ACNM's 59th Annual Meeting & Exhibition
ACNM Program Lisiting
Program Listing
Below is the program schedule for the ACNM's 59th Annual Meeting & Exhibition. You can search for keywords in the session title or filter by track (as defined by authors) using the search options below.
 
Search Options  
Show:
Day:
Track:

Time Slot:
Search:   in  
Display sessions that may qualify for Rx credit:
Display sessions that may interest students:
  
In order to download the handout files for the sessions you need to login with your Registration ID and Last Name. Please click the link below to login now.

Login
Wednesday, May 14, 2014 9:00AM - 10:00AM
Get Plugged In: The Key Essentials Every Midwife Should Know About Social Media Today
Wednesday, May 14, 9:00AM - 10:00AM
Presented by:
Damaris Hay, BA, MPS


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Public Reception
Session Description:
Do you find yourself feeling overwhelmed by the digital atmosphere? Are you unsure of where to start in order to promote yourself and/or your practice over social media channels? This session will provide you with the essential tools you need to feel successful online.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant should be able to demonstrate knowledge and user-comfort with several social platforms, including Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.
2. Participants will leave the session with a strong understanding of how social media and the digital landscape plays a pertinent role in the health care profession today -- and what she/he can do to become an active participant.
3. Participants will be able to identify online tools to help them manage their platforms while increasing efficiency and productivity.
4. At the end of the session, participants should have a better understanding of e-professionalism and its impact on her/his career in midwifery.



Herbs & Pregnancy: Midwifery Considerations
Wednesday, May 14, 9:00AM - 10:00AM
Presented by:
Marie Hastings-Tolsma, CMN, PhD, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Across the globe there is widespread use of herbs during pregnancy and birth though there is variability in both prevalence and the nature of the user. Research suggests that herbal medicines are most often used to complement allopathic pharmacotherapeutics rather than strictly as an alternative. While well over 100 herbs have been reportedly used by pregnant women, including Echinacea, raspberry, ginger, and cannabis, multinational research has demonstrated that women commonly use informal information sources and typically do not discuss with their primary obstetrical provider when deciding for or against use. This presentation describes evidence for use of select commonly ingested herbs, strategies for approaching pregnant women about herb use and documenting that use, perinatal considerations for safety and efficacy, and sources for up-to-date information. Particular emphasis will be on those herbs commonly used in late pregnancy to stimulate cervical remodeling and labor progress. At a time where medical labor induction rates are excessive and few women experience physiologic labor across all stages, the use of herbs may play an important role in the promotion of improved perinatal outcomes.
Objectives:
1. Assess the range and impact of herbs commonly used in pregnancy and birth.
2. Detail strategies for determining evidence for the safety and efficacy of select herbs.
3. Describe the value of detailing the prevalence of herbal use by pregnant women.



Midwifery Wisdom within the Indian Health Service/Tribal Sites
Wednesday, May 14, 9:00AM - 10:00AM
Presented by:
Deborah Crabbe, CNM, MS


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
This session will present an overview of the history of midwifery in the Indian Health Service (IHS) and discuss the unique challenges and barriers for the midwives and the women/families they serve. Samples of diverse cultural strengths, practices, beliefs, and solutions to challenges will be offered in story fashion to describe the rich cultural aspects of midwifery care with this unique American population.
Objectives:
1. Describe the history of traditional and contemporary midwifery roles at IHS/tribal sites and the current collaborative practice models.
2. Identify the multiple factors that influence health disparities, challenges, and barriers to care for AI/AN women
3. Recognize the excellent outcomes provided by midwives at these sites
4. Discuss the role of the IHS/Tribal Affiliate of ACNM and its importance in promoting cohesion and the sharing of resources within the IHS/Tribal sites
5. Discuss approaches midwives use to provide culturally sensitive care relevant to the unique needs of AI/AN women
6. Recognize the strengths of AI/AN women and their families



Phone Triage Simulations: Are Your Students Getting Practice Before Graduation?
Wednesday, May 14, 9:00AM - 10:00AM
Presented by:
Tia Andrighetti, DNP, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
This course will look at the evidence on phone triaging in the education of healthcare professionals. Distance simulations are an ideal modality to deliver this content and enhance the education of midwifery students. One university’s experience with this teaching modality will be explored. Evaluation of student performance and knowledge will be described. Participants will be asked to identify one element in their own program that can be taught using this modality.
Objectives:
1. 1-Identify need for phone triaging simulations in the education of midwifery students.
2. 2-Describe how to implement phone triaging using a standardized patient (SP), SP feedback and SOAP evaluation.
3. 3-Identify one element in their educational program that could be enhanced via phone triaging.



Practical Management of Thyroid Disease in Pregnancy
Wednesday, May 14, 9:00AM - 10:00AM
Presented by:
Lynn Barbour, MD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Currently guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism in pregnancy suffer from a lack of consensus. In this talk, the attendee will learn how to interpret thyroid function tests in pregnancy to avoid common mis-diagnoses, appreciate why there is controversy over the maternal and fetal risks of subclinical hypothyroidism, and gain confidence in the treatment of subclinical and overt hypothyroidism in pregnancy. In addition, the diagnosis and treatment of subclinical hyperthyroidism, gestational thyrotoxicosis, and maternal and fetal Graves will be reviewed.
Objectives:
1. Understand how to interpret thyroid functions in pregnancy
2. Appreciate why there is a lack of consensus about whether to screen for and treat subclinical hypothyroidism in pregnancy
3. Gain confidence in the treatment of subclinical and overt hypothyroidism in pregnancy
4. Understand how to diagnosis subclinical hyperthyroidism and overt hyperthyroidism in pregnancy and distinguish Graves disease from gestational thyrotoxicosis
5. Recognize when and how to treat maternal Graves disease and monitor for evidence of fetal or neonatal Graves disease

Wednesday, May 14, 2014 10:30AM - 11:30AM
Contraception Conundrums
Wednesday, May 14, 10:30AM - 11:30AM
Presented by:
Stephanie Teal, MD, MPH


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
In this case-based presentation, learners will appreciate the interplay of clinical judgment and scientific evidence in choosing the best contraceptive for a variety of patients with common clinical situations that can perplex conscientious providers. We will explore risks for thrombosis, the effects of obesity, and the use of anti-epileptics medications. We will discuss appropriate positions for various types of IUDs, when they must be removed, and how to counsel patients with slight positional deviations.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant should be able to weigh the risks and benefits of various contraceptive options for women with different common medical complications, including obesity, seizure disorder, and extremes of reproductive age.
2. At the end of the session the participant should be able to effectively use the CDC Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Methods.
3. At the end of the session the participant should be able to appropriately diagnose and manage malpositioned IUDs.



Federal Policy Update
Wednesday, May 14, 10:30AM - 11:30AM
Presented by:
Laura Jenson, CNM, MPH, MS, CPH
Jesse Bushman, MA, MALA
Patrick Cooney


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Business
Session Description:
This presentation will inform our members about legislative and regulatory developments since the 2013 ACNM Annual Meeting including health reform and maternal health legislation. Key legislative and regulatory issues pertinent to midwives will be reviewed. The presentation will include a specific focus on current events associated with implementation of the Health Insurance Marketplaces.
Objectives:
1. The participant will be able to discuss specific federal legislation and regulatory efforts to address challenges faced by the midwifery profession.
2. The participant will be able to articulate the successes and shortcomings of Maternal Health Legislation from the 113th Congress, and be apprised of ACNM's plan of action in the 114th Congress.
3. The participant will be able to navigate the ACNM website to find resources for advocating for specific state and federal issues affecting midwifery.
4. The participant will be able to cite and find on the website three key documents they can use to promote midwifery.



Healthy Postpartum Adjustment vs Postpartum Mood and Anxiety Disorders: Understanding the Difference and Tools for Supporting Postpartum Mental Health
Wednesday, May 14, 10:30AM - 11:30AM
Presented by:
Katie Kripke, LCSW


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Postpartum Mood and Anxiety Disorders are known to be the most common complication of childbirth. Too often, women are under and over-diagnosed with postpartum depression and anxiety and the consequences can be disastrous. This talk will address important elements to consider when assessing the mental health of a new mom and will provide concrete tools for both assessment and support so that women thrive in new motherhood.
Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to identify what a "healthy" or "normal" postpartum experience looks and sounds like. Participants will leave with tools for identification, assessment, and support for the mental health of these moms.
2. Participants will be able to identify a "complicated" postpartum adjustment that fits within the category of "postpartum Stress Syndrome". Participants will leave with tools for identification, assessment, and support for the mental health of women in this category.
3. Participant will clearly identify 5 major types of postpartum mood and anxiety disorders including detailed information on postpartum anxiety. Participants will leave with tools for identification, assessment, and support for the mental health of moms in these categories.
4. Participants will leave with a clear understanding of how to educate their families on the "prevention" of postpartum mood and anxiety disorders through the reduction of risk factors.



Obesity in Pregnancy Maternal and Offspring Risks and More Conservative Recommendations for Gestational Weight Gain
Wednesday, May 14, 10:30AM - 11:30AM
Presented by:
Lynn Barbour, MD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Obesity in pregnancy is the leading cause of significant maternal morbidity and the biggest risk factor for childhood obesity. This talk will review both the maternal and fetal short- and long-term risks of obesity in pregnancy and what metabolic contributors may be responsible for excess infant adiposity which can have long term metabolic consequences. In addition, the current Institute of Medicine Gestational Weight Gain Guidelines will be challenged and diet and exercise interventions will be discussed that have potential to limit gestational weight gain and reduce the risk of LGA infants.
Objectives:
1. Understand the risks of obesity on maternal pregnancy outcomes
2. Gain an appreciation of the infant and childhood risks from maternal obesity and the intrauterine metabolic factors that contribute to excess infant adiposity.
3. Recognize why the current IOM guidelines for gestational weight gain are viewed as too liberal for overweight and obese women and that no weight gain is likely safe for obese women.
4. Become familiar with which dietary and physical activity interventions may be most effective to minimize excess weight gain and avoid LGA and the potential risks of a lower carbohydrate/higher fat diet on maternal insulin resistance and infant adiposity.

Wednesday, May 14, 2014 10:30AM - 12:00PM
Integrated Family Planning Panel: Global Health Approaches to Postpartum and Postabortion Family Planning Services
Wednesday, May 14, 10:30AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Phyllis Clark, CNM, MPH
Anna Maria Speciale, CNM
Carolyn Curtis, CNM, MSN, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
In this panel session, you will hear three different presentations on integrated family planning services: 1) "Technology and Teaching Long-Term Family Planning in Ghana" Anna Maria Speciale, 2) "Meeting Global Health Initiative Principles by Providing Postabortion and Postpartum Family Planning" Carolyn Curtis, and 3) "Integrating Family Planning in Postpartum Care through Quality Improvement: Experience from Afghanistan" Phyllis A. Clark

Wednesday, May 14, 2014 12:30PM - 1:30PM
Care and Feeding of the Late Preterm Infant: Overcoming Challenges to Breastfeeding
Wednesday, May 14, 12:30PM - 1:30PM
Presented by:
Kathryn Osborne, CNM, PhD
Janet Engstrom, CNM PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The most recently analyzed data indicate that there are roughly 900 late preterm (34 0/7 through 36 6/7 weeks’ gestation) infants born each day in the United States. In 2011, the late preterm birth rate was 8.28%, accounting for 71% of all preterm births. Although late preterm infants (LPIs) are often similar in size and appearance to their full term counterparts, they are physiologically and metabolically less mature and therefore at greater risk for morbidity and mortality. Specifically, LPIs are at greater risk than term infants for respiratory distress, apnea, temperature instability, hypoglycemia, jaundice, and feeding difficulties. Following discharge from the hospital, late preterm infants are also at increased risk for re-admission because of hyperbilirubinemia, dehydration and feeding difficulties. Breastfed LPIs are readmitted to the hospital for jaundice or feeding problems nearly two times more often than breastfed term infants or non-breastfed LPIs. The benefits of breastfeeding for all infants, and specifically for preterm infants, have been well established. What is less well known is that LPIs face significantly different challenges to successful breastfeeding than term infants, and that treating the LPI as simply a small term infant may lead to re-hospitalization for lactation associated morbidity. The purpose of this presentation is to provide midwives and other maternity care providers with evidence-based breastfeeding support strategies aimed at preventing hospital readmission of late preterm infants.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session participants should be able to: Describe the physiologic developmental differences between late preterm infants and term infants.
2. Identify the impact of physiologic and metabolic prematurity on lactation for late preterm infant-mother dyads.
3. Describe the feeding challenges faced by late preterm mother-infant dyads.
4. Provide breastfeeding support for mothers of late preterm infants that will reduce the risk of hospital readmission for lactation associated morbidity.



