ACNM's 58th Annual Meeting & Exhibition
ACNM Program Lisiting
Program Listing
Below is the program schedule for the ACNM's 58th Annual Meeting & Exhibition. You can search for keywords in the session title or filter by track (as defined by authors) using the search options below.
 
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Tuesday, May 28, 2013 12:00PM - 4:00PM
WK06 Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics (ALSO) Provider Course - 3 Day Course
Tuesday, May 28, 12:00PM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Diana Winslow, RN, BSN


CEUs = 1.3
Rx =
Fee = $500.00
Student Fee = $250.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
The Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics (ALSO) program helps maternity care providers develop the knowledge and skills needed to manage potential emergencies during the perinatal period. With pre-course syllabus reading and minimal lecture time, this course offers an interactive learning environment utilizing pelvic mannequins and other appropriate medical equipment. Evidence-based, hands-on skill/team building is what sets the ALSO Program above other maternity care programs. Participants will obtain five-year ALSO status after successful completion of the written test and megadelivery testing station. Space is limited to 60 participants. Participants must attend all three days.
Objectives:
1. 1. Discuss methods of managing pregnancy and birth urgencies and emergencies, which may help standardize the skills of practicing maternity care providers.
2. 2. Validate content and skill acquisition as demonstrated by successful completion of the course written examination and megadelivery skills testing station.
3. 3. Discuss and demonstrate teamwork and communication tools that improve safety in maternity care.

Wednesday, May 29, 2013 8:00AM - 12:00PM
WK21 Affiliate Skills Workshop
Wednesday, May 29, 8:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
TBD


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Session Description:
No description available at time of publication

Wednesday, May 29, 2013 8:00AM - 4:00PM
WK01 Learning to Read Ultrasound Images
Wednesday, May 29, 8:00AM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Cydney Menihan, CNM MSN RDMS
Betty Kay Taylor, CNM, MSN, RDMS
Anthony Lathrop, CNM, RDMS, PhD


CEUs = 0.7
Rx =
Fee = $250.00
Student Fee = $125.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This didactic workshop has been designed to provide midwives with the necessary foundation for performing and interpreting ultrasound exams. Topics include: images acquisition, fetal anatomic ultrasound landmarks for biometry, assessment of fetal well being (BPP and AFI), as well as image interpretation practice session. THERE WILL BE NO HANDS-ON PRACTICE.
Objectives:
1. Correctly adjust ultrasound image acquisition utilizing ultrasound physics and the instrumentation.
2. Identify fetal anatomic landmarks for obtaining biometric measurements in all trimester.
3. Recognize the four ultrasound components of a biophysical profile and score each parameter.
4. Differentiate between the two common methods of assessing amniotic fluid, and determine correct caliper placement for measurements.
5. Recognize and interpret practice images.



WK02 Vacuum Assisted Birth in Midwifery Practice
Wednesday, May 29, 8:00AM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Phyllis Clark, CNM, MPH


CEUs = 0.7
Rx =
Fee = $250.00
Student Fee = $125.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Assisting birth with a vacuum extractor is an advanced practice skill not included in basic midwifery education programs. It is not indicated for all practice settings or for all midwife providers. While vacuum assisted birth can be life saving and brain sparing for the baby and prevent unnecessary cesarean section for the mother, it is an operative delivery with attendant risks and increased liability for the midwife if there is less than an optimal outcome. This workshop is designed to assist the midwife to utilize the ACNM publication Vacuum Assisted Birth in Midwifery Practice to determine whether or not it is appropriate to incorporate vacuum assisted delivery into her practice. The workshop will give the midwife the opportunity for simulated practice of the skill, but certification of competency will require additional supervised practice in the clinical setting as determined by her collaborating physician(s) and the hospital where she practices that must grant her privileges to perform vacuum extraction.A short review of the mechanism of labor will be followed by an overview of the history and principles of the vacuum extractor, a review of the literature to assist in determining practice guidelines, and a summary of risk management issues. Factors needed to evaluate the appropriateness of midwifery use of the vacuum in the clinical setting and how to implement the additional skill into practice will be addressed. After demonstration, participants will practice the procedure in small groups using vacuum extractors with grapefruit, then with baby and pelvis models. A process for educating midwives to perform this procedure will be introduced and methods of evaluating the competency of midwives using a skill evaluation tool will be discussed. Fee for the workshop includes the ACNM publication Vacuum Assisted Birth in Midwifery Practice.
Objectives:
1. "State indications and contraindications for the use of the vacuum extractor "
2. Demonstrate the steps for using the vacuum extractor using fetal and pelvic models and a skills checklist, including identification of the flexion point.
3. Identify the essential steps for adding the vacuum extractor to midwifery practice and for confirming that appropriate guidelines are in place.



WK03 ACNM Full Day Exam Prep Content Review Course (Day 1)
Wednesday, May 29, 8:00AM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Melissa Willmarth, DNP, CNM, APRN
Alisha Morgan, MSN, CNM
Nicole Lassiter, CNM, MSN, WHNP-BC
Kelly Wilhite, DNP, CNM
Julie Paul, DNP, CNM
Marianne Moore, PhD(c), MSN, CNM
Susan Yount, PhD, CNM, WHNP-BC
Lynneece Rooney, MSN, RNC-OB, CNM


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $250.00
Student Fee = $125.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
This two day workshop will provide students and new graduates an opportunity for exam preparation. Day one will focus on the content covered by the AMCB certification exam. Experts in each topic will give students an overview of the content with an opportunity to begin formulating a plan of study. Day two will explore interactive case studies and practice questions on the main topical areas for the AMCB midwifery examination. Students can register for one or both days. At the conclusion of the sessions, students should will have completed an individualized plan for continuing review.
Objectives:
1. Participants will understand all aspects of the AMCB national certification exam including the exam blueprint, scoring and how to apply apply.
2. Participants will complete content review as well as practice tests through the use of integrative case studies and exam questions.
3. Participants will be able to verbalize rationales for appropriate questions.
4. Participants will develop a comprehensive plan for additional board review.



WK04 Scar Tissue Remediation: Techniques and Pearls of Practice for Midwives
Wednesday, May 29, 8:00AM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Sarah Shealy, CNM, IBCLC
Ellen Heed


CEUs = 0.7
Rx =
Fee = $250.00
Student Fee = $125.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Scar tissue caused by birth or surgical trauma is debilitating for many women. Both c-sections and vaginal deliveries can be followed by chronic pain, limited mobility, lack of normal sexual function all related to scar tissue. This workshop day will include an in depth review of the bio-dynamics of scar tissue and an introduction to simple techniques midwives can incorporate into their practice to help increase the resiliency of scar tissue. Practical hands on techniques will be taught and participants may choose their level of interaction.
Objectives:
1. Describe musculature, organs, erectile tissue and enervation of the pelvic floor
2. Describe the role of engorgement in arousal, labor and birth and changes in female pelvic anatomy during states of arousal
3. Develop increased acuity in perception of bony motility.
4. Describe how connective tissue can impact the functionality of the organs of the pelvic floor
5. Demonstrate hands on perception and identification of scar tissue
6. Use techniques for scar tissue remediation



WK06 Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics (ALSO) Provider Course - 3 Day Course
Wednesday, May 29, 8:00AM - 4:00PM
Presented by:
Diana Winslow, RN, BSN


CEUs = 1.3
Rx =
Fee = $500.00
Student Fee = $250.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
The Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics (ALSO) program helps maternity care providers develop the knowledge and skills needed to manage potential emergencies during the perinatal period. With pre-course syllabus reading and minimal lecture time, this course offers an interactive learning environment utilizing pelvic mannequins and other appropriate medical equipment. Evidence-based, hands-on skill/team building is what sets the ALSO Program above other maternity care programs. Participants will obtain five-year ALSO status after successful completion of the written test and megadelivery testing station. Space is limited to 60 participants. Participants must attend all three days.
Objectives:
1. 1. Discuss methods of managing pregnancy and birth urgencies and emergencies, which may help standardize the skills of practicing maternity care providers.
2. 2. Validate content and skill acquisition as demonstrated by successful completion of the course written examination and megadelivery skills testing station.
3. 3. Discuss and demonstrate teamwork and communication tools that improve safety in maternity care.

Wednesday, May 29, 2013 8:30AM - 12:00PM
WK08 Preparing the Future: ACNM Annual Preceptor Workshop
Wednesday, May 29, 8:30AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Judy Lazarus, MSN, CNM, ARNP
Jackie Martin, DNP, CNM
Elizabeth Gabzdyl, CNM, DNP, ANP


CEUs = 0.35
Rx = 0.35
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
Clinical preceptors play a vital role in the education of nurse midwifery students. As a profession, we need a large and available pool of preceptors to help prepare our next generation of nurse midwives. This annual preceptor workshop, sponsored by the Preceptor Development and Support Committee, is directed to both the novice and the experienced preceptor. This half day workshop will address pertinent topics from 'working with students in a busy clinic day' to 'inspiring our partners to become preceptors'. The presentation will include resources for preceptors and opportunities to share and practice precepting skills.
Objectives:
1. Preceptors will be able to discuss ways to integrate students into a busy clinical setting
2. Preceptors will be able to demonstrate the ability to objectively assess and evaluate student skills.
3. Preceptors will be able to draw from a variety of tools to effectively communicate with students and faculty.
4. Preceptors will be able to describe a variety of approaches to to working with challenging students and situations.
5. Preceptors will be able to articulate their philosophy of midwifery care and their philosophy of the clinical education of midwifery students.
6. Preceptors will be able to discuss their needs and abilities to help shape the clinical education of students with the midwifery educational institutions.



WK09 Evaluation and Management of Pelvic Pain Disorders
Wednesday, May 29, 8:30AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Amy Hull, NP, MS


CEUs = 0.35
Rx = 0.35
Fee = $150.00
Student Fee = $75.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Discussion will focus on the causes of chronic pelvic pain (CPP), specifically interstitial cystitis, irritable bowel syndrome, vulvodynia, and the myofascial pain syndrome, levator ani spasm syndrome. Information will be provided regarding the detailed history and physical examination for CPP. Models and video presentation will be utilized to enhance the education and learning process. Anatomy of the pelvic floor will be presented to enhance the attendee's understanding of the pelvic floor.
Objectives:
1. Identify the pathophysiology and etiology of CPP.
2. Identify the sources of CPP.
3. Describe the physical examination for CPP.
4. Describe the treatment options for CPP.



