripartum cardiomyopathy.



Prevention of Iron Deficiency Anemia in Young Women; Towards a Modern Approach
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Thomas Lloyd, MS, CNM

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
No description available at time of publication



Stress and the American Midwife: Causes, Impacts and Solutions
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Erin Wright, CNM, APHN-BC, DNP

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Work related stress among midwives is a global issue which affects midwives personally as well as the health of the communities they serve . In countries across the globe,  the topic of workforce stress and its implications for clinical practice have been studied at great length.  However, the sources and outcomes are different depending on the health care system, financial resources, level of midwifery training and caseload demands on the midwife .  In this session we will explore the factors contributing to work stress among midwives in these global setting as well as in the United States; a previously understudied geographic area.  In addition, we will discuss evidence-based methods for stress reduction in both  individual and systemic contexts, and engage in experiential learning of these methods. (no special clothing or equipment will be required for this session).  The cost effectiveness and feasibility of implementing these interventions, both  for the individual and in the health care delivery system setting will be examined.
Objectives:
1. The participant will describe three contributing factors to the work related stress levels of midwives in the United States.
2. The participant will describe three contributing factors to the work related stress levels of midwives in the Global setting
3. The participant will be able to list the personal and patient care outcomes related to stress in the work place
4. The patient will be able to describe 3 personal interventions for stress reduction
5. The participant will be able to describe 2 systematic interventions for stress reduction.
6. The participant will be able to describe feasibility issues for systematic stress reduction interventions



The Gut Microbiome and Gestational Weight Gain in African American Women: Implications for Research and Practice
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Sara Edwards, PhD, MN, MPH, CNM

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Racism and Disparities, Miscellaneous
Session Description:

Nearly 80% of African American (AA) women of childbearing age report themselves to be overweight or obese, by far the highest of all races.  The gut microbiome has been linked to body weight in non-pregnant populations but there is a dearth of research of the gut microbiome across pregnancy. This study will describe the composition and diversity of the gut microbiome across pregnancy in healthy AA women by BMI category delivering term, singleton infants.  Given the potential to modify the gut microbiome with dietary and other lifestyle changes, a better understanding of its contribution to a healthy pregnancy is essential.

Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant should be able to demonstrate understanding of the incidence and implications of racial disparities in weight among childbearing age and pregnant women in the United States.
2. At the end of the session the participant should be able to demonstrate understanding of the composition and diversity of the gut microbiome across pregnancy in healthy AA women by BMI category.
3. At the end of the session the participant should be able to demonstrate understanding of the relationship between the gut microbiome and weight gain across pregnancy in AA women, including known interracial differences.
4. At the end of the session the participant should be able to demonstrate understanding of the implications of prepregnant weight and gestational weight gain on racial disparities in obstetric outcomes, postpartum weight retention and risk of chronic condit
5. At the end of the session the participant should be able to demonstrate understanding how to apply current research findings to assess and promote gut health and appropriate weight gain in pregnancy, with special considerations for AA women.



The Midwife in the Second Half of Life
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Karen McGee, Retired RN CNM, BSN MSN

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
The audience for this session are midwives anticipating age related life changes and are in the midst of seeking new ways of understanding their purpose in life.  This short presentation meets with Domain I of the ACNM Strategic Plan: Supporting our members.  The content will achieve a personal application to the navigation to retirement.  The session will act as a recognition for their work and a prompt to sustain their ungoing growth and involvement in our profession.
Objectives:
1. 1.  The participant will begin to accept the invitation to greater freedom, wholeness and a life grounded in what matters to the individual facing a new phase in life.
2. 2. The participant  will acknowledge that the second half of life can be characterized by creativity, growth and integration.
3. 3.  The participant will see the changes in their life as requiring cultivation and navigation through a not so linear process and will release the self to time for contemplation and integration of beliefs.
4. 4.   The participant will seek self knowledge through interconnectedness with all things and acknowledge that suffering can engender appreciation and gratitude.
5. 5.  The participant will identify practices that support growth and resiliency.
6. 6. The participant will seek an intentional community to discern, lament, mourn, appreciate, celebrate and act.