Divison of Global Health (DGH) Research Forum I
Wednesday, May 14, 12:30PM - 1:30PM
Presented by:
Amy Levi , CNM, WHNP-BC, FACNM, FAAN


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
Presented in this forum: 1. Abortion care in Ghana: A critical review of the literature (Sarah Rominski, MPH) 2. Factors associated with Adolescent Pregnancy, Psychological Distress and Suicidal Behaviour in Jamaica: An Exploratory Study (Karline Wilson-Mitchell, CNM, RM, RN, MSN) 3. Assessment of the adherence to the Clinical Guide for Humanized Care during Delivery in Chile ( Lorena Binfa, PhD; Jovita Ortiz, MSc)



Estrogen & The Brain
Wednesday, May 14, 12:30PM - 1:30PM
Presented by:
Jan Shepherd, MD, F.A.C.O.G


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Session Description:
The female brain is profoundly influenced by the hormone estrogen. Major hormonal shifts, particularly those that occur postpartum and in the perimenopause, can affect both mood and cognition. This session will explore these effect and the evidence for and against hormone therapy as a means to treat depression, maintain mental acuity, and perhaps reduce the long-term risk of dementia.
Objectives:
1. Identify the physiologic effects of estrogen on the brain.
2. Describe the role of decreased endogenous estrogen and the potential of estrogen therapy in treatment of postpartum and perimenopausal depression.
3. Discuss current evidence regarding the effect of menopausal hormone therapy on development of dementia.



Perinatal Hypertensive Disorders
Wednesday, May 14, 12:30PM - 1:30PM
Presented by:
Kent Heyborne, MD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
ACOG has recently (11/2013) issued an Executive Summary updating clinical recommendations for the care of women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. This presentation will summarize those recommendations and make suggestions for integrating them into practice. The presentation will also provide the best evidence-based recommendations for treatment of postpartum hypertension.
Objectives:
1. The learner will know and be able to integrate the new Executive Summary guidlines into her/his practice.
2. The learner will be able to formulate a treatment plan for a patient presenting with severe precclampsia in pregnancy.
3. The learner will be able to summarize current recommendations for the treatment of postpartum hypertension.



Shared Decision-making in midwifery practice:a shared ethic
Wednesday, May 14, 12:30PM - 1:30PM
Presented by:
Michele Megregian, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Informed consent for pregnancy care and procedures has moved from the extremes of paternalism and consumerism to the middle ground of shared decision-making . Shared decision-making emphasizes the agency of the patient, recognizes the shared duty of patient and provider to explore information and values, and requires a commitment to the decision making process. According to the ACNM statement on normal birth, shared decision-making plays a key role in protecting and promoting normal physiologic birth and woman-centered care. This session will provide an update on the trends in shared decision-making and obstetric and midwifery ethics. The role of shared decision-making in common obstetric interventions, such as GDM screening, Active Management of the Third Stage of Labor, and Fetal Monitoring in Labor will be explored.
Objectives:
1. Describe the history, current trends, and future role of shared decision-making in obstetric and midwifery care in the US
2. Apply modern ethical theories and themes to the patient-midwife relationship and midwifery practice.
3. Describe the implementation of shared decision-making into everyday midwifery practice

Wednesday, May 14, 2014 5:15PM - 6:15PM
Ending the Epidemic: Smoking in the Prenatal/Postpartum Period
Wednesday, May 14, 5:15PM - 6:15PM
Presented by:
Laurie Adams , BS
Pamela McColl, midwife


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
An evidenced-based prenatal and postpartum smoking cessation program that integrates cessation messages into the low socio economic population. Using proven evidence thousands of pregnant women across the U.S. have quit smoking and stay quit. Utilizing the Health and Human Services Clinical Best Practice Guidelines for treating tobacco use midwives will have an evidenced based approach to offer participants to stay tobacco free in the prenatal period, and up to one year postpartum.
Objectives:
1. Participants will be able describe a best-practice approach to helping pregnant women quit smoking and stay quit. Attendees will understand the Clinical Best Practice Guidelines (HHS 2008) 5A's for helping patients quit.
2. Participants will be build skills on how to implement a policy change/system change within their agency whereby every patient is screened for tobacco use and referred to cessation services
3. Participants will learn how to integrate cessation messages into the low socio economic population using motivational interviewing skills.



Promoting normal physiologic birth through partnership with hospital administrators
Wednesday, May 14, 5:15PM - 6:15PM
Presented by:
Diana Jolles, MSN,CNM
Kimberly Cox, PhD, CNM
Margaret Hutchinson , CNM
Mary Jane Lewitt, PhD,CNM
Nicole Wardlaw, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Midwifery Matters - Business
Session Description:
The following panel presentation shares the lessons of the ACNM Normal Birth Task Force, maternity care subcommittee. Created in 2012 under the leadership of Holly Powell Kennedy, the maternity system subcommittee focused over the past year to convince hospital CEOs that normal birth matters. The panel shares the experiences of working with hospital administrators and regional perinatal collaboratives in diverse communities to build partnership. The presentors demonstrate how members can engage hospital leadership to prioritize normal birth.
Objectives:
1. 1. Identify the key stakeholders in the national quality movement and the perinatal care system.
2. 2. Assess the value of nationally endorsed quality measures in the promotion of normal physiologic birth.
3. 3. Assess the value of midwives in the national perinatal quality movement.
4. 4. Explore the differences in receptivity to normal physiologic birth quality assurance and quality improvement projects within 3 diverse communities through the experience of three panelists.
5. 5. Participants will formulate a plan to approach administrators and public health leaders in their community to adopt normal physiologic birth as a public health priority.



Safe to Sleep: Understanding Infant Sleep and Co-Sleeping
Wednesday, May 14, 5:15PM - 6:15PM
Presented by:
Lisa Meltzer, PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Co-sleeping is controversial and confusing, with both sides of the debate strongly arguing for or against this practice. Yet co-sleeping is not black and white. This session will provide midwives and other maternity care providers more information to help understand the different aspects of co-sleeping, as well as how to educate patients on expectations for infant sleep in the first year of life. This session will also review changes to the American Academy of Pediatrics’ recommendations for safe sleeping, and describe the literature on both the benefits of proximity sleeping and the dangers of bed-sharing. Finally, recommendations for how to help newborns become good sleepers will be provided.
Objectives:
1. Describe normal infant sleep and what to expect as a new parent
2. Identify the different types of co-sleeping
3. Understand the changes to the AAP recommendations for safe sleeping
4. Critique the literature on the pros and cons of co-sleeping
5. Describe basic interventions to encourage safe sleeping



The Midwifery Mini Business Institute: An Innovative Teaching Strategy for Midwifery Education
Wednesday, May 14, 5:15PM - 6:15PM
Presented by:
Connie Dewees, DrPH, MN, CNM
Elizabeth Jesse, PhD, CNM
Bill McDowell, PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
As stated in the Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice, professional responsibilities include knowledge of practice management and finances; however, student midwives often lack the confidence, skills, and knowledge to market their skills and accomplishments as they seek practice positions in the healthcare market. Student midwives need information and skills to develop a midwifery practice that is productive, financially sound, and structured to meet the many business challenges within healthcare today. This presentation will describe an innovative educational model, the Midwifery Mini Business Institute (MMBI) which was guided by the theory of self-efficacy. The MMBI was used to teach this information and to enhance students’ confidence in marketing themselves as midwives, in creating practices, and in becoming actively involved in professional activities. Midwifery faculty in a distance education program take advantage of an on-campus orientation to present the MMBI. Guest experts who share their experiences and expertise with students include faculty from the College of Business, midwives in a variety of practice models, a birth center business manager, a university career center counselor, and a state midwifery leader. National and regional experts present using online technology. Subsequent assignments that reinforce and build upon these presentations include developing a professional portfolio and a business plan for a midwifery practice.
Objectives:
1. 1.Identify knowledge and skills related to career and practice development needed by beginning midwives
2. 2.Recognize innovative methods of presenting the business aspects of various midwifery practice models
3. 3.Describe resources for students to develop skill in resume writing and interviewing for positions
4. 4.Identify business resources for developing midwifery practices



The Nominating Committee Is Calling All Names…We Want You!
Wednesday, May 14, 5:15PM - 6:15PM
Presented by:
Kathleen Brown, CNM
Michael McCann, CNM
Pamela Reis, PhD, CNM, NNP-BC
Maria Valentin-Welsh, CNM, MPH, FACNM
Julia Lange Kessler, CM, DNP, FACNM
Amy Romano, MSN, CNM
Angelita Nixon, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
This session will describe the different leadership positions available through the American College of Nurse Midwives. The nature of each office and the time commitment needed. The nominating committee & the transparency of the committee. Discussion will include how pursuing a leadership position at the college can help to further your current career and help further the profession of midwifery at the same time.
Objectives:
1. The learner will be able to explain the nature of each office and the time commitment needed.
2. The learner will recognize the nominating committee & the transparency of the committee.
3. The learner will be able to list what makes a good national candidate
4. The Learner will encourage leaders to step forward and understand how they shape our profession.
5. The learner will submit a nomination or volunteer for an ACNM leadership position.

Thursday, May 15, 2014 8:00AM - 9:00AM
Delivering Change: Healthy Moms, Healthy Babies
Thursday, May 15, 8:00AM - 9:00AM
Presented by:
Terrah Stroda , CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
This presentation will provide information on how the midwifery model of care can provide a catalyst for affecting positive change in the medical and public health settings within your community. This is the story of how one rural Midwest community reversed infant mortality and improved overall women's health care dramatically by inspiring, collaborating, and "midwifing".
Objectives:
1. The participant will be able to identify what resources are available in their region to locate community-specific risk factors for maternal and infant health.
2. The participant shall be able to identify three risk factors relating to maternal health in their community.
3. The participant shall be able to identify three risk factors relating to infant health in their community.
4. The participant will produce a short action plan, that involves a multidisciplinary community team, that will seek to improve the maternal and infant risks identified above
5. The participant will utilize the midwifery model of care to provide inspiration and research-based knowledge gain to encourage the proposed community action plan.



Divison of Research (DOR) Research Forum I
Thursday, May 15, 8:00AM - 9:00AM
Presented by:
Carrie Klima, CNM PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
Presented in this forum: 1. Outcomes of Nulliparous Women with Spontaneous Labor Onset Admitted to Hospitals in Pre-active versus Active Labor ( Jeremy L. Neal, CNM, PhD; Nancy K. Lowe, CNM, PhD; Sharon L. Ryan, CNM, DNP) 2. PRONTO: Obstetric and Neonatal Emergency Simulation in Mexico improves patient outcomes, provider knowledge, team coordination, and identifies latent systems errors (Susanna R. Cohen, MSN, CNM; Jenifer Fahey, MPH, CNM; Dilys M. Walker, MD) 3. Acupuncture for the Treatment of Vulvodynia ( Judith M. Schlaeger, CNM, LAc, PhD)



Moving Evidence into Practice: Making Intermittent Auscultation the Norm in the Hospital Setting
Thursday, May 15, 8:00AM - 9:00AM
Presented by:
Cathy Emeis, PhD, CNM
Sally Hersh, DNP, CNM
Michele Megregian, MS, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Continuous fetal monitoring is one of the most common intraparum interventions for low risk laboring women in North America despite the lack of evidence showing improvement in neonatal outcomes with this intervention. There is mounting evidence that continuous fetal monitoring in low risk women may increase the cesarean delivery rate. We will examine the current evidence regarding electronic fetal monitoring, and present the evidence for intermittent auscultation as more than just a safe and reasonable option for fetal surveillance for low risk women in labor. Common barriers found when using intermittent auscultation for low risk women in the hospital setting will be addressed. The use of shared decision making when discussing fetal surveillance in labor will also be examined.
Objectives:
1. Describe the historical context that contributed to the establishment of continuous fetal monitoring as the norm for fetal surveillance in hospitals in the United States.
2. Compare and contrast the potential harms and benefits of continuous fetal monitoring with intermittent auscultation for low risk laboring women.
3. Compare and contrast the potential harms and benefits of continuous fetal monitoring with intermittent auscultation for neonates.
4. Explore the considerations for introducing an intermittent auscultation protocol in a hospital setting.
5. Review the role of SDM in midwifery care and the implementation of SDM into everyday midwifery practice
6. Explore the role of a shared decision-making framework and informed consent with fetal monitoring.