WK10 Complementary Alternative Modalities in Women's Health: New Directions
Wednesday, May 29, 8:30AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Leslie Reed, RN, MSN, HCNS, AHN-BC


CEUs = 0.35
Rx =
Fee = $150.00
Student Fee = $75.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
This half day workshop focuses on Complimentary Alternative Modalities (CAM) and how these therapies can be used to promote and improve health for women and families of all ages. Several types of CAM will be discussed and demonstrations of proper use of some of the techniques will be given. The worshop will focus primarily on primary care and stress management but will also include some treatment information. This workshop will be interactive and participants are encouraged to dress comfortably and come ready to experience varied techniques.
Objectives:
1. At the end of this session, learners will be able to list a minimum of five Complimentary Alternative Modalities that can be used in the promotion of stress management and health care maintenance for women and their families.
2. At the end of this session, learners will be able to demonstrate at least one Complimentary Alternative Modality that can be used to reduce stress.
3. At the end of this session, learners will be able to describe what stress does the body (i.e.- the flight or fight response) and the reason that Complimentary Alternative Modalities are sometimes more effective in reducing stress in comparison to allopathic treatment.
4. At the end of this session, learners will be able to describe health care issues specific to women and their families, including cultural considerations, and how certain Complimentary Alternative Modalities can enhance well being in these populations.



WK12A Refining the Art of Perineal Repair
Wednesday, May 29, 8:30AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Susan Jacoby, CNM, DNP
Joyce Poirer


CEUs = 0.35
Rx = 3.5
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This program offers midwives the opportunity to discuss current recommendations for methods, materials, and techniques used during repair, followed by mentored hands-on skills practice. The workshop covers universal components of suturing: needles and sutures, instruments, instrument handling, and suturing techniques. The focus is on optimal instrument handling and improving technique and efficiency of suturing skills through mentored hands-on experience.
Objectives:
1. Describe the maternal and fetal indications for episiotomy and 3 episiotomy techniques.
2. Identify three ways to learn or improve hand skills for suturing
3. Describe and demonstrate optimal handling of the instruments and needles used when repairing a woman’s tissues following childbirth a) Identify needles and sutures commonly used in perineal and/or obstetric repair b) Identify the three most common surgical knot-tying techniques c) Demonstrate optimal techniques for handling instruments during suturing on a model d) Demonstrate at least one surgical knot tying technique
4. Describe and demonstrate techniques commonly used when evaluating and repairing a woman’s tissues following childbirth a) Identify components of genital evaluation, indications and principles for repair following vaginal birth b) Compare sutures and suturing techniques used for repair of obstetric lacerations or episiotomy c) Demonstrate suturing techniques used for perineal repair using beef tongue models

Wednesday, May 29, 2013 1:00PM - 4:30PM
WK11 Midwives in Medical Education: 2013 Update
Wednesday, May 29, 1:00PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Angela Wilson-Liverman, MSN, CNM
Linda Steinhardt, CNM, FNP, MS
Ami Goldstein, CNM, FNP
Suzanne Seger, CNM
Joanne Bailey, CNM


CEUs = 0.35
Rx =
Fee = $150.00
Student Fee = $75.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
This workshop is aimed at the CNM working in Medical Education, specifically with medical students or residents. Our goal is to share didactic and clinical teaching strategies from several academic centers as well as to investigate new modalities of teaching. Several different academic models will be explored.
Objectives:
1. At the completion of the presentation, attendees will be able to utilize new clinical and didactic teaching strategies when working with medical students or residents.
2. At the completion of the presentation, attendees will be able to utilize the network of CNM's as resources for teaching challenges with medical students or residents.
3. At the completion of the presentation, attendees will understand differences in documentation and billing requirements for midwives working with medical students or residents.



WK12B Refining the Art of Perineal Repair
Wednesday, May 29, 1:00PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Susan Jacoby, CNM, DNP
Joyce Poirer


CEUs = 0.35
Rx = 0.35
Fee = $150.00
Student Fee = $75.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This program offers midwives the opportunity to discuss current recommendations for methods, materials, and techniques used during repair, followed by mentored hands-on skills practice. The workshop covers universal components of suturing: needles and sutures, instruments, instrument handling, and suturing techniques. The focus is on optimal instrument handling and improving technique and efficiency of suturing skills through mentored hands-on experience.
Objectives:
1. "1) Describe the maternal and fetal indications for episiotomy and 3 episiotomy techniques"
2. "2) Identify three ways to learn or improve hand skills for suturing"
3. "3) Describe and demonstrate optimal handling of the instruments and needles used when repairing a woman’s tissues following childbirtha) Identify needles and sutures commonly used in perineal and/or obstetric repairb) Identify the three most common surgical knot-tying techniquesc) Demonstrate optimal techniques for handling instruments during suturing on a modeld) Demonstrate at least one surgical knot tying technique"
4. "4) Describe and demonstrate techniques commonly used when evaluating and repairing a woman’s tissues following childbirtha) Identify components of genital evaluation, indications and principles for repair following vaginal birthb) Compare sutures and suturing techniques used for repair of obstetric lacerations or episiotomyc) Demonstrate suturing techniques used for perineal repair using beef tongue models"

Thursday, May 30, 2013 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Evaluation of the Infertile Couple
Thursday, May 30, 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Presented by:
Lucy Koroma, WHNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Evaluation of the Infertile Couple: An update on basic infertility evaluation, patient counseling, and prescriptive therapy with oral ovulation-inducing agents.
Objectives:
1. Review the initial work-up, diagnosis, and treatment objectives of couples who have been trying to conceive for a year.
2. Compare the effectiveness of using Letrozole vs. Clomiphene Citrate for ovulation induction.



No Laughing Matter; Nitrous Oxide is Making its Way into Births in the US
Thursday, May 30, 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Presented by:
Michelle Collins
Judith Bishop, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Nitrous oxide has resurfaced in recent years in the US as a viable option for labor pain relief. This presentation will describe the history of nitrous oxide, as well as steps nurses and midwives can take to initiate nitrous services at their institutions. The role, function and 'must know' information for the bedside nurse as well as the midiwfe caring for women using nitrous oxide will be discussed.
Objectives:
1. 1. At the completion of the presentation, attendees will be able to describe the history of nitrous oxide use from inception to current day usage.
2. 2. At the completion of the presentation, attendees will be able to discuss the pharmacologic and physiologic properties of nitrous oxide as it relates to use as a labor analgesic, as well as risks and benefits.
3. 3. At the completion of the presentation, attendees will be able to list the role of the midwife in the initiation of and successful implementation of nitrous oxide programs.



State and Federal Policy Update
Thursday, May 30, 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Presented by:
Kathryn Carr
Patrick Cooney, President, The Federal Group, Inc.
Cara Kinzelman, PhD, Health Policy Researcher, Government Relations


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Public Perception
Session Description:
This presentation will inform our membersabout state and federal legislative successesand shortcomings since the 2012 ACNMAnnual Meeting including Health Reform andMaternal Health Legislation. Key legislativeissues pertinent to midwives will be reviewed.Strategies for effecting legislative change atthe local, state, and federal level will bediscussed.
Objectives:
1. The participant will be able to discuss specific state legislation related todirect entry midwives, expansion of CMs, prescriptive authority, and collaborativeagreements/physician supervisory language.
2. The participant will be able to articulate the successes and shortcomingsof Maternal Health Legislation from the 112th Congresses, and be appraised ofACNM's plan of action in the 113th Congress.
3. The participant will be able to navigate the ACNM website to findresources for advocating for specific state and federal issues affecting midwifery.
4. The participant will be able to cite and find on the website, three key documents they can use to promote midwifery.



What do pregnancy complications tell us about future chronic disease risk?
Thursday, May 30, 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Presented by:
Nancy Niemczyk, MSN/CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Midwives know that women who experience gestational diabetes are at greater risk to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. New research demonstrates that women with other pregnancy complications including: hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, preterm birth, and intrauterine growth restriction are at elevated risk of developing future chronic diseases. A pregnancy complicated by severe preeclampsia is a stronger risk factor for future cardiovascular disease than smoking is. This session will review current research on pregnancy complications and future chronic disease risk and appropriate health promotion and screening for women who have experienced pregnancy complications. It will review the American Heart Association's 2011 'Effectiveness-Based Guidelines for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Women.'
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant will be able to identify 3 pregnancy complications that place women at elevated risk of future chronic diseases.
2. At the end of the session the participant will be able to identify which women with gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are at greatest risk to develop chronic diseases.
3. At the end of the session the participant will be able to describe appropriate primary and secondary prevention strategies for women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia.

Thursday, May 30, 2013 8:00AM - 12:00PM
WK06 Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics (ALSO) Provider Course - 3 Day Course
Thursday, May 30, 8:00AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Diana Winslow, RN, BSN


CEUs = 1.3
Rx =
Fee = $500.00
Student Fee = $250.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
The Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics (ALSO) program helps maternity care providers develop the knowledge and skills needed to manage potential emergencies during the perinatal period. With pre-course syllabus reading and minimal lecture time, this course offers an interactive learning environment utilizing pelvic mannequins and other appropriate medical equipment. Evidence-based, hands-on skill/team building is what sets the ALSO Program above other maternity care programs. Participants will obtain five-year ALSO status after successful completion of the written test and megadelivery testing station. Space is limited to 60 participants. Participants must attend all three days.
Objectives:
1. 1. Discuss methods of managing pregnancy and birth urgencies and emergencies, which may help standardize the skills of practicing maternity care providers.
2. 2. Validate content and skill acquisition as demonstrated by successful completion of the course written examination and megadelivery skills testing station.
3. 3. Discuss and demonstrate teamwork and communication tools that improve safety in maternity care.

Thursday, May 30, 2013 8:30AM - 12:00PM
WK07 Birth simulation in midwifery education: Bringing low incidence emergencies to life
Thursday, May 30, 8:30AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Melissa Avery, CNM, PhD
Jane Miller, PhD
Karin Larson, MS, CNM


CEUs = 0.35
Rx =
Fee = $150.00
Student Fee = $75.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
Although promoting and teaching normal birth is central to midwifery education, complications requiring rapid response and effective management do occur. Students need opportunities to learn the process for recognizing and managing specific emergency situations as well as the appropriate hand skills. Postpartum hemorrhage and shoulder dystocia are examples of situations that students study and may not have a chance to manage independently during their education program. In this workshop we will share scenarios developed for these two important complications and describe how simulations using task trainers and live standardized patients were integrated into a midwifery education program. Data from student evaluations of the scenarios will be presented. The workshop will provide participants with an opportunity to experience the actual simulated emergency in a simulation center.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant should be able to describe the benefits of hybrid simulation for midwifery education.
2. At the end of the session the participant should be able to write a complete labor and birth scenario using a template.
3. At the end of the session the participant should be able to define the steps necessary to provide a hybrid simulation to midwifery students and interprofessional learners.
4. At the end of the session the participant should be able to describe the experience of participating in a hybrid simulation experience with task trainers and live standardized patients.