We're All In This Together: A Unique Approach to Interprofessional Education on Labor & Delivery
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Laura Jenson, CNM, MPH, MS, CPH

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
Teamwork is a critical component of patient safety on L&D, and research suggests that customization of interprofessional education and authenticity are important elements to achieving positive outcomes. We utilized an interdisciplinary approach to train new obstetric learners (Family Medicine and OB interns, CNM students and L&D RNs) on key topics including labor management, pain control, fetal monitoring, vaginal delivery and urgent Cesarean delivery with an emphasis on effective interdisciplinary communication strategies. Learners reported improved confidence about their ability to practice safely, their skills and their communication strategies. Positive comments emphasized appreciation for the interdisciplinary perspectives, networking, and feeling more empowered to work on L&D. Interdisciplinary obstetrics education early in training may improve confidence in the areas of medical knowledge, communication and clinical skills for teams managing routine and emergent obstetric scenarios.
Objectives:
1. To identify strategies to improve teamwork, communication, quality of care and safety for patients on the labor and delivery unit (L&D) through interprofessional education initiatives.
2. To identify strategies to develop and support an interprofessional training program.
3. To identify ways to evaluate the effectiveness and appropriateness of interprofessional education training.



Working to the full scope of Midwifery Practice in and out of hospital
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Michelle Palmer, CNM, MSN

CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Leadership, Midwifery Matters - Public Perception
Session Description:
Home and hospital practice have historically been perceived as separate entities in the United States. The International Definition of Midwifery states:"The midwife is recognised as a responsible and accountable professional who works in partnership with women to give the necessary support, care and advice during pregnancy, labour and the postpartum period, to conduct births on the midwife’s own responsibility and to provide care for the newborn and the infant' (ICM, 2017). Outside of the United States the midwife may be the only access to newborn care. Research has demonstrated better outcomes with seamless care between settings, it is rare for a home birth practice to have hospital privileges, and where obstetric privileges have been obtained it is rarer still for midwives to obtain newborn privileges. The midwife's role in the hospital setting has been commonly limited to the responsibility of care of the mother and infant dyad up to the point of birth and then care of the mother in the postpartum period. This presentation will review the steps taken to gain obstetric and newborn privileges in a hospital setting, to maintain continuity of care from home to hospital in the case of home birth transfer, and to expand the midwife role in the hospital setting. In addition to the ability to care for the family as a unit, the benefit of the midwifery philosophy on the normal newborn and a strengthening of inter-professional relationships, as well as strengthening of autonomous practice will be explored philosophically and economically. A multi-media approach will be utilized during this presentation and will include video and audio. In addition to striving for seamless care across different clinical practice settings, a case for recognition of the midwife as a viable resource in the nursery setting will be suggested.
Objectives:
1. At the end of this presentation participants will understand steps for gaining obstetric and newborn privileges in the hospital setting and how to best demonstrate the benefit of these privileges to the institution and inter-professional colleagues.
2. At the end of this presentation participants will gain understanding of the importance of maintaining newborn clinical skills as part of the midwife's scope of practice and role.
3. At the end of this presentation participants will be able to be able to discuss how seamless care between clinical settings impacts outcomes for mother and newborn as well as the family unit as a whole.



Writing Clinical Review Articles: Advice from the Editors
Wednesday, May 23, 9:45AM - 10:45AM
Presented by:
Francie Likis, DrPH, NP, CNM, FACNM, FAAN
Tekoa King, CNM, MPH, FACNM
Patricia Murphy, CNM, DrPH, FACNM, FAAN


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Miscellaneous
Session Description:
Evidence-based clinical review articles identify and synthesize current knowledge about a clinical topic. These popular articles summarize the literature and expert opinions to provide readers with clinical guidance. This session, led by editors of the Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health, provides advice and tips for the entire process of writing a clinical review article from choosing the topic to completing the manuscript.
Objectives:
1. Contrast the different types of review articles.
2. Choose an appropriate topic for a clinical review article.
3. Identify content for a clinical review article, including studies, non-research literature, and expert opinions.
4. Describe the sections of a clinical review manuscript, including differentiating the order in which they are presented versus written.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018 2:15PM - 3:15PM
2018 Global Health Hot Topics for Midwives
Wednesday, May 23, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Robyn Churchill, CNM, MSN
Lisa Noguchi, CNM, PhD
Mary Ellen Stanton, CNM, MSN, FACNM
Deborah Armbruster, CNM, MPH, FACNM