Promoting recruitment and retention to increase diversity in nurse-midwifery and nurse practitioner education- The PRIDE Program at Frontier Nursing
Thursday, May 15, 8:00AM - 9:00AM
Presented by:
Susan Stone, DNSc, CNM, FAAN, FACNM
Stephanie Boyd


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
Lack of diversity among healthcare professionals is considered one of the key factors contributing to existing healthcare disparities in the U.S. While research has continuously supported the idea of increasing racial and ethnic minority representation in the fields of nursing and midwifery in order to promote more culturally competent care, there has not been a significant increase in the number of minorities working within nurse-midwifery. According to a 2009-2011 membership survey by the American College of Nurse-Midwives, less than 7% of members of the American College of Nurse-Midwives identify as a racial or ethnic midwife. To meet the needs of an increasingly diverse population, Frontier Nursing University established the Pride Program with the goal of recruiting and retaining qualified underrepresented students in the graduate school of nursing. Through its ground breaking efforts, Frontier Nursing University has successfully increased overall minority student enrollment, increased the number of minority nurse-midwifery students enrolled, and retained those students leading to an increase in the number of minority graduates. Participants attending this session will be able to identify barriers to pursuing nurse-midwifery education for minority nurses. Participants attending this session will learn innovative recruitment strategies that have resulted in increased minority student nurse-midwifery enrollment. Participants will also be able to describe strategies that have been found to improve retention of minority nurse-midwifery students.
Objectives:
1. Participants attending this session will be able to identify barriers to pursuing nurse-midwifery education for minority nurses.
2. Participants attending this session will learn innovative recruitment strategies that have resulted in increased minority student nurse-midwifery enrollment.
3. Participants will also be able to describe strategies that have been found to improve retention of minority nurse-midwifery students.



Starting conversations as part of improving quality of birth care: Lessons learned from India and Guatemala
Thursday, May 15, 8:00AM - 9:00AM
Presented by:
Amy Nacht, CNM


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
Bringing about meaningful and sustained quality improvement requires sustained engagement of community and leadership. Our speakers will present their experience in implementation -starting with understanding and engagement of the community, leadership, and birth attendants. They will discuss barriers, resistance, and creative approaches to address these.
Objectives:
1. Describe the process of baseline community assessment, literature search, interviews of targeted recipients (traditional birth attendant and health workers), and key stakeholders/informants to assess educational needs for health workers in the Trifinio region of Guatemala.
2. Describe the planning process and methods of ongoing evaluation both qualitative and quantitative using the baseline assessment to design site specific educational and clinical intervention in maternal health specific to the traditional birth attendant.
3. List three types of barriers encountered in the BetterBirth Trial from Indian Health Care systems, and a creative approach to overcoming resistance.
4. Give an example of a systems-issue that can affect implementation of quality measures and three important elements of a health care system which need to be engaged for implementation success.
5. Describe two characteristics of a successful quality improvement implementation team.

Thursday, May 15, 2014 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Big Dreams, Bold Approaches: Strengthening Clinical Goverance to Improve Emergency Obstetric Care in Indonesia
Thursday, May 15, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Anne Hyre, CNM, MSN, MPH


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
Despite sufficient human resources, supplies, funds, and infrastructure, Indonesia has a maternal mortality ratio of 359 per 100,000 live births—higher than nearly every other country and South and Southeast Asia. The majority of deaths are occurring in hospitals. This session will describe a unique partnership and new approaches to improve clinical governance and increase accountability in large referral hospitals.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant should be able to demonstrate the following knowledge and/or skills: Describe key elements of clinical governance, and how it contributes to overall quality of care
2. Describe the underlying causes of poor quality services and high case fatality rates in Indonesian hospitals.
3. Become familiar with quality improvement approaches that could be replicated by midwives working in developing countries.



Management of IUGR: An Update
Thursday, May 15, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Henry Galan, MD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a common problem in pregnancy affecting up to 10% of all pregnancies depending on the definition used. IUGR increases morbidity and mortality for the fetus and newborn, as well as for the adult that the fetus is destined to become including diabetes, coronary artery disease and cardiac related death. It also places the mother at risk for cesarean section and potential sequelae due to the associated high rates of fetal heart rate abnormalities, especially in severe IUGR. While there is no treatment for IUGR, the most effective way to reduce the risk of IUGR is to first identify at risk pregnancies and to initiate a baby ASA for at risk pregnancies prior to 16 weeks. The recurrence rate of IUGR in subsequent pregnancies is approximately 20%. Management of IUGR is dependent on etiology. The most common cause of pathologic IUGR is placental insufficiency and management is largely related to curtailment of high levels of physical activity, discontinuation of habits (smoking, alcohol, etc), and hydration. Modified bed rest may be recommended if growth restriction is severe. Surveillance of IUGR includes the use of serial ultrasounds for assessment of growth, Doppler velocimetry of the umbilical artery, and antepartum testing. Only delivery of IUGR will arrest the placental disease process and timing delivery of IUGR is a challenge as one has to weigh the risks of prematurity with that of continued intrauterine life and risk of end-organ injury in utero. Uncomplicated IUGR pregnancies can be delivered between 38-39 weeks. Those with additional maternal complicating factors (e.g. preeclampsia) should be delivered by 37 weeks. Depending on severity of maternal co-existing disease or severity of IUGR, earlier delivery may be recommended and prior to 34 weeks, betamethasone should be administered for fetal benefit.
Objectives:
1. Following this lecture, the learner will be able to: Discuss terminology and background rates of IUGR
2. Following this lecture, the learner will be able to: Discuss the short & long-term morbidities of IUGR.
3. Following this lecture, the learner will be able to: Understand how to diagnose IUGR.
4. Following this lecture, the learner will be able to: Discuss normal and abnormal Doppler waveforms in the middle cerebral and umbilical arteries. • Understand the basic physics of Doppler velocimetry • Discuss how to use Doppler in the management of IUGR
5. Following this lecture, the learner will be able to: Discuss how to use Doppler in the management of IUGR and the timing of delivery of the IUGR fetus.
6. Following this lecture, the learner will be able to: Discuss the timing of delivery of the IUGR fetus.



The National Quality Movement and Midwifery: Get on the bus or be left behind
Thursday, May 15, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Diana Jolles, MSN,CNM
Cathy Emeis, PhD, CNM
Mary Barger, PhD, MPH, CNM, FACNM
Jesse Bushman, MA, MALA
Carrie Klima, CNM PhD
Amy Romano, CNM MSN
Brenda Quatrochi, CNM MSN
Eliza Burelle, CNM MSN


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Midwifery Matters - Public Perception, Midwifery Matters - Business
Session Description:
The following presentation is for students, practicing midwives, service directors, and administrators. The interactive presentation helps ACNM members link the midwifery movement to the larger national quality framework. It serves as a primer for midwives new to the national quality movement as well as an update for those currently working within the larger framework. Members will learn from volunteers currently serving the profession through work with the Joint Commission, the National Quality Forum, and a variety of perinatal safety initiatives.
Objectives:
1. 1. Participants will restate the National Quality Forum (NQF) endorsed perinatal measures required Joint Commission beginning in January 2014.
2. 2. Participants will examine opportunities for midwifery leadership within in the national quality movement and within quality assurance and quality improvement programs.
3. 3. Participants will formulate an individualized quality assurance and quality improvement strategy using the ACNM Standard Setting Documents and the National Quality Forum Endorsed Measures relating to normal physiologic birth.



Treating Menopausal Symptoms Naturally
Thursday, May 15, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Cynthia Anderson, CNM, ND


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
There exists multiple natural options for women to sail into the climacteric period of their life. From Ashwaganda to Zingiber these safe herbs and homeopathics have withstood the test of time and many stand up to scientific scrutiny. Learn the secrets of these gentle giants to help the women you care for with everything from hot flashes to memory loss.
Objectives:
1. The attendee will be able to choose and appropriately prescribe the top herbal, nutrient and homeopathic remedies to help women safely and naturally with hot flashes.
2. The attendee will be able to show the scientific proof to her clients of the natural remedies she/he is utilizing for specific conditions.
3. The attendee will be able to describe the importance of the adrenals during the perimenopausal/menopausal period of a women's life. The attendee will be able to appropriately order, and understand the adrenal testing. Based on the test results the attendee will be able to appropriately prescribe herbal, and nutrient options to balance the adrenal function.
4. The attendee will be able to appropriately choose herbal and homeopathic remedies to assist a women with issues related to libido and atrophic vaginitis.
5. The attendee will be able to order specific bone marker testing and prescribe nutrient, herbal, lifestyle and homeopathic remedies that assist with preventing bone loss and promoting increasing bone density during the menopausal period of a woman's life.
6. The attendee will be able to prescribe nutrients, lifestyle and herbal remedies that assist with preventing memory loss during the menopausal period.



US-MERA Project Envisioning the Future of Midwifery in the US
Thursday, May 15, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Cathy Collins-Fulea, MSN, CNM, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous, Midwifery Matters - Business
Session Description:
This presentation will describe the US-MERA project that has brought together the 7 organizations that oversee education, regulation and associations of CNMs, CMs and CPMs in America. The process of bringing these 7 organizations together for a facilitated meeting will be discussed as well as the outcome of that meeting and future directions of the project. The 7 members of the US-MERA steering group will participation in a discussion of next steps for the future and to answer questions.
Objectives:
1. Attendees will identify the organizations involved and the goals for the US MERA meeting in April, 2013.
2. Attendees will be able to define the ICM global standards and ways in which the U.S. midwifery profession may align with the three midwifery pillars of Education, Regulation, and Associations (ERA).
3. Attendees will develop an understanding of the CPM credential.

Thursday, May 15, 2014 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Development and Testing of a Capstone OSCE to Evaluate Safe, Beginning Midwifery Practice Competence
Thursday, May 15, 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Presented by:
Melissa Saftner, PhD, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
External requirements to demonstrate clinical competence in health care practice are increasing. In this presentation we will describe the development and initial beta testing of an objective structured clinical examinaation (OSCE) to evaluate midwifery competence prior to completion of a graduate midwifery education program. The process of development of the examination template using ACNM Core Competencies and evaluation of the beta testing of this OSCE will be discussed.
Objectives:
1. Describe the use of OSCE in midwifery education.
2. Analyze a process for development of a capstone OSCE based on ACNM core Competencies and other national competencies.
3. Describe parameters for implementing a capstone OSCE for summative evaluation of midwifery competence.



Night Sweats, Mood Swings, Nocturia and Memory Issues: Maybe It's Not Perimenopause...Maybe She Needs a Sleep Study
Thursday, May 15, 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Presented by:
Janet Beardsley, MSN, CNM, ANP-C


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Sleep disturbances are a common complaint in women's health care and can have a number of causes. However, many symptoms which bring women to the midwife's office for possible perimenopausal or urogynecologic complaints can indicate other types of sleep disorders. For example, common symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea are: night sweats, poor sleep quality, moodiness, irritability, poor memory and concentration, frequent urination at night, fatigue, depression and anxiety. Sounds familiar? Although obesity is associated with obstructive sleep apnea, thin individuals can have severe sleep apnea, too. Sleep disorders such as untreated obstructive sleep apnea and sleep deprivation have a clear association with significant morbidity and mortality. However, midwives and primary care providers are often not taught to assess and screen for sleep disorders in their daily practice. This session will review some common sleep disorders and discuss their physiology and clinical signs. Screening methods for use in well woman and problem visits will be discussed and we will look at treatment options and when to refer to a sleep specialist.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, the participant should understand the physiology of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and sleep apnea (SA).
2. Participants will be able to discuss the long term health consequences of obstructive sleep apnea and sleep deprivation.
3. Participant will gain familiarity with screening tools for SDB, OSA for use in their clinical settings.
4. Participants will identify clinical findings which warrant referral to sleep medicine specialists for further evaluation.
5. Participants will have a better understanding of the treatment options for common sleep disorders such as OSA, SDB, sleep deprivation and insomnia.