WK13 Labor and Birth in Water: How Birthing Women and Emerging Research Can Change Midwifery Practice
Thursday, May 30, 8:30AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Jenna Shaw-Battista, BA, MS, PhD, NP, CNM
Shaunette Meyer, MA, MSN, CNM
Sharon Demeter, MS, MS, CNM
Sage Bearman, MA, RN


CEUs = 0.35
Rx =
Fee = $150.00
Student Fee = $75.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Despite mounting data on the benefits and safety of warm water immersion during labor and birth, utilization rates in the United States (US) lag far behind those reported internationally. Relatively few US nurse-midwives offer the option of waterbirth, even when knowledgeable and/or supportive of the intrapartum care practice. This workshop will examine these discrepancies along with recent research on the use and outcomes of intrapartum hydrotherapy. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for labor and birth in water will be reviewed with examples from several US nurse-midwifery practices. We will outline key steps in beginning and sustaining the option of waterbirth, including interprofessional communication, stakeholder engagement, and practical strategies for overcoming barriers to implementation. Experienced waterbirth providers will describe “tricks of the trade” and review quality assessment and improvement activities to be considered. Presenters will also discuss findings from a new qualitative study of women’s prenatal decision-making and postpartum satisfaction with waterbirth, with implications for marketing the practice and the midwifery model of care. A detailed resource list and sample clinical guidelines will be distributed.
Objectives:
1. Attendees will be able to discuss the state of the science on labor and birth in water, and identify the possible and probable impacts of immersion hydrotherapy on maternal and neonatal outcomes of childbirth. Risks and benefits related to waterbirth, as well as gaps in the current body of research, will be highlighted.
2. Attendees will be able to list the indications and contraindications for labor and/or birth in water, and discuss the underlying physiologic rationale(s) arising from relevant research. Further, attendees will be able to differentiate indications and contraindications for warm water immersion that vary among the first, second, and third stages of labor.
3. Attendees will be able to synthesize and apply information presented in this workshop to their own clinical practice through the initiation and/or maintenance of a waterbirth program. Information will include interprofessional communication, clinical guideline development and revision, equipment considerations, and essential quality assessment and improvement activities.
4. Attendees will be able to identify barriers and discuss strategies for overcoming obstacles to the provision of waterbirth common among midwifery practice settings.



WK14 Physiology and Management of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding and Endometrial Biopsy
Thursday, May 30, 8:30AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Angela Deneris


CEUs = 0.35
Rx = 0.35
Fee = $150.00
Student Fee = $75.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Abnormal and dysfunctional uterine bleeding (AUB and DUB) and endometrial cancer are significant problems in GYN practice. It is important that midwives providing care for women are knowledgeable in the evaluation, differential diagnoses and treatment modalities of AUB and DUB including indications, contraindications and technique for endometrial sampling, when to order ultrasound to aid in diagnosis and when to refer women for possible surgical intervention. Case studies from the presenter's practice will be utilized to facilitate the ability of the participants to apply the information to their clinical practice. The session will include simulated practice of endometrial biopsy with two common devises.
Objectives:
1. Define dysfunctional and abnormal uterine bleeding categories from the normal pattern of uterine bleeding in women.
2. Differentiate between normal physiologic and pathologic abnormal and dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Review risk factors for endometrial cancer.
3. Discuss indications and contraindications for endometrial biopsy.
4. Discuss potential results from the endometrial biopsy and treatment options.
5. Perform a simulated endometrial biopsy.
6. Review case studies and management from the presenter’s practice.



WK15 Ethical Dilemmas in Midwifery: Coping with Disagreement , Where is the middle ground?
Thursday, May 30, 8:30AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Mary Kaye Collins, CNM, JD, FACNM
Joyce Thompson, DrPH, RN, CNM, FAAN, FACNM
Kathleen Powderly, CNM, PhD


CEUs = 0.35
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
As in all health care, midwifery practice is subject to the conflicts that arise out of the complex framework that is the patient-provider relationship in modern American society. A dilemma is a creature of conflict where multiple solutions are often equally unappealing. Ethical dilemmas in midwifery practice may develop when there is conflict between what the midwife believes is her moral responsibility and the decisions made by clients and other healthcare providers. This workshop will provide a framework for dealing with ethical dilemmas and discussion on how to live with decisions contrary to our beliefs.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the workshop, the participant will be able to list resources available to assist in ethical decision-making.
2. At the end of the workshop, the participantwill be able to identify personal and organizational values that influence ethical decision-making.
3. At the end of the workshop, the participant will be able to list three strategies for living with ethical decisions with which they disagree.



WK16 Getting the Job YOU want: A workshop for students and new graduates
Thursday, May 30, 8:30AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Mavis Schorn, PhD/CNM
Sharon Holley, DNP, CNM
julia phillippi
Tonia Moore-Davis, CNM


CEUs = 0.35
Rx =
Fee = $150.00
Student Fee = $75.00
Session Description:
This workshop is designed to assist the midwifery student and/or new midwifery graduate preparing for their first job search. The focus will be on how to discern what job is the best “fit” and how to stand out among the competition for the desired position.
Objectives:
1. Identify 3 personal priorities associated with midwifery job satisfaction.
2. Name 3 factors important to employers when evaluating a candidate for a midwifery position.
3. Identify common components of an employment agreement.
4. Demonstrate at least 3 interview techniques that can be implemented with any interview.



WK17 Legislative Action in 2013: Nuts and Bolts
Thursday, May 30, 8:30AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Kathryn Carr
Patrick Cooney, President, The Federal Group, Inc.
Cara Kinzelman, PhD, Health Policy Researcher, Government Relations
Laura Jenson, CNN, MPH, MS, CPH


CEUs = 0.35
Rx =
Fee = $25.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Public Perception
Session Description:
This presentation will be an in-depth review and discussion of how midwives caninfluence and generate health policy. Effective techniques to bring policy change at the local, state and federal levels will be reviewed. Legislative successes andshortcomings pertinent to women's health since the 2012 ACNM Annual Meetingincluding Health Reform and Maternal Health Legislation will be reviewed anddiscussed. Breakout groups will provide an opportunity for participants to worktogether in smaller groups to develop strategies for addressing specific policy and legislative issues.
Objectives:
1. The participant will be able to state three ways to influence andgenerate health policy.
2. The participant will be able to state three techniques used to influencepolicy at the local, state, and federal levels.
3. The participant will be able to briefly describe three important issues relative to midwifery policy and legislative issues at a state and federal level.
4. The participant will participate in a smaller group and work with others to develop several strategies for addressing these policy and legislative issues.



WK18 Electronic Fetal Monitoring
Thursday, May 30, 8:30AM - 12:00PM
Presented by:
Susan Drummond, MSN RN C-EFM
Angie Long , CNM


CEUs = 0.35
Rx =
Fee = $150.00
Student Fee = $75.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This workshop will discuss developing a certification program in EFM, review of current nomenclature, case presentations, and liability issues in obstetrics.
Objectives:
1. Describe the benefits and implementation of a certification program in Electronic Fetal Monitoring.
2. Identify current nomenclature used in the documentation and communication of Electronic Fetal Monitoring tracings.
3. Describe liability issues that are common to the practice of obstetrics.
4. Describe management of Electronic Fetal Monitoring tracings as presented in selected case studies.

Thursday, May 30, 2013 9:00AM - 10:00AM
Female Sexual Dysfunction: Evaluation, Diagnosis and Coding
Thursday, May 30, 9:00AM - 10:00AM
Presented by:
Brooke Faught, MSN, WHNP-BC, IF


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD) is often a missed area of training for most medical professionals despite the fact that nearly half of all women report sexual complaints. This presentation will provide a comprehensive overview of the evaluation, diagnosis and billing/coding of FSD for the non-sexual health provider. This is intended for midwives who often encounter patients reporting sexual concerns but do not have access to a local sexual medicine practitioner.
Objectives:
1. Learn appropriate and effective communication styles to address sexual complaints
2. Understand the different diagnostic categories of FSD
3. Learn billing and coding strategies to optimize reimbursement



Midwifery Educators Roundtable
Thursday, May 30, 9:00AM - 10:00AM
Presented by:
Dawn Durain, CNM, MPH
Tanya Tanner, PhD, MBA, RN, CNM
Judy Lazarus, MSN, CNM, ARNP
Carrie Klima, CNM, PhD
Janet Lewis, CNM, MSN, MA
Ellen Brodrick, CNM, ANP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
Educators of Student Midwives have increasingly expressed their desire for a forum in which to discuss issues pertinent to challenges faced in our education programs. This is our chance to come together for information sharing, professional support and faculty development. Join us for a session devoted to your concerns!
Objectives:
1. 1. Increased knowledge of successful teaching strategies currently being implemented in midwifery education.
2. 2. Increased awareness of new and evolving curriculum components and faculty innovations in midwifery education.
3. 3. Identification of gaps and needs in the support of clinical and classroom faculty in midwifery education programs.



Midwives Promoting Physiologic Spontaneous Labor: Let the Evidence Speak
Thursday, May 30, 9:00AM - 10:00AM
Presented by:
Catherine Ruhl, MS, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The labor induction rate was 22.6% for the U.S. in 2006 up from 9.5% in 1990. An examination of the data shows that one half to 2/3 of inductions are elective. Labor induction increases risks for both the mother and newborn including increased use of technology for labor and birth, increased risk of cesarean birth and its associated short and long term complications, and breastfeeding difficulties. This presentation will review trends in spontaneous and induced labor and outline the benefits of spontaneous labor for the woman, her newborn, the maternity care team and the healthcare system. The effect of education for women about spontaneous labor will be described and two consumer education campaigns will be compared and contrasted. Attendees will conclude by brainstorming barriers and facilitators of spontaneous labor.
Objectives:
1. Describe the benefits of spontaneous labor for women, newborns, members of the maternity care team, and healthcare systems.
2. Critique education for women about the benefits of avoiding elective induction of labor and going at least the full 40 weeks of pregnancy.
3. Identify barriers and facilitators of spontaneous labor in the current maternity care culture



Why Health IT Matters: Your Paycheck is At Stake
Thursday, May 30, 9:00AM - 10:00AM
Presented by:
Catherine Ivory, PhD, RN-BC, RNC-OB


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Session Description:
In an effort to support evidence-based maternity care, quantifying the practice and outcomes of nurse-midwifery care is essential. This presentation will focus on what meaningful use of healthcare IT means to nurse-midwifery practice and discuss both the benefits and challenges of collecting, collating, and quantifying midwifery-related data. Data collection and benchmarking work currently underway by other perinatal stakeholder groups will also be described.
Objectives:
1. List pertinent elements of meaningful use (MU)
2. Discuss challenges to meeting MU for Perinatal specialties
3. Describe current collaborative perinatal quality and benchmarking initiatives
4. Discuss the potential impact of Health IT to midwifery practice and research

Thursday, May 30, 2013 9:00AM - 1:30PM
WK19 ACNM 1/2 Day Exam Prep Case Studies Course (Day 2)
Thursday, May 30, 9:00AM - 1:30PM
Presented by:
Melissa Willmarth, DNP, CNM, APRN
Alisha Morgan, MSN, CNM
Cara Busenhart, PhD(c), MSN, CNM
Nicole Rouhana, PhD, CNM, FNP-BC
Nicole Lassiter, CNM, MSN, WHNP-BC
Julie Paul, DNP, CNM
Susan Yount, PhD, CNM, WHNP-BC


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $150.00
Student Fee = $75.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
This two day workshop will provide students and new graduates an opportunity for exam preparation. Day one will focus on the content covered by the AMCB certification exam. Experts in each topic will give students an overview of the content with an opportunity to begin formulating a plan of study. Day two will explore interactive case studies and practice questions on the main topical areas for the AMCB midwifery examination. Students can register for one or both days. At the conclusion of the sessions, students should will have completed an individualized plan for continuing review.
Objectives:
1. Participants will understand all aspects of the AMCB national certification exam including the exam blueprint, scoring and how to apply apply.
2. Participants will complete content review as well as practice tests through the use of integrative case studies and exam questions.
3. Participants will be able to verbalize rationales for appropriate questions.
4. Participants will develop a comprehensive plan for additional board review.