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:

CNMs/CMs learn about culturally appropriate care in U.S settings. In global health, midwives provide clinical care educate many types of providers, and effect health systems change.  Current information about these topics is not always available.  As CNMs/CMs increasingly engage in global work, including care of refugee women, they need the most recent information about global issues. 2018 Global Health Hot Topics for Midwives Panel will present the latest information in four areas – providing culturally appropriate care in global crisis settings, prevalent infectious disease recognition and treatment, global maternal health workforce challenges and role of midwives in health systems change

Objectives:
1. 1.     Describe cultural considerations of providing midwifery care to select world populations, including refugee women, recognizing the health disparities and inequities that exist for these groups
2. 2.     Summarize the latest information about the trends in, midwifery care of, and treatment of infectious diseases affecting women around the world, including infections such as zika, malaria, and HIV/AIDS
3. 3.     Discuss the status global maternal health workforce issues including size and skills of a midwifery and interprofessional workforce, as well as challenges in geographic location of midwives, educating a diverse workforce, and training midwives.
4. 4.     Explain the role of midwives in global health care systems and how midwives are currently affecting the quality of care in the global arena.



ACNM’s Gender Equity Task Force: Background, Resources, and Open Forum
Wednesday, May 23, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Stephanie Tillman, CNM, MSN
Ruth Zielinski, PhD, CNM


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

The Gender Equity Task Force is charged with examining member education, online and print resources, and language in ACNM documents. This Task Force was borne out of a recognition of an evolving queer and trans membership in the College, changing patient communities and midwifery care needs, and intentional movements toward sexual and reproductive justice and inclusivity within the broader gynecologic and obstetric community. This presentation and panel discussion will review the work of the Task Force, ACNM member resources, and next steps. Following the panel presentation will be an open forum for questions related to the work of the Task Force as well as dialogue regarding gender and sexuality in midwifery education, training, and care provision.

Objectives:
1. Define and differentiate key terms related to gender, sexuality, and apply this understanding to midwifery care of people all along regardless of gender or sexual identity.
2. Identify language within the current midwifery community that conflicts with patient-centered care of all gender and sexual identities, and name complementary terms and words that facilitate inclusivity in midwifery care.
3. Recognize the complexities within Scope of Practice that midwives navigate to provide competent, non-judgmental care inclusive to all people regardless of sexual or gender identity.
4. Describe the objectives of the Gender Equity Task Force (GETF) and identify resources available within ACNM and collaborating organizations to assist with care of people with diverse sexual identities and people who identify outside of the gender binary.
5. Demonstrate skills related to comprehensive health history taking, which includes patient-centered ways of including questions about gender and sexuality, and creating a safe space for all people regardless of sexual or gender identity, to engage effectively with colleagues and clients.



Adherence to New Treatment Guidelines for Vulvovaginal Candidiasis
Wednesday, May 23, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Mark Martens, MD

CEUs = 1
Rx = 45
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This session will discuss key elements of the CDC and other medical guidelines for treatment of vulvuvaginal candidiasis (VVC) compared to current clinical practice by CNMs, NPs and OBGYNs. The program will focus on specific patient populations who are impacted by these findings, including pregnant and diabetic women.
Objectives:
1. Elucidate key elements of the CDC and ISSVD guidelines related to the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC).
2. Describe the results of a survey about the prescribing habits of 200 OBGYNs, 200 CNMs/NPs, and 50 PCPs, when treating VVC, including treatment choice for specific patient types (pregnant, diabetic), and dosing.
3. Compare these findings to current guidelines.
4. Discuss the case for further health professional education in this area.