Our Window of Opportunity: Advanced Political Action and Activism for Midwives
Thursday, May 15, 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Presented by:
Kathryn Osborne, CNM, PhD
Cara Kinzelman, PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
Despite the exceptional outcomes of midwifery care that have been described in published literature, fewer than 10% of American women seek midwifery care during pregnancy. One of the reasons for this is limited access to midwifery care, nation-wide, that is largely due to outdated regulatory barriers to midwifery practice. As the Affordable Care Act is implemented and millions of previously uninsured Americans gain access to affordable health insurance, the existing shortage of primary care providers will be exacerbated. Similarly, shortages in the maternity care workforce are predicted for the near future. Increased utilization of certified nurse-midwives (CNMs), certified midwives (CMs), and all advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) has been suggested as one solution to health care workforce shortages. Recognition of the important role midwives will play in resolving workforce shortages provides CNMs and CMs with a window of opportunity to improve the regulatory framework for midwives, remove barriers to practice, and increase access to midwifery care. The evidence in support of improving the practice environment for midwives is mounting. In their 2010 report on the future of nursing, the Institute of Medicine recommended the removal of outdated regulatory barriers to practice for all APRNs; a systematic review of APRN outcomes found optimal outcomes and cost savings associated with nurse-midwifery care; and a 2009 Cochrane Review concluded most women should be offered and encouraged to ask for midwife-led models of care. Since midwifery practice is regulated at the state level it is incumbent upon CNMs/CMs to take advantage of this window of opportunity and actively engage in the process of improving the regulatory environment for midwives in their individual states. The purpose of this session is to provide tools to advance a legislative agenda for midwives who have a basic level of comfort with the legislative process.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session participants should be able to: Describe the capacity of midwives to reduce the shortage of health care providers.
2. Access and understand the statutes and administrative rules that regulate midwifery practice in their own state.
3. Establish a legislative agenda for their state affiliate of ACNM.
4. Work with their ACNM affiliate and other organizations to advance a legislative agenda.



Professional Preservation through Analysis of Variation within the ACNM Benchmarking Project
Thursday, May 15, 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Presented by:
Diana Jolles, MSN,CNM
Brenda Quatrochi, CNM MSN
Eliza Burelle, CNM MSN
Jessica Schwarz, CNM MSN
Janice Lankford, CNM
Heather Murphy, CNM MSN


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Midwifery Matters - Business
Session Description:
The following presentation is geared towards students, practicing midwives, services directors and administrators. The interactive presentation reviews the results of the most recent ACNM Benchmarking project and demonstrates how data is used to preserve, protect and promote midwifery through quality assurance and quality improvement.
Objectives:
1. 1. Participants will identify the role of benchmarking in quality assurance and quality improvement.
2. 2. Participants will differentiate research, quality assurance and quality improvement.
3. 3. Participants will examine the results of the 2012 ACNM Benchmarking program.
4. 4. Participants will categorize variations in midwifery practice within the 2012 ACNM.
5. 5. Benchmarking Dataset according to Wennberg’s framework of “unwarranted variations in care”.
6. 6. Participants will apply appreciative techniques to leverage midwifery-led positive deviance and decrease unwarranted variation



Skin Care Across the Lifespan
Thursday, May 15, 3:45PM - 4:45PM
Presented by:
Peggy Vernon , RN,MA,C-PNP,DCNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Understanding the structure and function of the skin as well as mechanism of action of skin care products will enable the provider to educate patients about maintenance of healthy skin and the prevention of skin cancer.
Objectives:
1. At the completion of this presentation, the participants will be able to: Identify two structures in the skin.
2. Describe Fitzpatrick Skin Type II.
3. List two active ingredients in sunscreen.
4. Describe one characteristic of basal cell carcinoma.

Thursday, May 15, 2014 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Adolescent Health Care: Are We Meeting Their Needs?
Thursday, May 15, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Kate Fouquier, PhD, RN, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
Among all industrialized nations, the United States continues to have the highest adolescent birth rate and has one of the highest rates of sexually transmitted infections (STI). Despite our nearly two decade decline in adolescent pregnancy and birth rates, the overall picture of adolescent reproductive health, particularly STIs, is worrisome. Adolescents face serious challenges in seeking and receiving comprehensive primary and preventative health. Social, cultural and economic factors are substantial obstacles faced by adolescents, particularly in receiving sexual and reproductive health services. Establishing adolescent friendly services that provide comprehensive, culturally competent sexual and reproductive health can address the barriers that adolescents face and can be a first step in removing obstacles that prevent health equity among this population.
Objectives:
1. 1. Define Twenty-first Century adolescent’s beliefs regarding sexual and reproductive health.
2. 2. Recognize obstacles faced by adolescents obtaining health care, particularly youth of color, GLBTQ, and males.
3. 3. Articulate adolescent friendly health care services and how to incorporate these concepts into practice.



Postpartum Breast Cancer
Thursday, May 15, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Virginia Borges, MD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Women diagnosed with breast cancer age < 45 represent 27,000 of all US breast cancer diagnosed annually. Young women diagnosed within 5 years of their last childbirth are nearly 3 times more likely to die from their disease as compared to young breast cancer patients who have never been pregnant. This increased risk for breast cancer death is independent of typical clinical prognostic issues, such as stage, subtype of breast cancer or type of treatment. That is, something specific to the window of time after pregnancy accounts for the observed increased risk for metastasis and death in these young patients.
Objectives:
1. The participants will be able to identify risk factors associated with the young onset of breast cancer.
2. The participants will be able to identify the interactions with pregnancy as a contributor to young onset breast cancer.
3. The participants will be able to identify factors affecting young women treated for early onset breast cancer.
4. The participants will be able to identify factors affecting the safety of childbearing after successful treatment of cancer.
5. The participants will be able to identify advances in research occurring for this unique subset of breast cancer.



Secure Communication in the Electronic Age: Protect Your Practice and Your Clients, Understanding HIPPA regulations
Thursday, May 15, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Karen King, CNM, MSm


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Business
Session Description:
Midwives need to better understand how to communicate in a secure HIPPA complaint manor. This includes telephone communication, email, and texting. This session will discuss how to use the proper tools to communicate with Clients as well as colleagues. Websites, Facebook, blogging all can be pitfalls to HIPPA compliant communication learn how to keep confidentiality while working in a midwifery environment.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session participants will better understand what constitutes secure and non secure communication.
2. At the end of the session the participant will have a better understand of HIPPA regulations in regards to communication.
3. At the end of the session participants will have a better understanding of how to set up a secure communication tools.



Utilizing the Menstrual Cycle as a Vital Sign
Thursday, May 15, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Colleen Flowers , BA, HRHP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
“Is her period normal?” Find out how the answer to this question may aid you in determining a woman's overall health. By recognizing the 4 parameters of normal menses and the menstrual cycle with respect to age and reproductive life stage, you can determine the possible underlying cause (such as hormonal imbalances, disease, psychological conditions, drug use, etc.) from reported menstrual abnormalities. In addition, when she charts her cycle, you may gain invaluable insight into her reproductive and general health that would not otherwise be reported from her recall of medical and menstrual cycle history.
Objectives:
1. Understand the value of the 4 parameters of menstrual cycle health.
2. Evaluate a woman's overall health (with respect to age and reproductive life-stage) by including her current and past menstrual cycle history.
3. Identify potential causes of menstrual cycle abnormality so as to address the underlying dysfunction.
4. Describe how cycle charting and body literacy can benefit the woman and health care provider with an accurate reporting of the specific areas of menstrual cycle health.



You are What Your Mother Ate
Thursday, May 15, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Mary Barger, PhD, MPH, CNM, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
It is now clearer than ever that what women eat in pregnancy can alter gene expression in the baby through epigenetics. Epigenetic changes from the mother’s and even grandmother’s lifestyles can affect the baby’s body and brain from infancy through old age. This presentation will review how the maternal intrauterine environment affects gene expression, discuss the latest evidence related to nutrition and perinatal outcomes and provide practical strategies for the busy midwife to incorporate nutrition advice into their practice.
Objectives:
1. Describe the evidence for how the intrauterine environment affects gene expression.
2. Describe how macronutrients affect physiologic functioning and perinatal outcomes.
3. Discuss the importance of micronutrients and vitamins in healthy pregnancy outcomes.
4. Provide simple strategies to start a nutrition dialogue with women.
5. Describe easy to use tools to help in nutrition assessment and counseling.

Friday, May 16, 2014 10:00AM - 11:00AM
Caring for the Obese Woman in Labor
Friday, May 16, 10:00AM - 11:00AM
Presented by:
Nicole Carlson, CNM, MS


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Nearly 2/3 of women of childbearing age in the United States are currently either overweight or obese. These women are more likely to have labor difficulties resulting in unplanned cesarean delivery, with increased risk for morbidity and mortality when compared to normal weight women. This session will review current evidence on the unique labor physiology of women with increased BMI. The session will compare labor progress, the use of labor interventions, and labor outcomes in women of different BMIs. Evidence-based recommendations for the optimal care of women with high BMI during pregnancy and labor will be provided.
Objectives:
1. I. Review scope of the obesity epidemic in the United States (5 min)
2. II. At end of session, participants will better understand the incidence and sequelae of unplanned cesarean among obese and overweight women. (5 min)
3. III. At end of this session, participants will understand the influence of increased BMI on patterns of labor progress. (15 min)
4. IV. This session will assist participants to better understand the differential use and effectiveness of common intrapartum interventions in overweight and obese women.(10 min)
5. V. By the end of this session, participants will demonstrate knowledge of current research findings on the effectiveness and dosages for synthetic oxytocin and prostaglandins when used with obese women. (5 min)
6. VI. This session will allow participants a better understanding of evidence-based recommendations for antepartum care of obese women. (10 min)



Nulliparous women, labor dystocia, and partographs: Improving birth safety and outcomes in U.S. hospitals
Friday, May 16, 10:00AM - 11:00AM
Presented by:
Nancy Lowe, PhD, CNM, FACNM, FAAN


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
In U.S. hospitals, the diagnosis of dystocia during labor is responsible for approximately half of all cesarean deliveries experienced by nulliparous women carrying a term, singleton, cephalic fetus. Research data suggest that unrealistic and poorly defined expectations of labor progress in nulliparous women commonly contribute to over-diagnoses of dystocia and decisions to intervene with cesarean delivery. We propose that use of a new physiologic partograph for assessing the progress of labor in nulliparous women in U.S. hospitals will safely limit the diagnosis of dystocia to only the slowest 10%, and will decrease oxytocin augmentation and cesarean delivery rates for dystocia by at least 50%. In this session, we will review the epidemiology of labor dystocia in the U.S., the unique features of labor in nulliparous women that make them particularly prone to diagnoses of dystocia, historical criteria for the diagnosis of dystocia, and the relationships among the evaluation of labor progress through a contemporary partograph, clinical decision-making, and the diagnosis of dystocia during first labor.
Objectives:
1. Describe the significant influence of diagnoses of dystocia on the rate of cesarean delivery for nulliparous women who receive care in U.S. hospitals
2. List parameters of clinical diagnoses of dystocia in nulliparous women.
3. Discuss the relationships among observation of labor progress and clinical decisionmaking during labors of nulliparous women.
4. Describe the use and interpretation of a physiologic partograph during labors of nulliparous women who receive care in U.S. hospitals.



Ongoing Professional Practice Evaluation (OPPE) and Focused Professional Practice Evaluation (FPPE): incorporating The Joint Commission credentialing requirements into midwifery practice
Friday, May 16, 10:00AM - 11:00AM
Presented by:
Sharon Holley, CNM, DNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Session Description:
All hospitals and facilities accredited by The Joint Commission have been required since 2008 to adopt measures that evaluate the clinical performance, competence and professional behavior for all credentialed health care providers within their facility. This is a requirement for both credentialing and privileging within the facility for each cycle. Many providers remain unaware or unclear about what the Ongoing Professional Practice Evaluation (OPPE) and the Focused Professional Practice Evaluation (FPPE) are or what it entails. Describing the process, differentiating the two types of evaluations, and reviewing the challenges each evaluation type presents are included within this talk. More specifically, how this relates to midwifery practice and the challenges faced by the OPPE/FPPE are also discussed.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session participants will be able to list at least 3 ways the OPPE and FPPE are used for credentialing and privileging.
2. At the end of the session participants will be able to distinguish between the uses of the FPPE for a new hire versus a new skill as compared to one for performance problems
3. At the end of the session participants will select at least 2 items they can utilize in their own practice setting to help improve or start the OPPE ongoing cycle of evaluation.
4. At the end of the session participants will be able to identify at least 3 ways this can be uniquely tailored to their own midwifery practice
5. At the end of this session participants will be able to identify at least 2 challenges that are faced with creating an OPPE.