Thursday, May 30, 2013 10:30AM - 11:30AM
Department of Global Health (DGH) Research Forum I
Thursday, May 30, 10:30AM - 11:30AM
Presented by:
Judith Fullerton , CNM, PhD, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
Presented in this forum: 1. Determinants of Teamwork among Community Maternal and Newborn Health Workers in Rural Ethiopia Michelle Dynes PhD, MPH, CNM ; Rob Stephenson, PhD; Craig Hadley, PhD; Lynn Sibley, PhD, CNM, FACNM, FAAN 2. Local midwives finish last: Findings from a demographic and work environment survey among auxiliary midwives in Mali Nicole E. Warren, CNM, PhD, MPH; Seydou Doumbia, MD; Peter E. Winch, MD 3. Validation of the Optimality Index-US for use in Turkey to Assess Maternity Care Clgdem Yucel, PhD "



New Cervical Cancer Screening Guidelines
Thursday, May 30, 10:30AM - 11:30AM
Presented by:
Howard Jones, MD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Over the past few years new technologies and improved understanding of the natural history of the development of cervical cancer have resulted in changes in the recommended guidelines for cervical cancer screening. Cervical cancer screening with cytology should start at age 21 regardless of sexual history. From age 21 to age 29 Pap screening should be done every 3 years. At age 30, co-testing with Pap plus HPV testing should be done every 5 years until age 65 or until hysterectomy with removal of the cervix. All these screening guidelines apply to women with consistently negative screening tests.
Objectives:
1. Discuss the age and reasons to initiate Pap test screening for cervical cancer.
2. Explain the advantages of co-testing with Pap and HPV testing.
3. Describe the recommended intervals between Pap screening at different ages



The Special Needs of the Late Preterm Infant
Thursday, May 30, 10:30AM - 11:30AM
Presented by:
Patricia Scott, DNP, APN, NNP-BC, C-NPT


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The rate of premature birth continues to steadily increase in the United States. The majority of these births are in the late preterm infant, defined as a gestational age between 34 and 36 completed weeks. This population of babies has their own unique problems which include hypothermia, respiratory distress, hypoglycemia, feeding problems and hyperbilirubinemia. The morbidity for this population is not known, but their mortality rate is three times that of a term infant. This presentation will focus on the assessment and treatment of the special needs of this population.
Objectives:
1. At the end of this session, the participant will be able to discuss the definition and incidence of late preterm birth.
2. At the end of this session, the participant will be able to discuss the incidence, risks for, and etiology of respiratory distress in this population.
3. At the end of this session, the participant will be able to describe the physiology, assessment, and management of hyperbilirubinemia and why the late preterm infant is at increased risk.
4. At the end of this session, the participant will be able to identify the risk factors for and signs of hypothermia.
5. At the end of this session, the participant will be able to discuss why this population is at increased risk for hypoglycemia and feeding problems.

Thursday, May 30, 2013 12:30PM - 1:30PM
“Managing Menopause Symptoms: An Update on Treatment Options
Thursday, May 30, 12:30PM - 1:30PM
Presented by:
Laurie Tompkins, WHNP, MSN- BC


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
In 2002 the release of findings from Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) dramatically changed how practitioners think about and prescribe Hormone Therapy (HT).Numerous practitioners subsequently advised patients to avoid Hormone Therapy (HT). As new information related to hormone therapy and menopause management becomes available we are compelled to continually revisit the literature and guide patients through the maze of data, facilitating well informed decisions about their health and future. Specific recommendations about products, prescribing information for each will be discussed.
Objectives:
1. "• Describe the appropriate terminology for hormone therapy including ET, EPT, HT and bioidentical hormones "
2. " • Identify the relevant discussion points to provide balanced information to women regarding risks and benefits of hormone therapy (HT) in relation to disease prevention, symptom control and quality of life measures."
3. " • Critically evaluate the various delivery methods for HT and the side effects, benefits and risk associated with each. "
4. Discuss the appropriate dose, delivery method and length of use for hormone therapy with the individual woman.
5. Describe nonhormonal therapeutic options for management of menopausal symptoms



Miscarriage management in the outpatient setting
Thursday, May 30, 12:30PM - 1:30PM
Presented by:
Amy Levi, CNM, WHNP-BC, PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Approximately 30% of pregnancies end in miscarriage after the woman has identified herself as pregnant. Midwives are frequently the first provider that a woman sees for the diagnosis and treatment of a miscarriage. This session will discuss a variety of treatment modalities for assisting women who have experienced a miscarriage, including vacuum aspiration.
Objectives:
1. 1. At the end of this session, the participation should be able to identify and characterize pregnancy loss in the first, second, and third trimester by a variety of diagnostic criteria.
2. 2. At the end of this session, the participation should be able to identify all of the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic agents that assist with resolution of a miscarriage.
3. 3. At the end of this session, the participation should be able to describe the process of intrauterine evacuation with a vacuum aspiration device for resolution of a miscarriage.
4. 4. At the end of this session, the participation should be able to identify the scope of practice for midwives in the management of miscarriage.



Six is the new Four: Reexamining Friedman's Curve
Thursday, May 30, 12:30PM - 1:30PM
Presented by:
Angela Wilson-Liverman, MSN, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This presentation will examine recent data regarding the natural course of labor. Recent evidence suggests that Friedman's Curve is outdated and that the Active Phase of labor begins at 6cm dilation. There is also evidence that we are too quick to diagnose labor arrest prior to 6cm and too slow to diagnose it after 6cm.
Objectives:
1. At the completion of the presentation, attendees will have an understanding of new data on average labor progress prior to 6cm dilation.
2. At the completion of the presentation, attendees will have a revised understanding of expected progress in the 2nd stage of labor.
3. At the completion of the presentation, attendees will have a new, updated and evidence based understanding of the natural course of labor.

Thursday, May 30, 2013 12:30PM - 2:00PM
Collaborations and Innovations in Global Health
Thursday, May 30, 12:30PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Maria Freytsis, CNM, MPH
Phyllis Clark, CNM, MPH
Jodi Lori, PhD, CNM, FACNM, FAAN
Cindy Urbanc, CNM,MSN,MPH
Michelle Munro, MS, CNM, FNP-BC


CEUs = 0.15
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
In this session, you will hear three presenters discuss their collaboration and innovation in global health: 1) Annie Clark will present work from Uganda on “Improving Newborn Care Using the Improvement Collaborative Approach” 2) Maria Freytsis & Cindy Urbanc will discuss “Maternal Concept Lab: Strengthening the Global Midwifery Workforce Through mHealth Innovation” and 3) Michelle Munro will present work from Liberia on “Bridging the Gap: Maternity Waiting Homes as a Link to Integrating Community Services”
Objectives:
1. By the end of the session the participant will be able to cite the three primary causes of neonatal death both globally and in Uganda and describe the collaborative approach to quality improvement to improve maternal/newborn health care.
2. By the end of the session the participant will have an understanding of the way in which mobile tools can be used as job aids to help with midwifery task shifting and for education and decision support for midwives in remote and resource-poor settings.
3. By the end of the session the participant will be able to identify how maternity waiting homes can integrate communities and health providers from remote and rural locations in low resource settings to increase to access to skilled facilities for safe maternal and neonatal care.

Thursday, May 30, 2013 5:45PM - 5:45PM
Division of Research (DOR) Research Forum I
Thursday, May 30, 5:45PM - 5:45PM
Presented by:
Carrie Klima, CNM, PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
Presented in this forum: 1. Life Course Patterns and Risky Health Behaviors in Incarcerated Women Nena Harris, PhD, FNP-BC, CNM; Margarete Sandelowski, PhD, RN, FAAN; 2. Group Prenatal Care: Model Fidelity and Outcomes Gina Novick, PhD, CNM; Allecia E. Reid, PhD; Jeannette R.Ickovics. PhD 3. Identification of Sensitive Predictors of Levator Ani Tear during First Complex Vaginal Delivery Lisa Kane Low CNM, PhD, FACNM; Ruth Zielinksi, CNM, PhD; Janis Miller, PhD, RN, ANP; Catherine Brandon, MD

Thursday, May 30, 2013 5:45PM - 6:45PM
Diagnosis and Management of Thyroid Dysfunction in Pregnancy
Thursday, May 30, 5:45PM - 6:45PM
Presented by:
Tanya Tanner, PhD, MBA, RN, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This presentation discusses screening for, diagnosing, and managing thyroid disorders in pregnancy. Normal and abnormal thyroid function is reviewed. Routine screening for thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy and content of current clinical guidelines are discussed.
Objectives:
1. Explain normal thyroid function and how it is affected by pregnancy.
2. Compare current clinical guidelines for thyroid screening in pregnancy.
3. Explain subclinical thyroid disorders encountered during pregnancy and their recommended pharmacologic and complimentary and alternative medicine treatments.
4. Explain common clinical thyroid disorders encountered during pregnancy and their recommended pharmacologic and complimentary and alternative medicine treatments.



Expanding Primary Care Opportunities for Midwifery Students: Simulation for Clinical Reasoning
Thursday, May 30, 5:45PM - 6:45PM
Presented by:
Julia Phillippi, PhD, CNM
Amy Bull, PhD, FNP-BC
Sharon Holley, DNP, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
The ACNM Core Competencies require educational programs to prepare students to be competent primary care providers. However, many experienced midwifery faculty lack primary care experience. With a national shortage of nursing faculty, it is more important than ever to maximize available resources without overtaxing faculty workloads. Our course revision allowed nurse-midwifery faculty to lead a primary care clinical conference, while utilizing Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) faculty as ‘primary care experts’. We revamped the clinical conference time to simulate clinical visits to guide the students through the clinical reasoning process. Low-fidelity simulation allowed students time to take a systematic approach to patient assessment, planning, and charting. FNP ‘experts’ were used to critique student chart notes prior to grading. This collaborative approach to primary care clinical conference was well received by students, faculty, and preceptors and was fast and inexpensive to implement.
Objectives:
1. Participants will state the ACNM Core Competencies related to primary care.
2. Participants will identify the positive and negative attributes of simulation.
3. Participants will state how low-fidelity clinical simulation can be used in a clinical conference setting.
4. Participants will be able to state 2 resources for expert content for primary care clinical conferences.