Clinical Strategies for Addressing Maternal Obesity
Wednesday, May 23, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Monica Ketchie, DNP, CNM, ANP
Josie Doss, PhD, MSN, RN


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This presentation will address the current state of the science related to maternal obesity. An evidence-based background will provide participants with the following information: 1) trends, 2) an overview of maternal and fetal/infant complications, and 3) professional recommendations regarding counseling and interventions during pre-conception and gestational periods. An evaluation of barriers will guide a discussion addressing how providers can create an environment that will motivate and support positive changes in nutrition and physical activity. And finally presenters will use evidence-based literature to identify appropriate approaches to opening conversations and providing counseling to overweight and obese women of childbearing age in a way that will encourage changes in behavior that will result in pre-conception weight loss or limited gestational weight gain in an effort to improve both maternal and fetal outcomes. Implications for practice: Implementation of evidence-based strategies that will motivate and support positive changes in nutrition and physical activity prior to and during pregnancy may result in improved pregnancy outcomes for mothers and their offspring.
Objectives:
1. The learner will be able to discuss the following background information: 1. Incidence of overweight and obesity in women of childbearing age 2. Complications associated with excess maternal weight prior to and during pregnancy 3. Professional recommendat
2. The learner will be able to create an environment that will motivate and support positive changes in maternal nutrition and physical activity by: 1. Recognizing present clinical barriers and provider bias that may inhibit provision of care 2. Describing obesity related risk factors 3. Discuss the use of motivational interviewing
3. The learner will be able to Integrate evidence based strategies into daily practice that will address excess maternal weight and improve outcomes for mother and baby by 1. Identifying and discussing evidence-based pre-conception counseling and interventions for weight loss. 2. Identifying and discussing evidence-based counseling techniques and interventions to limit gestational weight gain.



Neonatal Weight Matters: An Examination of Weight Changes in Full-Term Breastfeeding Newborns During the First 2 Weeks of Life
Wednesday, May 23, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Diane DiTomasso, PhD, RN

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Education
Session Description:

The gap that was addressed in this study is the lack of definitive evidence about the expected weight loss patterns for breastfeeding newborns. Our findings showed that more than half of the healthy, full-term breastfeeding newborns in this study lost greater than 7% body weight after birth, a standard set by the American Academy of Pediatrics. For newborns who lost greater than 7% body weight, exclusive breastfeeding rates at 2 weeks of age were significantly lower compared to newborns who lost < 7%.

Objectives:
1. The learner will list 3 problems related to data collection in research studies focused on newborn weight changes.
2. The learner will identify weight loss patterns for full term breastfeed neonates.
3. The learner will describe the impact of weight loss > 7% on exclusive breastfeeding rates.



The Effects of Oral Contraceptive Pills on Sexual Pain and Dysfunction
Wednesday, May 23, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Kathy Herron, CNM, MS

CEUs = 1
Rx = 30
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

Oral contraceptive pills are an excellent choice for some women and have many health benefits. In some cases, however, OCP use can lead to sexual dysfunction and pain. This session will discuss the physiologic basis for this, including which pills are more likely to cause an issue and which women are more likely to be affected. Midwives will learn to identify and treat these women. Physical examination, laboratory tests, medications, and complementary therapies will be discussed.

Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, the participant should be able to describe the classifications of female sexual dysfunctions and understand the related anatomy and physiology.
2. At the end of the session, the participant should be able to describe the effects of hormones, particularly oral contraceptive pills, on female sexual function and dysfunction.
3. At the end of the session, the participant should understand how to take a comprehensive sexual pain history.
4. At the end of the session, the participant should understand the physical exams and tests used to diagnose hormonally-mediated sexual pain.
5. At the end of the session, the participant should be able to describe standard and complementary treatment options for women experiencing sexual dysfunction from oral contraceptive pills.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Our Power Within: Contemplative Practices Reduce Racism and Bias
Wednesday, May 23, 3:00PM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Laura Bennett, CNM, MSN

CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Leadership, Racism and Disparities
Session Description:
Reducing racism and bias in our culture is essential to improving the health of our nation on both physical and social levels. Racism contributes to myriad health problems in its sufferers within our society including preterm birth and its consequences, increased cellular aging, inflammation, cardiovascular disease, metabolic disturbances, sleep disorder, cognitive decline, later diagnosis of disease, and shortened life span. Minorities face inequity in healthcare including poorer access to care and quality of care, fewer health preserving health recommendations, inadequate pain management, and fewer diagnostic services for serious health problems. They are also less likely to receive life and function preserving therapies, as well as the standard treatment plans for care while hospitalized. Bias against people due to sexuality, religion, and socioeconomic status also result in health disparities. Neuroscientific evidence has uncovered that we all have implicit biases, automatic neural and physiologic responses, that occur beneath our awareness and affect our thoughts, attitudes, and behaviors toward people. Biases tend negatively toward “other” groups, including other races. Biases in healthcare providers have serious implications to the provision of quality healthcare. Sociocultural factors play a role in whether or not our implicit biases are perpetuated or are manifested as explicit biases and prejudicial behaviors. Research has demonstrated that mindfulness and compassion practices alter the neural firing patterns associated with bias and racism, and that the practices reduce bias and discrimination. Understanding our nature and taking part in these contemplative practices that develop our awareness and sensitivity give us power to heal racism and prejudice in healthcare and in society.
Objectives:
1. Define implicit bias
2. Define explicit bias
3. Name two brain regions associated with implicit bias.
4. Describe mindfulness meditation.
5. Describe how mindfulness practices may reduce racism and bias.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Good Grief! Bacterial Vaginosis Again? What's new in BV diagnosis and treatment? Hope for Women, Relief for Providers!
Wednesday, May 23, 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Barbara Hughes, CNM, MS, MBA, FACNM, NE-BC

CEUs = 1
Rx = 30
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

This session reviews the current evidence about the incidence, diagnosis and management of bacterial vaginosis. An innovative new treatment option for BV has been approved by the FDA which will add to your treatment toolkit.

Objectives:
1. By the end of the session participants will have a better understanding of the incidence of BV and recurrent BV and the impact on women's lives, including women in menopause and women of color
2. By the end of the session participants will have a better understanding of the diagnosis of BV
3. By the end of the session participants will have a better understanding of traditional treatment methodologies for BV
4. By the end of the session participants will have a better understanding of an emerging treatment option for BV



Let's Talk about Vaccines!
Wednesday, May 23, 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Carol Hayes, CNM, MN, MPH
Nicole Rouhana, PhD, FACNM, FNP-BC
Niessa Meier, DNP, CNM
Pamela Meharry, PhD, CNM


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

This presentation will present evidence on how to address vaccine hesitancy in pregnant women, especially women of color, as well as a panel discussion on putting this evidence into practice. The panel consists of midwives who have demonstrated a commitment to improving immunizations rates in women,

Objectives:
1. Discuss data of racial disparities in immunizations rates
2. Discuss the current CDC recommendations of vaccines in pregnancy
3. Discuss data on communication strategies for addressing women who are hesitant to receive immunizations
4. Discuss women’s perceptions of disease severity and vaccine safety
5. Discuss techniques that panelists have used in their practice to address vaccine hesitancy



Stemming the Tide of Congenital Syphilis: The Role of Nurse Midwifery in Prevention and Treatment
Wednesday, May 23, 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Virginia Bowen, PhD, MHS
Okeoma Mmeje, MD, MPH
Allison Finkenbinder, MSN, WHNP-BC


CEUs = 1
Rx = 4
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

During 2012–2016, reported cases of congenital syphilis (CS) increased by 88% in the U.S. Nurse Midwives are uniquely poised to help address this preventable adverse health outcome. This session will review the epidemiology of CS, provide clinical information about the diagnosis and treatment of female syphilis and the prevention of CS, and will conclude by highlighting specific actions that nurse midwives can take to prevent CS.

Objectives:
1. Learner will be able to describe the epidemiology of female syphilis and congenital syphilis in the U.S.
2. Learner will be able to describe appropriate syphilis testing and treatment recommendations for females and potentially infected newborns based on CDC guidelines and will be able to apply testing and treatment recommendations in practice.
3. Learner will be able to describe the fundamentals of an appropriate sexual history, the rationale for syphilis testing at time of delivery, and case reporting requirements for cases of female and congenital syphilis.