Friday, May 16, 2014 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Ending Preventable Maternal and Newborn Mortality: Respectful Care as an Essential Global Strategy
Friday, May 16, 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Presented by:
Mary Ellen Stanton, CNM MSN FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
Disrespect and abuse of women during childbirth is widespread through the world and has been documented in many countries by Hill and Bowser in a 2010 landscape review. The review became the basis for a study funded by USAID conducted in Kenya and Tanzania and supported by work done by the White Ribbon Alliance. The study is now drawing to a close and preliminary results and analysis will be discussed during the panel. In addition, the study’s results and the growing interest in highlighting the topic in MNCH programs world-wide and incorporating program approaches will be presented during the panel. In this way, participants can gain insight into approaches that can be adapted to countries, both developed and developing, to promote respectful care for all women giving birth, thus building on the 2011 Universal Rights of the Childbearing Women.
Objectives:
1. Describe the types and prevalence of disrespect and abuse found in childbirth in selected health facilities in Kenya and Tanzania.
2. Discuss various approaches underway to promote respectful care of childbearing women in African settings.
3. Review initial findings and analysis of interventions which have been implemented to promote respectful care.
4. Understand that respectful care is a cross-cutting issue which has implications for program development in maternal and newborn health.
5. Discuss how findings and approaches can be adapted to other settings throughout the world.

Friday, May 16, 2014 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Boots on the Ground: Mobilizing Midwives to Remove Barriers to Practice
Friday, May 16, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Denise Smith, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
The midwifery scope of practice is defined as the “independent provision of primary care, gynecologic and family planning services, preconception care, care during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period, care of the normal newborn during the first 28 days of life,” yet the midwifery scope of practice varies from state-to-state depending on each states’ licensure and scope of practice statutes. While some states recognize CNMs as independent practitioners, other states are more restrictive and require formal collaborative agreements or even physician sponsorship as a pre-requisite to licensure. Removing these barriers to practice will be necessary if midwives are to be utilized to their potential. The purpose of this session is to equip midwives with resources to assist them in breaking through barriers to practice in their own hospitals, health systems or state governments.
Objectives:
1. Describe barriers to midwifery practice
2. Identify policy and advocacy organizations working on the barriers to practice issue
3. Locate web-based resources; research, data, white papers related to barriers to practice
4. Describe the 8 step process for leading change
5. Download and adapt a sample power point for use in presentation for grand rounds, or to health system executives or policy makers
6. Discuss the current political events surrounding scope of practice expansion



Marijuana in Pregnancy
Friday, May 16, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Laura Borgelt , PharmD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Twenty U.S. states and the District of Columbia have laws that allow marijuana to be used for medicinal reasons; two of those states have also passed laws for recreational use. Pregnant women may resort to using marijuana to alleviate nausea and vomiting, for other medical conditions, or recreationally. It is important for providers to understand the characteristics of marijuana for a woman and her fetus, including therapeutic effects, potential side effects, drug interactions, various dosage forms, and patient safety issues. Providers need to know how to communicate with patients about the effects of using marijuana in pregnancy.
Objectives:
1. Review various dosage forms of marijuana and the pharmacodynamic impact for each type of product.
2. Describe the therapeutic effects and potential drug interactions of marijuana
3. Evaluate potential risks to the mother and fetus when using marijuana during pregnancy
4. Identify adverse effects of marijuana and consumer safety issues that should be addressed when marijuana is used



Midwifery Education Roundtable
Friday, May 16, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Dawn Durain , CNM, MPH, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
Presentation I – Clinical Learning Teams The BirthCare Health Care faculty practice at University of Utah has adopted an innovative midwifery student precepting model - “Clinical Learning Teams.” Through the use of student-to-student mentoring, collaborative learning and structured clinical rotations, this new precepting model has moved the education format from the one-student-one-preceptor model to a significantly more flexible cooperative model in which 2-3 students are in a clinical setting together at the same time. The model has maintained personalized patient care, increased student learning, and improved preceptor satisfaction. The presentation will describe the mechanisms for implementation, how to obtain preceptor and student buy-in, and helpful suggestions for adoption. Presentation II – iPad Technology in the Classroom and Clinical Setting The application of knowledge, rather than straight didactic content, is a hallmark of MSN and DNP programs and necessitates the use of technologies that allow students to think outside of traditional educational models. The use of the iPad in educational programs allows the faculty to engage students in application level activities in and out of the classroom while still conveying essential information through the use of iBooks and iTunesU. This type of engagement and active learning will hopefully allow students to focus in on the real problems facing healthcare and empower them to be the change agents of the future. This presentation will describe the capabilities of various iPad function and applications as applicable to midwifery education. Presentation III – Team Based Learning Team-Based Learning (TBL) is collaborative learning system for classroom learning based on individual work, group work and immediate feedback. As a result of Team Based Learning students are directly accountable to the classmates on their “Team” instead of to faculty. In TBL students must actively prepare for class ahead of time or risk being an ineffective team member. Classroom time is consequently spent applying course concepts rather than students passively learning from their instructors. The presentation will discuss the theoretical underpinnings of TBL and evidence that supports the model. Participants will participant in a practice TBL session and be provided with TBL resources.
Objectives:
1. Topic I –Cohen – Clinical Learning Team Learning Objectives: 1. By the end of this sessions the participants will be able to describe an innovative precepting model which pairs students and utilizes a student-to-student mentoring model 2. By the end of the session the participants will discuss the benefits of the “clinical learning pairs model.” 3. By the end of this session the participants will be able to articulate the challenges to the implementation “clinical learning pairs” and discuss how those problems may be anticipated and planned for.
2. Topic II –Willmarth - iPad Technology in the Classroom & Clinical Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to verbalize how teaching on the iPad benefits student learning. 2. Participants can demonstrate use of iPad applications that are both clinically and classroom relevant. 3. Participants will gain understanding of the use of technology to enhance student outcomes.
3. III – Zeilinski -Team Based Learning 1. Participants will understand the theoretical underpinnings of TBL and the evidence to support its effectiveness in education. 2. Attendees will practice concepts by participating in a TBL practice session 3. At the completion of this workshop attendees will be prepared to apply the basic concepts of TBL in the classroom and be provided TBL resources



The Need for Speed: An Examination and Case Review of Oxytocin (Mis)Use in Labor
Friday, May 16, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Tekoa King , CNM, MPH
Jay Kelley , JD


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Despite near-universal use for several decades and the development of devices to improve safe administration, oxytocin continues to be associated with more adverse events during childbirth than any other drug (Clark, et al. 2009). There is disagreement among clinicians regarding the dose and the intervals between dosage increases where some providers elect for more aggressive protocols aimed to shorten the time to birth (Simpson, 2011). Midwives advocate for physiologic labor and the use medical intervention, including oxytocin , only as indicated by maternal or fetal factors. This session will provide attendees with the knowledge of evidence-based practice recommendations for the safe use of oxytocin during labor. A review of claims involving allegations of oxytocin misuse under midwife-led care will also be presented to guide practice improvements to minimize risk.
Objectives:
1. Understand the scope of the issue of oxytocin use and misuse from clinical and legal perspectives.
2. Understand the maternal and fetal risks from oxytocin infusion during labor.
3. Understand the evidence-based recommendations for the safe use of oxytocin during labor and birth.
4. Learn strategies to reduce risk while using oxytocin in midwife-attended labor and birth.
5. Understand the litigation process and outcomes for oxytocin use from a review of closed claims involving the use of oxytocin under midwife-led care.



To VBAC or Not to VBAC
Friday, May 16, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Angela Wilson-Liverman , MSN, CNM, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Session Description:
This presentation will examine the latest evidence regarding Trial of Labor after Cesarean Section (TOLAC). Factors affecting success and candidate selection will be discussed. TOLAC after two prior cesarean sections will be discussed as well as how to counsel your patients and predict success using VBAC calculators.
Objectives:
1. Attendees will describe data regarding safety of TOLAC based on a patient's individual history
2. Attendees will describe evidence-based counseling for patients regarding TOLAC
3. Attendees will utilize a VBAC calculator to estimate the likelihood of successful VBAC

Friday, May 16, 2014 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Maternal Health Care and Health Systems Strengthening: Driver or Outcome?
Friday, May 16, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Helen de Pinho, MBBCh, MBA, FCCH


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
In the scramble to meet the 2015 MDG deadline, efforts to reduce maternal deaths and improve maternal care in high risk countries have at times become atomized; there is a widening gap between de jure policies and the de facto realities on the ground; and where countries have approached attainment of their maternal MDG at national level, this has occurred by vastly increasing inequalities between urban and rural populations. The aim of this presentation is to refocus efforts to reduce maternal mortality back towards health systems strengthening. Drawing on published studies, and our own research within the Averting Maternal Death and Disability Program, this presentation will define what is meant by health systems strengthening, as distinct from health systems support; discuss the goals of health system strengthening – namely improved health outcomes, responsiveness, social and financial risk protection and equity, and what this means for maternal health programs; and explore how addressing maternal and newborn mortality can contribute to achieving the goals of health systems strengthening. Finally, as the field moves towards universal health coverage (UHC) as an umbrella goal for health in the post-2015 development agenda, the presentation will reflect upon the potential to substantially strengthen health systems through the convergence of UHC and human resources for health, with specific reference to midwifery.
Objectives:
1. Define health systems strengthening and list the goals of health systems strengthening.
2. Distinguish between health system support and health system strengthening in the context of maternal health care.
3. .Explore how addressing maternal and newborn mortality can contribute to achieving the goals of health systems strengthening
4. Discuss the potential to substantially strengthen health systems through the convergence of universal health coverage and human resources for health, with specific reference to midwifery.



Perinatal mood disorders: A midwifery model for assessment, diagnosis, and management, incorporating latest research and recommendations.
Friday, May 16, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Sharon Demeter, MA, MS, CNM
Jenna Shaw-Battista, PhD, NP, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Mood disorders are the single most common perinatal disorder. Despite being ubiquitous, mood disorders are significantly under-reported and undertreated. Stigma and challenges interpreting the research literature account for some of this under treatment. Taking into account new DSM-V diagnostic criteria, treatment recommendations are given based on best evidence. Providers will be given enough detailed information to competently manage perinatal mood disorders by the conclusion of the presentation.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, the participant should be able to demonstrate the following knowledge. Estimate the incidence of perinatal mood disorders, and explain factors which account for the significant under-reporting of symptoms by affected women. Identify the risk factors for such mood disorders. Describe women’s experience of mood disorders in the perinatal period, cultural influences on the experience, and how the midwifery model of care can be utilized to best support and treat such women’s experience.
2. .At the end of the session, the participant should be able to demonstrate the following knowledge. Name two available assessment tools, describe their proper administration and interpretation, and discuss each questionnaire’s respective strengths and weaknesses. Outline recommended protocols for timing of assessment. List three challenges to diagnosis during the perinatal period, barriers to diagnosis, and scope of care for midwives and NPs.
3. At the conclusion of the presentaiton, the participatnt should be able to describe recent changes in diagnostic criteria for mood disorders, based on the 2013 release of the DSM-V.
4. By the end of the session, the participant will be able to formulate a complete treatment plan for perinatal mood disorders, including non-pharmacological treatment options and their efficacy rates.
5. Participants will be able to identify appropriate research questions in perinatal mood disorders, list challenges in interpreting the literature, and describe current best recommendations by the end of the session. In addition, they will be able to outline proper client education, and summarize guidelines for the selection of medications in pregnancy and postpartum.
6. By the end of the session, participants should be able to manage pharmacological treatment of perinatal mood disorders including an understanding of initiation, titration, and cessation of treatment; and determine best medication options for pregnancy and breastfeeding.