International Maternal Health 101: The Basics of Maternal Mortality
Thursday, May 30, 5:45PM - 6:45PM
Presented by:
Diana Fitzgerald
Elizabeth Goldblatt, Program Coodinator
Kristen Harker


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
Maternal Mortality is a multi-factorial issue that requires interventions on multiple fronts to solve the problem.It is a human rights issue, a socioeconomic issue, an economic and environmental issue. This presentation will begin to help with the understanding of terms related to maternal mortality including discussion of the Millennium Development Goals and interventions globally. This is an essential starting point in order to understand more deeply the roots and plans for the future.
Objectives:
1. Upon completion of this presentation, the learner will understand the definitions, causes/ contributing factors, and geographic disparities surrounding maternal mortality.
2. Upon completion of this presentation, the learner will be able to discuss the Millennium Development Goals dedicated to improving maternal mortality, the progress made, and the progress needed.
3. Upon completion of this presentation, the learner will be able to describe current interventions that are being used to decrease Maternal Mortality.



Pertussis:Resurgence, Prevention, and Role of the Womens Health Provider
Thursday, May 30, 5:45PM - 6:45PM
Presented by:
Kimberly Fortner, MD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Since late 2011, a substantial rise in pertussis cases has been reported with the state of Washington declaring a pertussis epidemic Spring 2012. Due to waning immunity and inadequate vaccination, a nearly 1,300% increase in pertussis cases has been reported, with the infectious burden falling to infants less than 6 months of age. Discussion regarding the reasons and impact of this epidemic will be reviewed, as well as prevention strategies and current women's health vaccination guidelines.
Objectives:
1. At the conclusion of the session, the participant will understand epidemiology of pertussis and its recent resurgence in the United States.
2. At the conclusion of the session, the participant will know how to diagnose and treat active pertussis infection in a womens health population.
3. At the conclusion of the session, the participant will understand how to prevent pertussis infection among women of child bearing age, including current CDC Guidelines.
4. At the conclusion of the session, the participant will be aware of vaccination in womens health, as well as areas of scientific research and state resources.

Thursday, May 30, 2013 7:00PM - 8:00PM
Ankyloglossia: Tongue-tie Evaluation, Management and Treatment
Thursday, May 30, 7:00PM - 8:00PM
Presented by:
Ami Goldstein, CNM, FNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Tongue-tie is a condition often diagnosed in the newborn. Evaluation can be subjective but there are appropriate tools to determine degree of ankyloglossia. Treatment of this condition with frenotomy is within the midwifery scope of practice. It is important for the midwife to be able to identify ankylossia which may be managed versus a more complicated version which should be referred.
Objectives:
1. Identify ankyloglossia using a standardized tool and describe if it is anterior or posterior.
2. Name the benefits of frenotomy and risks.
3. Describe frenotomy process. Name tools required, timing and procedure.
4. Describe a frenotomy protocol, documentation and billing and coding.
5. Name reasons for referral for frenotomy.



Making Choices in Your Early Years to Create a Long Midwifery Career!
Thursday, May 30, 7:00PM - 8:00PM
Presented by:
Jerrilyn (Jerri) Hobdy, MS, EdM, CNM, FACNM
Frances (Francie) Likis, DrPH, NP, CNM, FACNM
Heather Bradford, MSN, CNM, ARNP, FACNM
Lisa Kane Low, PhD, RN, CNM, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Business
Session Description:
The purpose of this session is to have a panel of our newer/younger ACNM Fellows discuss their career choices and their experiences with trying to find balance in their professional and personal lives. The panel will bring stories from their journeys in midwifery - the good, the bad and the ugly - along with suggestions for how to plan early in your career to stay alive in midwifery throughout the years! This session has been developed by the FACNM Mentoring Task Force in an effort to have a visible and active role in mentoring midwives.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the presentation, attendees will be able to identify the areas of expertise of the Fellows for future resources.
2. At the end of the presentation, the attendees will be able to identify the midwifery challenges and successes from past experiences to apply to current and future issues and concerns.
3. At the end of the presentation, the attendees will be able to identify the lessons learned from those who have gone before.



Midwifery in 18th Century America: A Guided Tour
Thursday, May 30, 7:00PM - 8:00PM
Presented by:
Jodi Daynard


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Public Reception
Session Description:
What was it like to be a midwife in 18th century America? Come learn all about early midwifery’s art and science. Author Jodi Daynard will lead an interactive tour of salves, oils, poultices, plaisters, and herbal medicine. You will get to see (and maybe even taste) the plants that would have been used for a variety of ailments, as well as view photos of early instruments and tools. Ms. Daynard will speak about how an exemplary midwife of the 18th century would have practiced—her values, techniques, medical assumptions, and fears—and her impressive array of skills. As Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, author of A Midwife’s Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary 1785 - 1812, wrote, the early midwife was “simultaneously a midwife, nurse, physician, mortician, pharmacist, and attentive wife.” Ms. Daynard will also provide statistics on neonatal and maternal complications and deaths at the time, some of which might surprise you. The lecture will close with Ms. Daynard reading a scene or two from her new novel The Midwife’s Revolt, which Publishers Weekly has called “A surprising, unexpected, and decidedly different take on the Revolutionary War.” A book signing for The Midwife's Revolt will be held in the bookstore on Friday at 1:00PM.



Nurse-Midwifery Practice and Nurse Family Partnership
Thursday, May 30, 7:00PM - 8:00PM
Presented by:
Angela Chiodo, CNM, MS
Mary Lewis, MSN, CNM


CEUs = 0
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This presentation describes a long standing midwifery practice working with a higher risk population, reflected by the high infant mortality & morbidity statistics. The practice has joined the Nurse Family Partnership program, which combines prenatal care and home visits, early interventions in order to reduce these poor outcomes. Nursing and midwifery had similar beginnings: in the home.
Objectives:
1. At the end of this session, the participants should be able to demonstrate knowledge of a new, integrated, unique model of nursing and midwifery in a long standing practice in Detroit.
2. At the end of the session, participants should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the relationship between early prenatal care and home visits as part of our heritage in the reduction of infant morbidity and mortality in a high risk population.
3. At the end of the session, participants should be able to have a better understanding of the variables affecting infant morbidity and mortality and some proven and proposed solutions.
4. At the end of this session, the participants will have an understanding of the Nurse Family Partnership Program and its connection to Midwifery practice and anticipated outcomes.

Friday, May 31, 2013 8:00AM - 9:00AM
Contraceptive Update: 2013
Friday, May 31, 8:00AM - 9:00AM
Presented by:
Anne Moore, DNP, APRN


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This session will explore existing contraceptive options as well as those in development. Safety, efficacy, and side effect issues concerning each method will be reviewed
Objectives:
1. Discuss the problem of unintended pregnancy in the US
2. List the current types of contraception available in the US
3. Discuss the mechanism of action of various types of contraception
4. Identify appropriate candidates for different contraceptive options
5. Discuss management strategies to improve patient adherence
6. Discuss side effect management



Gestational Diabetes: Case studies and controversies in Perinatal Care
Friday, May 31, 8:00AM - 9:00AM
Presented by:
Etoi Garrison, MD; PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The incidence of gestational diabetes is increasing across the U.S. As our population of women affected with this condition increases, it has also become increasingly important to understand the risks and benefits associated with the various screening options that are currently available. Once the diagnosis is made, how do you counsel the patient about the magnitude of risk associated with this disorder for herself and for her baby?
Objectives:
1. Participants will gain knowledge about gestational diabetes and the increase of incidence in the U.S.
2. Participants will be acquainted with the various screening options that are currently available and the risks and benefits associated with each.
3. Participants will gain knowledge and process of the counseling each patient should receive to understand the risks to the mother and child.



New developments in postpartum hemorrhage prevention and management: Changing Midwifery Practice -- or Not?
Friday, May 31, 8:00AM - 9:00AM
Presented by:
Mary Ellen Stanton, CNM, MSN
Lynn Freedman


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
The field of maternal health still struggles to save the lives of women who die from PPH but the focus has been on scaling up the tried and true evidence –based interventions. But a number of new developments in this area may change the world in which we work. Misoprostol is now included for community-based distribution in WHO's updated PPH prevention and treatment guidelines 2012; issues of potency for oxytocin and misoprostol could have important implications for PPH prevention and women giving birth; the WHO non-inferiority trial on AMTSL vs simplified AMTSL has been completed and a number of new initiatives are starting up. What do these developments mean for global and country programs that do the practical work of caring for mothers and newborns and saving lives? Join us to learn about these developments that will likely initiate some significant changes in practice and programs.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant should be able to identify two updates on the uterotonic medicines, misoprostol and oxytocin that could potentially affect millions of women globally who are delivered by midwives or other maternity care providers
2. At the end of the session the participant should be able to state the results of the recent WHO non-inferiority trial on AMTSL vs simplified AMTSL.
3. At the end of the session the participant should be able to identify what do these developments mean for global and country programs that do the practical work of caring for mothers and newborns and saving lives?



Oxytocin: Pharmacology to Practice and Protocols
Friday, May 31, 8:00AM - 9:00AM
Presented by:
Tekoa King , CNM, MPH


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This presentation reviews the physiology of oxytocin and oxytocin receptors, pharmacokinetics of oxytocin and evidence-based protocols for use of oxytocin for induction of labor and augmentation of labor. A brief review of postpartum use will also be presented. Participants will receive a bibliography and list of resources
Objectives:
1. Understand the physiologic function of oxytocin.
2. Understand the pharmacokinetics of oxytocin.
3. Apply this knowledge to use of oxytocin in clinical practice for induction of labor.
4. Implement evidence-based protocols for oxytocin use.
5. Utilize knowledge of oxytocin kinetics for treating postpartum hemorrahge.



Shoulder dystocia simulations: Why is fidelity important and how can it be enhanced
Friday, May 31, 8:00AM - 9:00AM
Presented by:
Tia Andrighetti, DNP, CNM
Nora Webster, DNP, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical, Education
Session Description:
Clinical experiences vary in opportunities to manage critical situations; simulation is valuable in allowing practice in management of complications that are rarely encountered. Simulation also allows for making mistakes in a safe environment, without risk of harm. By mimicking a real life scenario, the stress and teamwork elements of managing a complication can be simulated, thus allowing realistic practice prior to a real life high stakes situation. By adding a standardized patient, the psychosocial elements of a clinical scenario are also incorporated, requiring the participant to respond to the added layer of communicating with the client. Safety is a major national focus in health care, especially since the landmark Institute of Medicine report noting medical errors causing patient deaths, the delay between new evidence and its implementation into practice, and the lag in education to meet the increasing acuity and care needs of today’s clients. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations conducted an analysis of untoward obstetric events, and found poor communication and lack of teamwork in those situations, recommending team training and clinical simulations for obstetric emergencies. The birth process is complex and many situations require emergent CNM management. It is essential to practice these situations in a safe learning environment without the possibility of client harm. There are currently no high fidelity birthing simulators that adequately portray a birthing woman. One university’s experience with creating high fidelity simulations will be discussed. Methods to enhance fidelity without a large budget, instead using creativity, will be described. Summary: This session will discuss how to implement high fidelity obstetric simulations using standardized patients and a simulator. By providing these fully immersive experiential educational opportunities we have an opportunity to increase knowledge and safety in management of complications. Come experience firsthand what fidelity can do to enhance the experience!
Objectives:
1. Develop a simulation/drill agenda to meet educational/hospital guidelines.
2. Identify needed elements to facilitate high fidelity obstetric simulations.
3. Identify how to implement highly effective, high fidelity, hybrid obstetric simulations with a limited budget and moderate amount of creativity.
4. Experience firsthand a high fidelity simulation with a standardized patient and simulator.