Think You Know Listeria? Think again.
Wednesday, May 23, 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Katya Simon, CNM, MSN, MS
Mickey Gillmor, CNM, MN
Valentina Simon
Rachel Rosenzweig


CEUs = 1
Rx = 10
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
No description available at time of publication

Wednesday, May 23, 2018 3:30PM - 5:30PM
Clean Pregnancy: Medically supervised withdrawal during pregnancy using a group care and 12-step model
Wednesday, May 23, 3:30PM - 5:30PM
Presented by:
Janelle Komorowski, DNP, CNM

CEUs = 2
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

A recent position statement by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists suggests medically supervised withdrawal of opioid addicted women may be considered during pregnancy.  This presentation demonstrates how a hybrid group prenatal care/12-step care model can help women who refuse or do not have access to treatment with an opioid agonist during pregnancy to withdraw safely and with support.  Recent evidence in the literature in regard to medically supervised withdrawal will be reviewed, and specific protocols will be discussed.

Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to list at least two risks and two benefits of opioid agonist treatment during pregnancy.
2. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to identify eligibility criteria for medically supervised withdrawal.
3. At the end of the session the participant will be able to describe the hybrid group care/12-step care model demonstrated in the session, and identify three benefits of this care model as opposed to traditional care.
4. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to list four steps to creation of a group care/12-step care model similar to that described in this session.
5. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to list five barriers to creation and implementation of a group care/12 step care model as discussed in this session, and at least one way to overcome each barrier.
6. At the end of the session, the participant will be able to identify 3 known and/or theoretical risks of medically supervised withdrawal during pregnancy, and how to decrease potential risks.



Implementation of Group Prenatal Care for Opioid-dependent Pregnant Mothers in the Community Setting
Wednesday, May 23, 3:30PM - 5:30PM
Presented by:
Michelle Drew, DNP, MPH, CNM, FNP-C

CEUs = 0
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The epidemic of opioid use among women of childbearing age in the U.S. has contributed to increase of opioid use among pregnant women. Substance co-use, psychiatric co-morbidities, and relationship issues with intimate partners are commonly observed among pregnant women who are dependent on opioid. Group-based peer support among pregnant women with health risks has been especially acceptable and effective in improving health behaviors and pregnancy outcomes including decreased risks for small for induced labor, gestational age, low birth weight, NICU admission, short intervals between pregnancies, lack of condom use, and unprotected sex. The current report describes implementation of group prenatal care for opioid-dependent pregnant mothers in the community setting. Current obstetrical care for pregnant women who use opioids and other substances in a Mid-Atlantic region is delivered in a fractured manner with limited coordination between obstetrical providers, addiction specialists, mental health providers and other important wrap around services. Group prenatal care was provided at a substance use treatment program, which included individual prenatal care by a midwife, treatment referral should medical issues be identified, interactive educational sessions on prenatal, postnatal, and infant care, and informal communication on patients’ psychosocial wellbeing with a substance use treatment counselor. This initiative is in the process of further integration with community-based peer support initiatives, maternal fetal medicine, and other hospital-based outreach services to increase access to care for this population.
Objectives:
1. Discuss the current incidence and prevalence of opiod use disorders among women of reproductive age in the United States.
2. Describe the challenges of reaching this population with appropriate and comprehensive prenatal care
3. Describe the model of group prenatal care at the Pregnancy Recovery Support Program
4. Describe the characteristics of clients presenting care at the Pregnancy Recovery Support Program
5. Discuss the current outcomes of clients receiving prenatal care through the Pregnancy Recovery Support Program including gestational age at delivery, results of drug screens, birth weight, incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome,, birth weights, and mode of delivery
6. Discuss the Barriers, Successes, Room for improvement and lessons learned from the early pilot and current program.