Preserving the Midwife - Reducing Burnout in the Profession
Friday, May 16, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Ginger Breedlove, CNM, PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Burnout has been coined as a psychological syndrome in response to chronic interpersonal stressors on the job. This session will provide an overview of symptoms of burnout, and its professional and personal consequences. Burned out healthcare professionals are more likely to deliver services which are suboptimal, and suffer from neglect of self and family. Evidence based recommendations to promote provider resiliency and career-sustaining behaviors will be discussed.
Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to evaluate their personal work-life balance using a Worklife Survey.
2. Participants will be able to describe the sequential stages of burnout that often challenge health professionals.
3. Participants will explore ways to increase resiliency and longevity in the workplace, and harmony in the home.
4. Participants will have an increased awareness of the looming OB provider-type workforce shortage in the US, and shortage of midwives internationally.



Transgender Primary Care
Friday, May 16, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Simon Ellis, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Midwives provide a wide range of services to our clients, including preventative care, primary care, and hormonal therapies across the lifespan. As more and more transgender individuals seek our services, midwives must build our skills to meet the needs of this population. This is a beyond-the-basics workshop geared toward midwives who already have an understanding of gender identity issues. Topics will include: health care needs of transgender patients, creating a friendly and supportive practice, clinical protocols for gender affirming hormone therapy, surgical referrals and follow up, and gender affirming clerical services. For those new to this topic, please first attend our Transgender 101 workshop.
Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to identify at least 5 health care disparities experienced by transgender communities
2. Participants will be able to describe at least 2 models of care for initiating gender affirming treatments
3. Participants will be able to describe clinical protocols for initiating and monitoring gender affirming hormone therapy
4. Participants will be able to identify the preventative care needs of individuals undergoing gender affirming hormone therapy
5. Participants will be able to identify the specific gynecological care needs of individuals undergoing gender affirming hormone therapy
6. Participants will be able to identify resources for increasing their knowledge and clinical skills related to gender identity



Vaginal Breech Birth
Friday, May 16, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Michael Hall, MD, FACOG


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Tips and Tricks for a successful vaginal breech birth. Discussion will center on appropriate criteria selection; consent issues; traditional lithotomy position; all fours position; and piper forceps.
Objectives:
1. Participant will be able to define the selection criteria for a vaginal breech birth attempt.
2. Participant will be able to adequately and fully discuss the risks, complications, and alternatives to vaginal breech birth.
3. Participant will learn the appropriate clinical maneuvers for a successful vaginal breech birth, and what not to do.
4. Participants will learn about the clinical aspects of delivery of a vaginal breech in the all fours position.
5. Participants will learn when piper forceps are indicated.

Friday, May 16, 2014 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Promoting Physiologic Birth: The ACNM BirthTOOLS Kit
Friday, May 16, 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Lisa Low, PhD CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This session will provide an overview of the recently released ACNM BirthTOOLS.org website which offers key resources and materials to implement practices that promote physiologic birth. The BirthTOOLS (TOOLS stands for Tools to Optimize Outcomes of Labor Safely) kit offers all maternity care providers the evidence base behind care practices that support physiologic birth. Then specific information is provided to actually put into practice the goals of the Consensus Statement on Physiologic Normal Birth developed by the three national midwifery organizations. Topics include promoting spontaneous labor, promoting the progress of labor, comfort measures in labor, physiologic approaches to second stage labor and many more. Tools available include methods to assess comfort, strategies to avoid disrupting labor during the admission process, case studies from hospitals that successfully implement some of the care practice the consensus statement encourages such as skin to skin contact, and policies for intermitting monitoring and strategies to support delayed cord clamping to name a few. Audit tools, exemplar hospital policies and case study examples are also available. These valuable resources are all located at www.BirthTOOLS.org, a web based program that all maternity care providers can access and use to support physiologic approaches to labor and birth.
Objectives:
1. Identify key approaches to supporting laboring women that promote normal physiologic birth.
2. Decribe the purpose and focus of the ACNM BirthTOOLS.org website.
3. Review key points of evidence to support selected items from the "menu of change" of the tool kit that promote physiologic birth including fetal well being, comfort and coping, physiologic promotion of progress in labor and care practices for the mother baby dyad.
4. Discuss opportunities to use the ACNM BirthTOOLS tool kit website to meet national NCQF perinatal quality indicators in hospital settings.
5. Access the BirthTOOLS website and explore the varied resources that are available to use in maternity care settings.



Providing Students with Difficult Feedback: Using Kindness, Honesty, and Grace
Friday, May 16, 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Tonya Nicholson, DNP, CNM, WHNP-BC
Rhonda Arthur, FNP, CNM, WHNP-BC


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
Didactic and clinical educators often struggle with having the hard conversations with students. Learn to balance your empathy with students and the need to provide honest feedback to a student who is struggling academically, clinically, or professionally. This presentation will help make the difficult conversations a little bit easier.
Objectives:
1. Participants will recognize the professional obligation to provide timely feedback to students who are not meeting clinical, professional and/or ethical practice standards
2. Participants will identify personal barriers to providing honest negative feedback
3. Participants will learn strategies for having difficult conversations in the clinical area.
4. Participants will value communication strategies that utilize kindness, honesty, and grave that can beused in clinical teaching.



Screening for Substance Abuse in Women's Health: implications for midwifery practice
Friday, May 16, 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Daisy Goodman, CNM, DNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This presentation will discuss the importance of integrating screening for drug and alcohol use into women's health and perinatal care. Validated screening tools available to clinicians will be described, as well as strategies for implementing screening into clinical practice. Coding and billing for substance abuse screening in the primary care setting under the Affordable Care Act will be addressed. Appropriate follow up for women who screen positive will be discussed. Finally, the legal and ethical implications of screening for drug and alcohol use will be explored, with a special emphasis on screening during pregnancy.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, participants should have increased knowledge of the benefits of screening for substance abuse as an integral part of women's health and prenatal care.
2. At the end of the session, participants should be able to identify appropriate screening tools for assessing risk for problem drug and alcohol use in women.
3. At the end of the session, participants should be able to describe legal and ethical implications associated with screening pregnant women for drug and alcohol use.
4. At the end of the session, participants should demonstrate knowledge of provisions in the Affordable Care Act for incorporating screening for substance use into primary care practice.
5. At the end of the session, participants should demonstrate knowledge of SAMHSA's SBIRT(Screening, Brief intervention and Referral for Treatment)protocol.



The Nuts and Bolts of How to Make Change in an Organization
Friday, May 16, 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Ana Delgado, CNM, MS


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Midwifery Matters - Business
Session Description:
Many midwives want to make change that supports normalcy in birth in their institutions. However, many lack experience with making change at the institutional level. Come learn practical tips on how to achieve change that will benefit the families you care for an create a more satisfying work environment.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant will be able to identify common barriers to change in health care institutions.
2. At the end of the session the participant will be able to identify resources on a local and national level for achieving change.
3. At the end of the session the participant will be able to name at least 3 practical tips for relationship building and in-reach within their practice setting.



Vaccines during Pregnancy: Addressing the Myths and Misconceptions
Friday, May 16, 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Sonja Rasmussen, MD, MS


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Vaccination during pregnancy with certain vaccines can prevent hospitalizations and deaths in pregnant women and their infants. Currently two vaccines, inactivated influenza and the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap), are recommended for use by all pregnant women by the U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Several studies have shown that recommendation and offer of vaccines by health-care providers are essential to women’s decision-making regarding vaccines during pregnancy. This presentation will review the evidence supporting recommendations regarding vaccinations for pregnant women, discuss the motivators and barriers for pregnant women to receive recommended vaccines, and address the most common concerns raised by patients about vaccines. Information about resources available to health-care providers and pregnant women about vaccines during pregnancy will also be shared.
Objectives:
1. Understand the evidence that supports vaccination during pregnancy with influenza and Tdap vaccines, including the protection provided to mothers and infants and data on safety of these vaccines
2. Identify the key barriers and motivators for pregnant women to receive recommended vaccines, including the importance of health-care provider recommendation
3. Discuss the most common concerns held by patients about vaccines and ways to address them

Friday, May 16, 2014 4:45PM - 5:45PM
Asking The Tough Questions: Obstetrical Screening for Depression, Drug Abuse, and Domestic Violence
Friday, May 16, 4:45PM - 5:45PM
Presented by:
Donna Dunn, PhD, CNM, FNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The topic of the presentation is screening for depression, drug abuse, and domestic violence during pregnancy. The purpose is to educate healthcare providers about valid and reliable resources useful for properly screening obstetrical patients for depression, drug abuse, and domestic violence. Pregnancy is a unique period in which women receive an abundance of medical care and allows healthcare providers to be more likely to detect and manage these diagnoses. As many as 13% of pregnant women experience major depression during pregnancy, and the rates could be as high as 20% of women experiencing minor. Rates of depression seem to increase in the second and third trimester. Previous research has demonstrated that detection rates for depression may be as low as 0.8%. Depression during pregnancy increases the risk of having preterm delivery and low birth weight infants. Substance abuse during pregnancy is a concern for maternal and child health. Rates of drug abuse during pregnancy range from 4.0% for illicit drug use to 11.8% for current alcohol use. In the United States, nearly 90% of women abusing drugs are reproductive age. Drug abuse can increase the risk of miscarriage, premature labor, low birth-weight babies, and intrauterine fetal demise. Rates of domestic violence are not known, previous studies demonstrate rates as high as 20% during pregnancy. Often times, women report that the first incidence of domestic violence occurred during pregnancy. Domestic violence during pregnancy can lead to a higher rate of miscarriage, neonatal death, and maternal depression. Based on the most current Evidence Based Practice guidelines, healthcare providers should routinely screen for depression, drug abuse, and domestic violence throughout pregnancy. Screening all patients should help identify who needs intervention and treatment. Therefore, it is the responsibility of the healthcare provider to routinely screen for these three important diagnoses during pregnancy.
Objectives:
1. Describe the incidence and prevalence of depression, drug abuse, and domestic violence during pregnancy.
2. Recognize the need to incorporate screening for depression, drug abuse, and domestic violence into prenatal care.
3. Identify applicable screening tools that may be used in clinical setting to screen for depression, drug abuse, and domestic violence.



Office Gynecology Update
Friday, May 16, 4:45PM - 5:45PM
Presented by:
Jan Shepherd, MD, F.A.C.O.G


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Nurse midwives involved in gynecologic care confront certain clinical issues on a daily basis. This session will provide brief updates on some of these, including the newest guidelines on performance and follow up of Pap tests, current trends in contraception, and recent developments in the management of menopausal issues.
Objectives:
1. Identify the most recent guidelines for frequency of Pap testing and management of abnormal Pap test results
2. Describe current trends in contraception and the evidence supporting those trends
3. Discuss recently generated evidence regarding risks and benefits of Menopausal Hormone Therapy and available alternatives for management of menopausal issues



The Giving Voice Study: Navajo Patients' Perspectives on Accessing Native Medicine Care
Friday, May 16, 4:45PM - 5:45PM
Presented by:
Barbara Overman, CNM, MSN, MPH, PhD
Ursula Knoki-Wilson, CNM, MSN,MPH
Dorinda Welle, PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
Health values expressed by Navajo patients when telling their story of receiving care and sharing their views on having native medicine in a contemporary hospital were captured in a qualitative study in 2009. In December 2000, the Chinle Comprehensive Health Care Facility in Chinle, Arizona was the first Indian Health Service in the United States to offer native medicine services through an Office of Native Medicine on a regular operational basis. Findings highlight the complexities Navajo patients experience in accessing, navigating, and combining co-available Western and Native care services. The presentation demonstrates how a cultural safety framework originating in indigenous community scholarship is applied in the principles of inquiry, in the research process, and in Navajo patients’ assessments of the risks and benefits of utilizing Western medical care and Navajo traditional medicine. The hospital context of care presents a significant challenge to cultural safety as patients and practitioners seek to integrate Native medicine and Western medical services.Client stories provide insight into the diverse and at times conflicted experience of receiving care in the two systems. The innovative philosophical and practical cultural safety strategies of Navajo patients seeking Native medicine services through a hospital facility are explored. Native women have the highest likelihood of receiving care from nurse-midwives during labor and birth than women from any other cultural group. Understanding the complexities for women and their families when utilizing co-existing systems of care will assist midwives in providing optimal care for native families.
Objectives:
1. Identify the core concepts and relational approach of the cultural safety framework and its relevance to care among Native Americans.
2. Articulate key barriers and facilitators of Navajo patients’ access to Native medicine in a Western health service.
3. Examine how the dynamics between Western medical and Native medicine systems are evidenced in Navajo participants’ narratives
4. Explore how cultural safety in the research interviews enabled participants to create a narrative with therapeutic value.
5. Consider the implications for patients navigating the “parallel” vs. “integrated” use of Native medicine and Western/allopathic health systems.