Friday, May 31, 2013 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Addressing Musculoskeletal Complaints in Primary Care
Friday, May 31, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Courtney Young, DNP, MPH, FNP-BC


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This presentation serves as a review of the musculoskeletal system and common complaints typically addressed in the primary care setting by the advanced practice nurse. Content includes a review of assessment techniques as well as evidence-based management of chronic and acute conditions of the musculoskeletal system. Pharmacological therapy, non-pharmacological therapy, and patient education information will be addressed as it pertains to primary care. The presentation will conclude with case studies for attendees to use to practice and reflect on information presented.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, the participant will be more knowledgeable of the most up-to-date evidence-based techniques or findings related to common musculoskeletal complaints.
2. At the end of the session, the participant should be able to should more accurately generate differential diagnoses related to the common diagnoses of the musculoskeletal system.
3. At the end of the session, the participant should be able to develop an appropriate and evidence-based treatment plan for a common diagnosis of the musculoskeletal system.
4. At the end of the session, the participant should be able to differentiate between treatment plans for pregnant and non-pregnant patients.



Caring for Women Affected by Female Genital Cutting
Friday, May 31, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Nicole Warren, PhD, MPH, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The number of African immigrants to the US doubled between 2000 and 2010 and continues to rise. Since many African women are affected by female genital cutting (FGC), midwives in the US must be prepared to meet this community’s unique reproductive health needs. This session will provide a brief overview of FGC and present the latest evidence about obstetric outcomes. We juxtapose these data with stories from affected women and their providers. Based on this evidence, we will present practical practice strategies to minimize poor outcomes and maximize client and midwife satisfaction. Ethical and legal implications of your care, including defibublation and refibulation (the opening and re-approximating a previous FGC scar), will be highlighted.
Objectives:
1. Attendees will be familiar with FGC's history, FGC types, rationale for the practice, and associated obstetric outcomes.
2. Attendees will be able to articulate concerns of both FGC-affected women and their providers in childbearing settings in countries of resettlement.
3. Attendees will be able to identify strategies to screen affected women and incorporate FGC-related elements into a routine history and physical.
4. Attendees will be able to identify strategies to minimize risks of adverse obstetric outcomes that may be related to clients' FGC and/or refugee and immigrant status.
5. Attendees will recognize the ethical and legal implications of their clinical role in ante, intra, and postpartum care, including defibulation and refibulation, of FGC-affected women.



Ethics and Ethical Issues in Midwifery: From Care Ethics to Virtue Ethics
Friday, May 31, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Frank Boehm, MD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Medical ethics is the study of standards of conduct and moral judgment and is a method of decision making as well as a code of behavior. Medical ethics involves four basic foundational principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice as well as the guiding principles of professionalism. Medical ethics is a way for providers to address all of the many aspects of patient care and should be a part of each and every patient encounter.
Objectives:
1. 1) To understand the basic ethical principles involved in the care of patients
2. 2) To understand the importance of medical professionalism.
3. 3) To understand how these principles of ethics and professionalism influence management of obstetric controversies.



Pelvic organ prolapse and Urinary Incontinence: How to help your patient in 15 minutes or less.
Friday, May 31, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Suzanne Csorna, MSN, APN


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence (UI) are very common problems in women who are of child-bearing age and in women who are not of child-bearing age. Pelvic floor dysfunction is a taboo topic for women suffering from these disorders and they often suffer in silence. Similarly health care providers are wary about bringing up the topic especially given this day in age as a result of the vaginal mesh complications that have permeated our newspapers and televisions. These disorders can often be treated with effective, conservative treatments that significantly improve a woman's quality of life. This presentation will focus on the assessment of POP and UI as well as the conservative treatment of these disorders; More invasive treatment options will also be reviewed.
Objectives:
1. Describe the signs and symptoms, clinical assessment and conservative treatment of pelvic organ prolapse.
2. Describe the signs and symptoms, clinical assessment and conservative treatment of urinary incontinence.
3. Describe more invasive treatment of both pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence.



Ready or Not, Here We Come!: Ensuring Seamless Transitions from Home or Birth Center to Hospital
Friday, May 31, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Mairi Rothman, CNM, MSN


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
Home and birth center midwives must have clinical practice guidelines that include plans for transfer of care. But what about providers on the receiving end of those transfers? This session offers a look at best practices for out-of-hospital midwives, their clients, and those on the receiving end of transfers. We will include templates for transport forms and CPGs for receiving providers, as well as guidelines for safeguarding the emotional and physical well-being of the client during the transition from her original plan to the current best plan for her care, to provide a model of collaboration that preserves the dignity of all.
Objectives:
1. The participant will be able to explain the barriers to smooth transport from the perspectives of both the transferring midwife and the receiving provider.
2. The participant as transferring midwife will be able to cite 3 steps to develop a respectful relationship with receiving providers and facilities
3. The participant as receiving provider will have 3 tools s/he can use to facilitate safe, respectful transition on the hospital side
4. The participant will be able to verbalize the importance of protecting safety, dignity and emotional well-being of the client, the client's family, the transferring midwife, and the hospital staff
5. Participants will have 4 tools they will able to use in developing relationships with the hospital, including sample CPGs, transfer forms, and formats for grand rounds.

Friday, May 31, 2013 2:30PM - 3:30PM
Demystifying Diabetes
Friday, May 31, 2:30PM - 3:30PM
Presented by:
Angel Anthamatten, DNP, BC-ADM, FNP-BC


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Demystifying Diabetes will discuss practical ways to integrate Diabetes screening and management into primary care visits. Recent evidence based guidelines will be used as the framework for this presentation, in addition to the speaker's extensive diabetes clinical experience. We hope you will leave this presentation with more resources for your own toolkit.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant should be able to discuss principles for screening of Diabetes Mellitus.
2. At the end of the session the participant should be able to identify diagnostic criteria for diabetes and prediabetes.
3. At the end of the session the participant should be able to discuss select principles for lifestyle modification.
4. At the end of the session the participant should be able to discuss principles guiding pharmacological intervention for diabetes.



From the Womb to the Playroom: Centering Parenting
Friday, May 31, 2:30PM - 3:30PM
Presented by:
Gretchen Mettler, CNM, PhD
Pamela Hetrick, CNM, MSN


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This presentation illustrates the challenges and successes associated with creating a new Centering Parenting program out of a large and thriving Centering Pregnancy practice. The presenters will discuss the successful collaboration between multiple departments and the synergistic relationship between the PNP and the CNM, in order to continue to provide high quality group based care. The presenters will be providing an overview of barriers encountered and the steps taken to overcome them as well as patient satisfaction indicators from the first year of program implementation.
Objectives:
1. Participant will identify possible ways to enhance institutional buy-in, professional participation and cooperation in developing a multi-department program with Centering Parenting.
2. Participants will determine various strategies for overcoming barriers to inter-departmental and inter-professional cooperation within an urban tertiary care center. Specifically, resistance to Advance Nursing Practice will be discussed.
3. Participants will develop strategies to promote continuity of care from antepartum through post partum/well woman and pediatric primary care via CNM collaboration with a PNP.
4. Participants will evaluate measurement of patient satisfaction with care provided in a group-based well care setting.



Keys to successful evaluation and management of chronic pelvic pain
Friday, May 31, 2:30PM - 3:30PM
Presented by:
Amanda Yunker, DO, MSCR


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Chronic pelvic pain can be a difficult clinical scenario for the busy nurse midwife. This presentation will summarize the most common etiologies behind pelvic pain, and offer a standardized evaluation and management plan for those diagnoses.
Objectives:
1. Understand the most likely mechanisms for the generation of chronic pelvic pain.
2. Describe the pain-focused history and physical exam.
3. List the most common pelvic pain syndromes.
4. Describe the diagnostic and treatment pathways appropriate to these syndromes.



Pessaries for the Conservative Treatment of Vaginal Prolapse and Urinary Incontinence
Friday, May 31, 2:30PM - 3:30PM
Presented by:
Suzanne Csorna, MSN, APN


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Pelvic organ prolapse has been an issue since recorded history (and probably before). From the rudimentry pessaries fashioned by Cleopatra herself to the predominantly silicone pessaries available in clinical practice today, the pessary is often a very simple solution to problem that has a significant negative impact on the quality of life of women. Although fitting a pessary is not a difficult task, thorough counseling of the patient is required for successful use. This presentation will begin with a brief overview of the history of pessaries. Next, the following topics regarding the use of pessaries in a clinical setting will be discussed: Review of the pessaries available for managing vaginal prolapse and urinary incontinence, tips and tricks for fitting a pessary properly, appropriate counseling of the patient regarding expectations and proper maintenance of the pessary, and management of both mild and severe complications regarding pessary use.
Objectives:
1. Identify pessaries that are used for the management of pelvic organ prolapse or urinary incontinence, or both.
2. Describe the process of fitting a pessary.
3. Describe education that each patient should receive from their health care provider regarding the maintenance and safe use of a pessary.
4. Describe management of complications from pessary use.