Opioid Use in Pregnancy: Structuring Care to Improve Outcomes for Mothers and Families
Wednesday, May 23, 3:30PM - 5:30PM
Presented by:
Jan Kriebs, CNM, MSN, FACNM
Michelle Drew, DNP, MPH, CNM, FNP-C
Sister Kay Kramer, CNM, FNP, MSN, DNP
Janelle Komorowski, DNP, CNM
Daisy Goodman


CEUs = 2
Rx = 60
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:

Opioid use during pregnancy continues to rise, driven by the overprescribing of narcotic analgesics as well as high national rates of illicit opioid use. Effective care that incorporates screening for and evidence-based management of opioid use disorders into prenatal and birth care improves outcomes for women and their families.The Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health has released a new patient safety bundle or recommendations to optimize care that can be implemented in any setting. The bundle will be used as a framework for discussion of screening, treatment, and care management within midwifery practice.

Objectives:
1. Discuss the scope and drivers of opioid abuse among women
2. Describe the components of the CPSWH Patient Safety Bundle as a framework for improving clinical care of opioid using women
3. Explain the SBIRT process for screening women for substance use
4. Discuss roles midwives can play in managing the maternity care of women with substance use disorders
5. Identify ways to reduce stigma and stress for women seeking pregnancy care who have a substance use disorder



The Heroin and Opioid Crisis: Lessons for Nurse-Midwives
Wednesday, May 23, 3:30PM - 5:30PM
Presented by:
Sister Kay Kramer, CNM, FNP, MSN, DNP

CEUs = 2
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This presentation will begin with an overview of the heroin and opioid crisis in the US, focusing especially on risks factors of vulnerable women. The unique challenges of the pregnant women with substance use disorder will be discussed in detail. Treatment options and the necessity of community engagement and partnerships will be reviewed, along with national recommendations for the care of this population. Barriers to improving care for this population will be addressed, as well as strategies to minimize barriers. Specific implications for midwifery involvement to improve and enhance the quality of care provided to childbearing women and families will be discussed. Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) will be discussed, particularly focusing on educating women about NAS. Finally, specific approaches to preventing opioid and heroin addictions in childbearing women will be presented.
Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to discuss relevant factors that have led to the heroin/opioid epidemic in the US.
2. Participants will gain knowledge of pregnancy complications associated with opioid use
3. Participants will be able to list optimal screening for opioid use in pregnancy.
4. Participants will be able to list appropriate treatments and medication treatment options.
5. Participants will be able to state the long-term effects of prenatal opioid exposure on children
6. Participants will leave this session with a greater understanding of steps they can take in their home communities to engage in combatting the substantial increase in heroin and opioid use across the US.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018 4:45PM - 5:45PM
Pregnancy-Associated Stroke: Incidence, Outcomes, Identification, and Treatment
Wednesday, May 23, 4:45PM - 5:45PM
Presented by:
Melissa Davis, CNM, FNP, DNP
Bethany Sanders, CNM
Julia Phillippi, PhD, CNM, FACNM
Sharon Holley, DNP, CNM, FACNM


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Education
Session Description:

Stroke is a serious medical issue posing risk of morbidity and mortality in both the pregnant woman and her fetus.  Symptoms of stroke can mimic those of preeclampsia, making the diagnosis difficult.   The majority of strokes occur in the postpartum period but cerebrovascular accidents can happen at any time during pregnancy, birth, and the puerperium.  Due to the increased incidence of stroke among childbearing age women in the United States, the American Heart Association specifically addressed hypertension and stroke during pregnancy in the most recent guidelines and will be reviewed in this presentation.

Objectives:
1. After attending this session, the participants will be able to describe the incidence and pathophysiology of stroke.
2. Participants will be able to explain the different types of stroke.
3. At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to describe risk factors and symptoms for stroke, as well as differential diagnoses.
4. Participants will be able to coordinate the initial care of the woman experiencing a stroke.



Umbilical Cord Management At Birth: Midwifery Practice And Medical Legal Implications
Wednesday, May 23, 4:45PM - 5:45PM
Presented by:
Judith Mercer, PhD, CNM
Debra Erickson-Owens


CEUs = 1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00