The MRSA Superbug in Pregnancy and Beyond: Impacting Patient Outcomes
Friday, May 16, 4:45PM - 5:45PM
Presented by:
Krista Estes, DNP, FNP-C


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
With the emergence and rising prevalence of community acquired MRSA skin and soft tissue infections, it is important to develop best practices among health care providers to improve patient outcomes. This presentation will explore the epidemiology, risk factors, identification, treatment and prevention of MRSA skin and soft tissue infections with an emphasis on pregnancy and postpartum related issues.
Objectives:
1. Understand the epidemiology, risk factors and demographics of community acquired MRSA skin and soft tissue infections.
2. Identify the most common clinical presentation of community acquired MRSA infections seen in pregnancy and postpartum.
3. Utilize current treatment guidelines and appropriate antimicrobial use for uncomplicated MRSA skin and soft tissue infections.
4. Discuss patient education for prevention and further spread of community acquired MRSA skin and soft tissue infections.

Saturday, May 17, 2014 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Current Options for Prenatal Testing: Non-Invasive (NIPT), First Trimester, Integrated, Sequential, and Combination Prenatal Testing
Saturday, May 17, 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Presented by:
Gwen Latendresse, PhD CNM
Angela Deneris, PhD, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This presentation will inform participants of the prenatal screening and testing approaches currently available in the United States, including the most recently introduced first trimester and Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT) options for identifying aneuploidies, such as trisomy 13, 18, and 21. Appropriate timing, selection, and interpretation of prenatal testing will be discussed, as well as appropriate referral to other healthcare providers.
Objectives:
1. At the completion of the workshop participants will be aware of the most recently introduced prenatal testing options, such as Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT) and first trimester screening for aneuploidy.
2. At the completion of the workshop participants will have a working knowledge of current options for prenatal testing, including integrated, sequential and combined testing approaches, first trimester maternal serum markers and ultrasound for fetal nuchal translucency.
3. At the completion of the workshop participants will understand common risk factors and indications for offering prenatal testing to pregnant women, as well as current ACOG recommendations.
4. At the completion of the workshop participants will have the knowledge required for supporting a woman’s well-informed decision-making regarding prenatal testing options, including timing of tests, ethical, personal and societal issues, and referral to geneticists and genetic counselors.



Six is The New Four:Friedman’s Labor Curve Reconsidered
Saturday, May 17, 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Presented by:
Angela Wilson-Liverman , MSN, CNM, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This presentation will examine recent data regarding the natural course of labor. Recent evidence suggests that Friedman's Curve is outdated and that the active phase of labor begins at 6cm dilation. There is also new evidence demonstrating that increasing BMI lengthens labor. Summaries include new recommendations on Preventing the First Cesarean.(repeat w/ updates from ACNM 2013)
Objectives:
1. At the completion of the presentation, attendees will have an understanding of new data on the natural progress of labor in the first stage.
2. At the completion of the presentation, attendees will have a revised understanding of expected progress in the second stage of labor.
3. At the completion of the presentation, attendees will have an understanding of the linear relationship between increasing BMI and length of labor.
4. At the completion of the presentation, attendees will have an understanding of actions, supported by data, which will help Prevent the First Cesarean.



Sleep Disorders: Yours, Hers, Theirs, and Mine.A working session to sleep better.
Saturday, May 17, 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Presented by:
Jennifer Hensley, EdD, CNM, WHNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Education
Session Description:
The last few years we have talked about women's sleep disorders across the life span, but only touched the surface. We have discussed the adverse outcomes of inadequate sleep and shift work that include an increased incidence of hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke, breast and ovarian cancer, dozing behind the wheel and motor vehicle accidents, preventable accidents on the job, anxiety, depression, irritability, attention deficit, and more. During this 1/2 day session, let's work together to help ourselves and other women! Let's look at tools that can be used for diagnosis. Let's look at treatments that really help insomnia, shift work disorder, Willis-Ekbom disease, advanced-and-delayed sleep phase disorder, excessive daytime sleepiness, and obstructive sleep apnea. We ask participants to come with a simple or complex sleep issue to present for discussion. Let's work towards a solution for refreshing, restorative sleep. This session is not a substitute for a sleep referral or sleep study.
Objectives:
1. I. Review the 8 major categories for sleep disorders and the criteria for those disorders most common in women: 1. Insomnia 2. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) 3. Willis-Ekborm disease 4. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS).
2. II. Identify tools to help diagnose the sleep disorder and its severity. A. 2-Week Sleep Diary (we ask participants complete this before the session) B. Insomnia severity scale C. Morningness-Eveningness Scale D. NIH 5 Questions for WED/RLS E. IRLS Scale F. Epworth Sleepiness Scale G. STOP-BANG for OSA
3. III. Review pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic, FDA approved and "off-label", treatments for: 1. Insomnia 2. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) 3. Willis-Ekborm disease 4. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS).
4. IV. Case presentations for participants' discussions A. Symptoms B. Tools for diagnosis C. Severity D. Treatment: Pharmacologic & Non-pharmacologic E. Follow-up (Preferably some would be emailed to presenters ahead of time)
5. V. Recap A. Common sleep disorders B. Tools for diagnosis C. Treatments D. Follow-up
6. VI. Q&A



Teen Pregnancy "CAMP"
Saturday, May 17, 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Presented by:
Steve Scott, MD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
There were 367,752 infants birth to mothers aged 15-19 in 2010.Teen pregnancy has a unique set of challenges, both emotionally and medically. The things we don't think of as medical issues ultimately affect the medical outcome of pregnancy. Teen pregnancies cost the taxpayer $11 billion a year. When a teen has a baby she has up a 12% to 49% chance of having another baby within the same year. Having two teenage births dramatically increases the risk of a premature delivery and a stillbirth with the second baby as well as further decreases the likelihood that the teen will finish high school and increases her likelihood of relying on public assistance. Abortion rates are also very high among teen pregnancies. Half of teen moms don’t graduate high school. Although teen pregnancy rates are slowly decreasing, given the significant health and socioeconomic ramifications with a repeat teen pregnancy, programs such as Teen Pregnancy: CAMP a University of Colorado Hospital program for young pregnant women under the age of 21 can make a difference.
Objectives:
1. At the conclusion of the lecture participants will be able to identify social determinants that effect teen pregnancy.
2. At the conclusion of the lecture participants will understand mental health issues associated with teen pregnancy.
3. At the conclusion of the lecture participants will have knowledge about models of care to address psychosocial issues in teen pregnancy.
4. At the conclusion of the lecture participants will have knowledge regarding models of secondary pregnancy prevention.



Watched Pot Syndrome: Managing Pre-Labor and PRE-Pre-Labor Without Pitocin
Saturday, May 17, 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Presented by:
Mairi Rothman, CNM, MSN


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
We've all received the call: "I think I'm in labor..." and it may be days or even weeks before that mom is actually in active labor. Too often this period of normal unfolding of birth is managed medically--with pitocin or cervical ripening agents. This session offers a look at the forces that come to bear on a woman's physiology during this period, and how our counseling and interventions can influence this delicate dance of hormones to protect physiologic birth and preserve the woman's right and capacity to deliver in her own time. Fetal surveillance and complimentary and alternative modalities will be included.
Objectives:
1. The participant will be able to describe five ways to respond to a client who is having a protracted period of prodromal labor.
2. The participant will be able to compare the benefits and uses of NSTs, AFIs, BPPs and fetal movement counts
3. The participant will be able to describe the interplay between oxytocin, endorphins, and catecholamines, and name 3 strategies to help endorphins win.
4. The participant will be able to identify the 5 elements of success for normal spontaneous vaginal delivery
5. The participant will be able to describe the techniques used by acupuncturists, osteopaths, cranio-sacral therapists, and massage therapists in managing pre-labor and encouraging labor
6. The participant will be able to describe strategies for achieving optimal fetal positioning during the pre-labor period.

Saturday, May 17, 2014 12:45PM - 1:45PM
"I have a sinus infection": Common Respiratory Ailments in Primary Care.
Saturday, May 17, 12:45PM - 1:45PM
Presented by:
Ami Goldstein, MSN, CNM, FNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Many respiratory infections are overtreated with antibiotics. This will be a review of common respiratory complaints from nasal allergies to sinusitis to cough and pneumonia. It will cover diagnosis and management for the midwife to incorporate into daily practice.
Objectives:
1. Differentiate acute rhinosinusitis from the common cold and describe appropriate treatment and timing of treatment for both conditions.
2. Describe allergic rhinitis and name OTC and prescription management options.
3. Distinguish between common causes for a cough including asthma, bronchitis and pneumonia.
4. Describe symptom and medication management for acute bronchitis and community acquired pneumonia
5. State steps for asthma management for initial flare and appropriate referral and care.



Divison of Research (DOR) Research Forum II
Saturday, May 17, 12:45PM - 1:45PM
Presented by:
Carrie Klima, CNM PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
Presented in this forum: 1. Scheduling Strategy for Specialist Nurses to Ensure a 24/7 Presence for Sexual Assault Patients in an Emergency Department ( Meredith J. Scannell, CNM, MPH, MSN) 2. Evaluation of the implementation of the 75-g 2-hour GTT in a Nurse-Midwifery Practice ( Sally Hersh, DNP, CNM) 3. Continuity, Confidence, Compassion and Culture: Lessons learned from Japanese midwives (Allison Shorten, RN, RM, MSc, PhD; Lisa Weinstein, RN; Audrey Muto, RN)



Waterbirth Panel Discussion
Saturday, May 17, 12:45PM - 1:45PM
Presented by:
Shaunti Meyer, CNM, PhD Candidate


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Waterbirth is a growing option for birth across the United States, including Colorado, where the Denver metro area has two hospitals and two freestanding birth centers offering waterbirth. Hydrotherapy in labor has been shown to decrease the use of pharmacologic analgesia, shorten the first stage of labor, and increase women's satisfaction with their birth. During birth, the buoyancy allows women to get into a greater range of positions that can maximize her pelvic dimensions and optimize fetal positioning. Published literature shows no increased risk of maternal or neonatal morbidity or mortality. Certified nurse-midwives from each of the four locations around Denver will present information on waterbirth in their practice, including a discussion of their introduction of waterbirth into their practice and current data on maternal and neonatal outcomes, followed by a question and answer period.
Objectives:
1. Attendees will be able to discuss the state of the science on hydrotherapy during labor and waterbirth and identify possible impacts on maternal and neonatal outcomes.
2. Attendees will be able to identify the difference between hydrotherapy and waterbirth in a hospital midwifery practice versus a freestanding midwifery birth center.
3. Attendees will be able to identify barriers and strategies for starting a new waterbirth practice and how to expand an existing one to include higher risk patients.
4. Attendees will be able to identify how to expand an existing waterbirth to incorporate higher risk patients.



What Women Want: Normal Physiologic Birth?
Saturday, May 17, 12:45PM - 1:45PM
Presented by:
Tanya Tanner, PhD, MBA, RN, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This session will discuss women's choices regarding their maternity care experiences. Why women choose particular providers and how they feel about intervention in light of today's technological society will be addressed. We will present ways to use ACNM's consumer statement "Normal, Healthy Childbirth for Women and Families: What you need to know" as a tool for educating women about the benefits of normal physiologic birth and as a mechanism for introducing women to "think outside the box" and choose the birth that's right for them.
Objectives:
1. Identify reasons why women choose the care providers they do.
2. Discuss common childbirth experiences encountered by today's woman.
3. Explain the development process for the document "Normal, Healthy Childbirth for Women and Families: What you need to know" and identify the evidence behind the concepts contained in the document.
4. Explain how to use the document "Normal, Healthy Childbirth for Women and Families: What you need to know" as a tool for introducing women to the benefits of normal physiologic birth.
5. Describe the process of effective shared decision-making and how to use the document "Normal, Healthy Childbirth for Women and Families: What you need to know" as a tool for engaging in shared decision making with women.