Promoting Primary Vaginal Birth in Hospital Settings
Friday, May 31, 2:30PM - 3:30PM
Presented by:
Holly Kennedy, PhD, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
One in three U.S. mothers will have a surgical birth. Most U.S. births occur in hospitals where policies for childbearing care reflect far more than just the translation of what we learn from research studies into actual care of women. Attitudes and values of clinicians, medical and malpractice insurers, administrative initiatives, and economics influence the development and interpretation of those policies. To effectively improve childbearing care and outcomes in hospitals, all those involved in birth, including women must work together to consider what changes are necessary to improve care and enhance first time mothers’ success at vaginal birth. We conducted a study on hospital birth culture to identify facilitators and barriers in the achievement of a vaginal birth for first time mothers in a hospital setting and identify strategies to foster primary vaginal birth. Using participatory action research, we interviewed 100 clinicians, nurses, administrators, childbirth educators, doulas, and women from a tertiary regional center. A representative group of birth care stakeholders and women worked with the researchers to confirm the research findings. Early admission before establishment of labor and women’s preparation for the realities of childbirth emerged as strong contenders for change. Individual clinicians’ practices were also considered important, as well as inconsistent interpretation and application of evidence into practice. There was a cascade effect on staff when vaginal birth rates dropped and cesarean rates rose. The second phase of the research will work with stakeholders and women in the setting to collaboratively develop, implement, and evaluate changes in birth care to support primary vaginal birth. This presentation will focus on how to implement change through an engaged process within a complex hospital setting.
Objectives:
1. Describe how participatory action can be used as a strategy to understand birth trends in a hospital setting and used to implement change
2. Identify stakeholders’ perceptions of factors that facilitate or hinder a first time mother’s ability to have a vaginal birth
3. Consider two strategies to implement change in hospital settings based on the findings from this study

Friday, May 31, 2013 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Effective, Evidence Based Interventions to Help Women Quit Smoking
Friday, May 31, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Julie Daniels, MN, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This program will cover all the dangers of cigarette smoking in pregnancy based on the evidence. The program will review the physiology of nicotine dependence and why it is so hard for pregnant women to quit smoking. Come learn how you can be an effective partner in your client's effort to quit smoking. Learn about the 'brief intervention' that makes a difference and the basics of Motivational Interviewing. Explore the why, when and safety of medications to treat tobacco dependence.
Objectives:
1. Identify at least three dangers of tobacco exposure during the prenatal period.
2. Identify at least two key components of evidence based smoking cessation treatment geared to pregnant women and who should be screened for tobacco use.
3. Identify at least two of the three key components of Motivational Interviewing.
4. Identify at least one way nicotine and one way carbon monoxide cause harm to the developing fetus.
5. Identify at least two medications utilized for tobacco dependence and when they might be considered for a pregnant client.



Jiggling Babies and Bridging Traditions: Mexican Rebozo in a Tertiary Care Setting
Friday, May 31, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Susanna Cohen, MS, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The rebozo or Mexican shawl has been used traditionally by Mexican midwives to massage pregnant women and optimize fetal position. This presentation will describe and demonstrate multiple uses of the rebozo in pregnancy including: massage to relieve common discomforts of pregnancy, rebozo use to turn posterior or other malpositioned babies in labor, and rebozo use to facilitate maternal comfort in labor. We will examine how we have successfully taken this traditional midwifery art and translated it into a large tertiary care-university hospital. We will also discuss educating students in its use.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant should be able to describe the history and use of the Rebozo to provide comfort during pregnancy and labor.
2. At the end of the session the participant should be able to describe the use of the rebozo during labor and modifications necessary for its use in the US hospital system.
3. At the end of the session the participant should be able to demonstrate 3 techniques for using the rebozo to provide comfort and encourage optimal fetal positioning during labor.



The High Burden Country Initiative: Assessing and strategizing for the midwifery workforce in countries with high burdens of maternal mortality
Friday, May 31, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Anna Maria Speciale
Peter Johnson , PhD CNM FACNM
Anna Maria Speciale, CNM, MSc


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
In September 2010 the United Nations Secretary-General launched the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health. As part of their broader responses, the UN health agencies collectively proposed to support a group of countries with some of the highest numbers of maternal and newborn mortality to strengthen evidence-based policy and its implementation. Along with the government, development partners and professional associations, national assessments of the midwifery workforce tailored to the context and individual needs of the countries were conducted. These assessments led to modeled projections of midwifery service demands and workforce supply and informed costed scenarios and policy options for the skilling up and scaling up of the midwifery workforce. In each of the countries, members of the midwifery workforce including midwives and midwife-researchers played key roles in data collection, analysis and strategizing. Post-assessment policy options were finalized in collaboration with key in-country stakeholders to test their validity, feasibility and ensure alignment with current country activities prior to being sent to the ministries of health for formal endorsement This panel presentation will include two panelist (in total), from two of the four initial target countries (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Ethiopia and Tanzania) as they discuss their experiences with the HBCI in the context of midwifery in their country. Countries represented to be determined. Collaboratively, speakers will address the unique methodology of HBCI, the vital role of midwives in shaping the policy recommendations presented and its potential impact for midwives and the midwifery workforce in their country.
Objectives:
1. Describe the High Burden Country Initiative, its foundations, purpose and methodology and findings.
2. Present the HBCI collaborative methodology from the perspective of participating panelists.
3. Analyze the current midwifery workforce challenges in the four HBCI countries and present goals and strategies for meeting them.



Women's Health: A holistic approach to women's sexual health: Assessing for issues and providing guidance
Friday, May 31, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Ruth Zielinski, PhD, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Sexual health is often not addressed by providers, in part, because they do not feel they have the time or the resources to address these issues. When sexual health is part of the visit the focus is often limited to assessment and treatment of STDs and/or contraception. While these issues are important, a more comprehensive view of sexual health is needed where all aspects of physical, emotional and social well being related to sexuality are taken into account. Therefore, the aim of this presentation is to discuss common sexual concerns that women may have and ways in which CMs and CNMs can identify the source of these problems using an individualized approach. A sexual health model called the “New View” (used with permission by the authors) provides an alternative whereby women’s sexual health issues are not treated with a “one size fits all” approach. The information in this presentation will be offered from a socio-cultural perspective, whereby all aspects of a woman’s life are taken into account rather than focusing only on physiologic issues.
Objectives:
1. Upon completion of this presentation participants will have an increased understanding of the prevalence of sexual health problems among women.
2. Participants will be able to identify the socio cultural factors that influence women’s sexual health. For example, women’s lack of knowledge about their bodies.
3. Participants will understand the influence of partner and relationship issues that can negatively influence women's sexual health.
4. Participants will be able to identify the emotional and psychological factors such as depression and body image disorders that influence sexual health.
5. Participants will understand the physiologic issues that can influence women's sexual health and the challenges associated with surgical or medical treatment of these issues.
6. Participants will be able to translate the information from this presentation to their CM/CNM practices in order to better assess for sexual health issues, identify the potential causes and to provide education and guidance to women.



You say tomato: effective communication strategies for faculty, preceptors and students
Friday, May 31, 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presented by:
Melissa Willmarth, DNP, CNM, APRN
Judy Lazarus, MSN, CNM, ARNP
Tonya Nicholson, DNP, CNM, WHNP-BC


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
An essential component in clinical education is effective communication. Students and preceptors often struggle with how to communicate concerning difficult topics. The purpose of this session is to gain insight and confidence when using strategies for effective and meaningful communication. Clinical faculty, preceptors and students will have the opportunities to learn, integrate and apply communication techniques for the clinical setting including recognizing issues and how to have difficult discussions on topics such as student remediation, clinical expectations and complex learning situations.
Objectives:
1. Participants will understand effective communication in midwifery education.
2. Participants will learn strategies for having difficult conversations in the clinical area.
3. Participants will integrate concepts of effective communication into methods for dealing with student remediation.
4. Participants will articulate common issues between faculty, preceptors and students and be able to utilize resolution methods.
5. Participants will role model effective communication strategies that can be used in clinical teaching.

Saturday, June 01, 2013 10:00AM - 11:00AM
Building Bridges: Practical Strategies for Midwife and Physician Collaboration
Saturday, June 01, 10:00AM - 11:00AM
Presented by:
Autumn Vergo, NHCM, CPM, RN


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters – Business
Session Description:
This presentation focuses on northern New England's initiatives to improve collaboration between community-based midwives and providers in the hospital system. The development of northern New England's innovative approach to improving communication and transport systems occurred simultaneously with a new, national emphasis on collaborative practice as described in the Homebirth Consensus Statements (2011). We will discuss the role of a regional perinatal improvement collaborative association, as well as programs and projects designed to improve inter-professional communication and patient safety.
Objectives:
1. The learner will discuss national trends toward collaboration between hospital-based staff/ providers and community-based midwives.
2. The learner will identify points at which cultural misunderstanding leads to communication breakdown between community based and hospital based personnel.
3. The learner will compare reported data about transport rates, practices & outcomes with interview statements by women who have experienced transport in labor.
4. The learner will identify the current trends driving collaboration among community-based midwives and hospital-based providers in VT and NH
5. The learner will understand the governance and membership of a regional perinatal improvement collaborative organization.
6. The learner will describe programs and projects designed to improve inter-professional communication and patient safety.



Early Skin-to-Skin Contact for Mothers and their Healthy Newborns
Saturday, June 01, 10:00AM - 11:00AM
Presented by:
Elizabeth Moore, PhD, RN, IBCLC


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
In humans, routine mother-infant separation shortly after birth is unique to the 20th century. This practice diverges from evolutionary history, where neonatal survival depended on close and virtually continuous maternal contact. This presentation will report the results of a 2012 Cochrane Review of early skin-to-skin contact including thirty-four studies with 2177 mother-infant dyads. Implications for clinical practice will also be discussed.
Objectives:
1. Discuss the theoretical rationale for why early skin-to-skin contact is beneficial for mother and baby.
2. Identify the benefits of early skin-to-skin contact for mother and baby.
3. Describe strategies for implementing early skin-to-skin contact in the clinical setting.



Primary Care Management of Anxiety and Depression
Saturday, June 01, 10:00AM - 11:00AM
Presented by:
Amy Bull, PhD, FNP-BC


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This session will cover current, evidence-based information on the identification of patients appropriate for nonpharmacological and pharmacological management of anxiety and/or depression. Evidence-based treatment strategies will be discussed to assist providers in choosing the best approved medication regimen. Appropriate titration of medications, patient follow-up plans, length of treatment and referral recomemendations for female pregnant and non-pregnant patients will be discussed.
Objectives:
1. Utilize primary care tools to identify patients appropriate for management of anxiety and/or depression with non-pharmacological and approved pharmacological therapies.
2. Choose safe and effective approved medications for female adult patients.
3. Recognize partial treatment response and treatment failure and identify appropriate strategies for handling these situations.

Saturday, June 01, 2013 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Global Partnerships for Midwifery Education
Saturday, June 01, 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Presented by:
Karen Ruby Brown , CNM, MSN
Jane Beshore, MSN, CNM
Jenny Foster


CEUs = 0.15
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
In this session, Jane Beshore will present on “Midwifery Education in Developing Countries: Two Case Studies” from Mexico and Haiti; Jenny Foster will discuss “Global cultural immersion for nursing and midwifery students: the development and sustainability of international partnership sites for the 21st Century; and Karen Ruby Brown will share her work from West Kalimantan, Indonesia in a presentation entitled: “To Be Born in Borneo: midwives, clinics, NGOs and local government working together to improve outcomes.”
Objectives:
1. By the end of the session the participant will gain insight into the curriculum of midwifery programs in two developing countries, Oaxaca, Mexico and Hinche, Haiti and give examples of barriers graduates experience in practicing midwifery.
2. By the end of the session the participant will be able to develop a comprehensive student and faculty orientation prior to departure and immediately post travel as well as analyze the range of ethical challenges and appropriate responses to maintain partnership sites.
3. By the end of the session the participant will understand, in a general sense, the history and current status of Indonesian midwifery and learn about the history-in-the-making of a collaborative continuing education program for midwives in Sukadana, West Kalimantan, Indonesia.