When Babies Can't Feed at Breast: Optimizing the Maternal Milk Supply
Saturday, May 17, 12:45PM - 1:45PM
Presented by:
Karen DeCocker, DNP, CNM
Janet Engstrom, PhD, CNM, WHNP,


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Many infants born prematurely or critically ill are unable to feed directly at the breast for weeks or even months, so mothers are often fully dependent on the use of a breast pump for both the initiation and maintenance of lactation. Many of these women experience problems with providing adequate amounts of human milk. The purpose of this presentation is to summarize the research on initiating and maintaining lactation. This presentation will provide evidence on the best methods of milk expression and interventions that can increase the milk supply.
Objectives:
1. Describe the impact of preterm birth on the initiation of lactation, milk quality and milk volume
2. Describe the methods used to express milk including hand expression and breast pumps.
3. Summarize the recommendations for the frequency and duration of milk expression
4. Identify interventions that can increase the milk supply such as heat, massage, music and imagery.
5. Describe the safe storage and transport for human milk.
6. Describe the safety and effectiveness of commonly used galatagogues.

Saturday, May 17, 2014 3:15PM - 4:15PM
Microbiology Meets Gynecology: The Application of Probiotics to Women’s Primary Health Care
Saturday, May 17, 3:15PM - 4:15PM
Presented by:
Lisa Hanson, PhD, CNM, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Probiotics are food products composed of living microorganisms and, when consumed in sufficient amounts, confer health benefits. Probiotics can be used in both preventive and therapeutic applications as fermented milk products or commercially available supplements. The use of probiotics has been promoted in women’s health to actively enhance the microbiota of the intestines, bladder, and vagina. The current scientific information about other women’s health applications of probiotics will be presented including the management of: gastrointestinal disorders (e.g., constipation, diarrhea), urogynecologic conditions(e.g., vaginitis and urinary tract infection), and reproductive concerns (e.g., infertility and menopausal symptoms). While it is clear that more research is needed, scientific evidence exists that will allow midwives and other women’s health professionals to recommend probiotics for the prevention and treatment of a variety of health concerns.
Objectives:
1. Describe the microbiology of women’s health and the implications for probiotic enhancement.
2. Describe probiotic dietary supplements, including strains, dosages, and routes, in sufficient detail to make effective selection recommendations and prescriptive decisions.
3. Review the issues of safety and acceptability of probiotics.
4. Discuss the clinical uses of probiotics to prevent and treat a variety of women’s primary health care issues.
5. Critically analyze the state of the science concerning probiotics used in women’s primary health care, including the benefits and gaps in knowledge.



Not Just Old Age: Practice Changes In Health Maintenance and Wellness For the Maturing Woman
Saturday, May 17, 3:15PM - 4:15PM
Presented by:
Jane Kass-Wolff, PhD, FNP, WHNP
Ernestine Kotthoff-Burrell, PhD, APRN, FAANP


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
With increasing numbers of women reaching old age the complexity of health care for these women will increase. This presentation will discuss current health promotion guidelines and immunizations for the older woman. Key assessments that are relevant and should be performed at each visit will be reviewed including depression and dementia and how to differentiate them. Finally the most commonly seen gynecologic problems will be discussed with treatment options including use of Beers Criteria to determine appropriateness of drugs for the aging woman.
Objectives:
1. Describe current evidence-based health promotion guidelines for the older woman.
2. Differentiate between depression and dementia in the older woman.
3. Formulate an appropriate plan of care for the most common gynecologic complaints in the older woman.
4. Select medications for the older woman based on Beers criteria.



Quality Improvement Panel Series Highlighting Midwives Moving Mountains. The New York State Experience
Saturday, May 17, 3:15PM - 4:15PM
Presented by:
Diana Jolles, MSN,CNM
Cathy Collins-Fulea, MSN, CNM, FACNM
Brenda Quatrochi, CNM MSN
Eliza Burelle, CNM MSN
Jessica Schwarz, CNM MSN
Julie Paul, CNM, DNP
Heather Thompson, PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Midwifery Matters - Business
Session Description:
A panel comprised of four midwives from the New York State Affiliate share their success with quality assurance and quality improvement. As last years Benchmarking Affiliate Winners, this group demonstrates best practice in data collection, reporting and utilization.
Objectives:
1. 1. Participants discuss the quality assurance and quality improvement achievements of the New York Affiliate.
2. 2. Participants assess how the affiliate organized to increase participation in data collection and reporting.
3. 3. Participants demonstrate how panelists used the following items: i. Press Release Announcement of “Best Practice” ii. Affiliate level documentation of community need and midwifery’s role in increasing access to high value care on the affiliate level. iii. Perinatal profile report containing midwifery performance on nationally endorsed quality measures. iv. Return on Investment Report

Saturday, May 17, 2014 3:15PM - 4:45PM
Moving Midwifery Forward: the fight for the place of the CM in American Midwifery and why CNMs should care
Saturday, May 17, 3:15PM - 4:45PM
Presented by:
Patricia Burkhardt, CM, DrPH
Shawna King, CM, LM
Elizabeth Kazmierczak, SN
Christiane McClosky, CM, LM
Janet Schwab, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery, Miscellaneous
Session Description:
Midwives, both certified midwives (CM) and certified nurse midwives (CNM), educated through ACME accredited programs and certified through the AMCB, are among the most highly educated midwives in the world. Though identical to the CNM in both education and scope of practice, the CM is currently recognized in only a handful of states. Yet, the CM credential provides unique opportunities to enhance and grow the profession of midwifery through streamlining the educational process and the promotion of independent practice. Though the routes to enter the midwifery profession differ between the CNM and the CM, the end result is midwives with the same knowledge, skills and scope of practice. Midwifery itself is inherently autonomous and independent of all other external groups, i.e., nursing, medicine and insurance companies. This independence is often challenged when other agencies dictate midwifery process and practices. These external forces may often impose upon, and overtly influence, the model of midwifery practice. Through the provision of a direct-entry route into ACME accredited schools, and certification from the AMCB, we can prepare midwives who will practice from midwifery’s own distinct philosophy and model of care. This immediately addresses a way of exponentially increasing AMCB credentialed midwives practicing in the U.S. Focusing on midwifery as an independent profession increases membership and heightens awareness of issues and practice barriers currently facing many U.S. midwives, e.g., access to hospital privileges, reimbursement for critical midwifery care, etc. A stronger midwifery profession with increased power as well as Federal recognition of all AMCB accredited midwives can address more effectively these barriers once it sees itself and it’s interests as independent. Recognition of the CM in all 50 states, through the development of the necessary structures and processes for education and licensure, will benefit all AMCB credentialed midwives.
Objectives:
1. Describe the history and evolution of the certified midwife credential of ACNM/AMCB
2. Define the implications for practice with a CM credential including: Hospital privileges, malpractice insurance, health insurance plans, federal legislation
3. Elaborate the challenges for the education of midwives as distinct professionals Placement of midwifery Masters programs (allied health, medicine, etc.)? Placement of pre-midwifery bachelor’s program How to develop business programs for clinicians including entrepreneurial skills Negotiation with nursing leadership to clarify the relationship between midwifery and nursing
4. Describe the national and international impact of expanding the cadre of CMs Why should CNMs care? ICM standards reflect the need for midwifery as a distinct profession to meet the global need for maternity care providers
5. Strategize a plan for the future Obtain federal recognition of all AMCB certified midwives Develop state legislation/regulation for midwifery as a separate and distinct profession Develop model licensing legislative and exam language Explore mechanisms for midwifery governance under the law that is in the hands of licensed midwives, e.g., Board of Midwifery, Midwifery Committee within another board, etc.

Saturday, May 17, 2014 4:30PM - 5:30PM
Completing the Circle of Safety Through Competency Based Education
Saturday, May 17, 4:30PM - 5:30PM
Presented by:
Cecilia Jevitt, CNM, PhD, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
Do you dread trying to match students' experience with available clinical sites? Are you a preceptor who isn't sure how to juggle students who need more time in clinical practice with those who are competent quickly? Midwifery students come with varied experiences and competencies. Competency based education (CBE), now promoted by the International Confederation of Midwives for basic midwifery education, allows educators and clinical preceptors to tailor learning experiences to student needs and more efficiently use clinical learning hours. This presentation explores the latest in competency based education using the Varney Circle of Safety concept and gives examples of using CBE to maximize student learning and preceptor time.
Objectives:
1. 1. compare and contrast competency based learning programs with those that use accumulated clinical hours and knowledge retention testing for outcomes assessment
2. 2. discuss the components needed for competency based education and assessment
3. 3. discuss the use of competency based education in health professions outside of midwifery
4. 4. describe Varney's Circle of Safety concept and apply it to the planning and evaluation of students' clinical learning
5. 5.apply the concepts of competency based learning and assessment in order to design clinical experiences for at least three levels of new student experience



Current Treatment of Osteoporosis and Vitamin D Deficiency
Saturday, May 17, 4:30PM - 5:30PM
Presented by:
Micahel McDermott, MD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Will discuss the diagnosis of osteoporosis and the evaluation for secondary causes. Will discuss who should be treated and will review all available non-pharmacologic and FDA approved pharmacological therapies for Osteoporosis. Will review the evaluation and management of nutritional and complex causes of Vitamin D Deficiency.
Objectives:
1. Review the diagnosis of osteoporosis and evaluation for secondary causes of bone loss.
2. Discuss indications for treatment osteoporosis and the use of the FRAX tool for treatment of osteopenia.
3. Explain the mechanism of action of available osteoporosis therapies and their clinical use.
4. Discuss vitamin D deficiency from nutritional causes and malabsorption and treatment strategies for these situations.



If Not a “Sage on the Stage,” then What? A Lively Guide for Midwifery Educators and Aspirants
Saturday, May 17, 4:30PM - 5:30PM
Presented by:
Terri Clark, PhD, CNM, ARNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
To meet the needs of a 21st century health care system there is a global call for transformation in methods of teaching in professional education. This session will discuss those needs and describe a variety of effective teaching methods for achieving learning goals. Furthermore, potential barriers to sustainability and satisfaction in a career of teaching and practice will be discussed, and strategies for how they can be overcome.
Objectives:
1. Articulate why transformation of both philosophy and methods of teaching are needed in health professional education for the 21st century.
2. Describe a variety of effective teaching methods for achieving both clinical and humane learning competencies.
3. List potential barriers to sustainability and satisfaction in a career of teaching and practice, and strategies for how they can be overcome.



Intrahepatic cholestasis of Pregnancy: the dangerous itch
Saturday, May 17, 4:30PM - 5:30PM
Presented by:
Susan Krause, CNM, MSN


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Managing pruritis in pregnancy can be a challanging clinical situation. Of pruritic conditions that complicate pregnancy, only intrahepatic cholestasis carries increase mobidity and mortality for the fetus. This presentation discusses diagnosis and management of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Differentiating between ICP and other pruritic dermatoses of pregnancy will be reviewed.
Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to differentiate between the presentation of ICP and other pruritic conditions affecting pregnancy
2. Participants will become familiar with the interdisciplinary management of ICP
3. Participants will become familiar with the pharmacologic agents used to treat ICP



Raising the Bar: Integrating Oral Health into Women’s Standards of Care
Saturday, May 17, 4:30PM - 5:30PM
Presented by:
Barbara Overman, CNM, MSN, MPH, PhD
Christine Cogil, CFNP, MSN, DNPc


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The role of oral health status and oral care in pregnancy and primary care outcomes is critically examined in this presentation. Presenters challenge nurse midwives to lead in "putting the mouth back in the body" by integrating expanded oral health services into midwifery care. Pathophysiology, natural history and epidemiology of the most common oral health conditions are elaborated. The presentation details an efficient, straightforward expanded oral exam suitable for midwifery and primary care and presents tools to assist midwives in enhancing the oral health components of midwifery practice.
Objectives:
1. Identify myths, beliefs and variations on perceived risks of dental care during pregnancy.
2. Analyze interrelationships between women’s oral health status and health conditions including pregnancy outcomes and children’s oral health.
3. Increase knowledge of the most common oral health conditions, pathophysiology and progression inclusive of caries, periodontitis and common oral lesions.
4. Learn components and techniques for an efficient enhanced oral physical exam suitable for primary care midwifery practice.
5. Identify clinical resources , screening and self-management tools and preventive management strategies suitable for integrating into midwifery practice.
Online Registration Powered by The Multisoft Group