Saturday, June 01, 2013 10:00AM - 2:00PM
WK20 Skills Update and Review for Students, New Grads to Experienced Midwives
Saturday, June 01, 10:00AM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Michelle Collins


CEUs =
Rx =
Fee = $150.00
Student Fee = $75.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This is a workshop geared to students who are already enrolled in a nurse-midwifery program and the new nurse-midwifery graduate who desires to shore up his/her newly gained skills, or for those who have graduated within the past 5 years, but have not been practicing.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the workshop, the participant will be able to demonstrate technique for insertion of both the copper and the progesterone intrauterine devices.
2. At the end of the workshop, the participant will be able to demonstrate the technique of endometrial biopsy.
3. At the end of the workshop, the participant will be able to demonstrate the technique of shave, punch and scalpel directed biopsy.
4. At the end of the workshop, the participant will be able to demonstrate the various suturing techniques necessary to repair either the laceration or episiotomy.

Saturday, June 01, 2013 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Asthma & Headaches: Primary Care 2013
Saturday, June 01, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Amy Bull, PhD, FNP-BC


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
No description available at time of publication
Objectives:
1. Describe appropriate primary care evaluation of asthma during child-bearing years.
2. Describe appropriate primary care evaluation of headache during child-bearing years.
3. Analyze current evidence-based treatment strategies appropriate for asthma and headache in the pregnant and non-pregnant patient.



Leveraging Global Development Alliances to Scale Up Maternal and Newborn Interventions
Saturday, June 01, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Angie Fujioka, CNM, MSN, MPH


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
The Global Development Alliance (GDA) approach, as demonstrated by “Helping Babies Breathe” and “Survive and Thrive,” is a powerful and innovative way of scaling up priority interventions through public-private partnerships while leveraging other partner resources. This presentation will describe what this approach is and how it has brought together multiple partners, including US professional associations, to expand the global availability of life-saving interventions. Examples from Bangladesh and Cambodia will describe how the approach has been applied in countries to scale up the American Academy of Pediatrics’ training program “Helping Babies Breathe.” The Survive and Thrive GDA goes a step beyond Helping Babies Breathe; it intends to strengthen professional associations in developing countries by establishing mentoring partnerships with US professional associations. This GDA also intends create opportunities to nurture emerging leaders in global health in collaboration with universities and professional associations.
Objectives:
1. Learners will be able to describe the process of developing public-private partnerships with USAID and the US professional associations for the Survive and Thrive Global Development Alliance.
2. Learners will be able to describe the role that volunteer members of professional associations can play in the improvement of maternal and newborn health.
3. Learners will be able to understand the mechanisms through which midwifery programs at universities will participate with the Global Development Alliance.
4. Learners will understand the critical role that professional associations fill in civil society to ensure competency of members, influence policy decisions and provide advocacy for maternal/newborn health.



New Guidelines: US Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use
Saturday, June 01, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Patricia Murphy, CNM, DrPH


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Common yet controversial contraceptive management questions persist among clinicians and the general public. Some women are unnecessarily restricted from using appropriate contraceptive methods or inappropriately managed on methods that they use. Selected practice recommendations (SPR) for contraceptive use were first written as broad recommendations by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2002, and last updated in 2008. The United States Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Reproductive Health has recently developed selected practice recommendations for US practitioners, to be released by the CDC in 2013. This session will present this new source of evidence-based management.The presenter was part of the panel that met to develop these guidelines at the CDC in 2011.
Objectives:
1. Identify current sources of evidence-based selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use.
2. Identify similarities and differences between WHO and US SPR.
3. Describe current US recommendations for contraceptive management in selected conditions.



Understanding and Negotiating Employment Contracts for Midwives
Saturday, June 01, 1:00PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
William Blue, Jr., JD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters – Business
Session Description:
The terms of employment for health care providers, unlike most occupations, often are set out in formal written contracts. The employer, of course, prepares it to favor the employer. Everyone, as Herr Gutman taught Sam Spade in the Maltese Falcon, has an interest in 'plain speaking and clear understandings.' Midwives should protect their interests in a way consistent with good employment relationships. This program will provide general guidance for midwives about how to read and negotiate employment contracts.
Objectives:
1. At the end of this session the participant will be able to identify and evaluate the terms of the employment relationship most important to them.
2. At the end of this session the participant will be able to understand what the proposed contract language means and what options exist in general terms.
3. At the end of this session the participant will have a preliminary understanding of which terms tend to be negotiable and how to negotiate those terms

Saturday, June 01, 2013 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Gynecological Care for Women with Special Needs
Saturday, June 01, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Barbara Camune, CNM, WHNP-BC, DrPH, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This presentation will address the care of women with special needs who come for gynecological concerns. The focus will be directed at equipment adaption, proper communication styles, educational techniques, and the art of examination for women experiencing a variety of disabling conditions including developmental challenges. A review of appropriate contraceptive considerations for selected disabling conditions will be included.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant should be able to describe the equipment adaptions needed to safely examine a woman with a physical disability.
2. At the end of the seession the participant should be able to discuss proper terminology and communication styles that are acceptable to a disabled woman.
3. At the end of the session the participant should be able to compare and contrast the examination techniques that can be employed to enhance comfort for the disabled woman
4. At the end of the session the participant should be able to communicate the risks and benefits in the use of hormonal contraception for a selected group of disabling conditions.
5. At the end of the session the participant should be able to distinguish between health education techniques used with physically disbled women and those used with developmentally challenged women.



Impact of Group Prenatal Care on Women with Medical Risk Factors: Findings from Vanderbilt
Saturday, June 01, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Deborah Wage, MSN, CNM, FNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
A report by Peabody Research Institute (PRI) at Vanderbilt has found that women with medical risk factors participating in group care at Vanderbilt Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology had significant improvement in several perinatal outcomes when compared to women with the same risk profile in traditional care. In our program, women with risk are not excluded from group care and groups are not structured by payer or social demographics. This open model retains and promotes diversity. We believe the impact of our approach to the program structure is clearly demonstrated in the aforementioned results from the PRI analysis of our program and has implications for structuring models of care for women with medical risk factors
Objectives:
1. The learner will understand the goal and purpose for the State of Tennessee funding of the Centering Pregnancy Initiative to improve perinatal outcomes
2. The learner will understand the methodology and results of the Peabody Report on the State of Tennessee Centering Pregnancy Initiative
3. The learner will understand the results for Vanderbilt and the impact of group prenatal care for women with 4 medical risk factors compared to the same population of women in individual care
4. The learner will understand how the data showing improved outcomes for women with medical risk in group care has implications for the need to restructure prenatal care
5. The learner will consider other proposed alternatives to traditional prenatal care to stimulate innovative ideas toward new models of care
6. The learner will have gained insight and knowledge to develope strategies toward restructuring prenatal care models in their own communities and institutions in order to meet the needs of the increasing number of complicated pregnancies.



Is my baby healthy? Advances and New Technology in Genetic Testing
Saturday, June 01, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Martha Dudek, MS LCGC


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The past few years have brought advancements in genetics to clinical practice in several critical area of maternal and fetal health. This presentation will provide an overview of genetics and recent advances in prenatal genetics. The clinical application of the following new technologies will be discussed using case examples: non-invasive prenatal testing, universal carrier screening for autosomal recessive conditions, array comparative genomic hybridization (microarray) analysis. The indications, benefits and limitations of each will be reviewed. Insurance
Objectives:
1. Give examples of how recent advances in genetics have translated into clinical tests for women and babies both prior, during and after birth to help assess baby's health.
2. Interpret results from non-invasive prenatal testing and describe the limitations of testing to patients.
3. Examine results from universal carrier screening for autosomal recessive conditions and describe the limitations of testing to patients.
4. Recognize indications for array comparative genomic hybridization (microarray) analysis in the prenatal and pediatric setting.



Tackling Disrespect and Abuse of Women in Childbirth in Kenya and Tanzania
Saturday, June 01, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
Mary Ellen Stanton, CNM, MSN
Lynn Freedman
Nancy Termini


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
Disrespect and abuse of women during childbirth is widespread throughout the world and has been documented in many countries by Hill and Bowser in a 2010 landscape review. This session will focus on the situation in Tanzania and Kenya where the type of abuse and prevalence of the problem has recently been investigated and will be presented. Currently, diverse stakeholders in each country are working together to identify and implement solutions. The process of working with women, health care providers, community members, village leaders, and ministry of health officials at district and regional levels, will be described, as well as the implementation research approach underway. This process will provide insight into approaches that can be adapted to other countries throughout the world to promote respectful care for all women giving birth -- building on the 2011 Universal Rights of the Childbearing Women.
Objectives:
1. "Describe the types and prevalence of disrespect and abuse found in childbirth in selected health facilities in Kenya and Tanzania "
2. "Discuss various approaches underway to promote respectful care of childbearing women in African settings "
3. Discuss the importance of interpersonal communication, physical infrastructure, and key policies and practices to ensure movement toward full realization of the Universal Rights of the Childbearing Women



What To Do When Things Go Wrong – Disclosure, Apology and Healing
Saturday, June 01, 2:15PM - 3:15PM
Presented by:
John Keats , MD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
In the course of a clinical career, we will all confront unexpected complications, adverse outcomes and medical errors that result in harm to our patients. This talk will discuss the appropriate response to these events in terms of dealing with our patients, our colleagues and ourselves. I will review why it is important to disclose medical errors to patients, and what are the barriers that often inhibit this. I will identify in very practical terms the when, where, who and what of disclosure conversations. This talk will help attendees understand the role of apology in the healing process for both patients and caregivers, and identify resources to help in this.
Objectives:
1. Describe the reasons for disclosure of medical errors
2. Understand the common barriers to disclosure
3. Identify the when, where, who and what of effective disclosure
4. Understand the role of apology in the healing process for both patient and caregiver

Saturday, June 01, 2013 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Gentle Birth Practices and Cord Clamping: New Evidence
Saturday, June 01, 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Judith Mercer, PhD, CNM, FACNM
Debra Erickson-Owens, CNM, PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
When the umbilical cord is cut immediately at birth, 20 to 40% of the fetal-placental blood volume is left behind in the placenta including enough iron-rich red blood cells to meet the infant’s iron needs for the first 4 to 6 months of life. Delaying cord clamping has been shown to increase early iron stores without contributing to adverse outcomes. Iron deficiency in infancy adversely affects myelination and cognitive, motor, socio-emotional, and behavioral development. Abnormal myelination underlies a variety of childhood developmental disorders including conditions such as autism. A full placental transfusion at birth provides the infant's first stem cell transplant and may be essential to newborn and child health. Past and current studies will be reviewed along with the role of red blood cells, stem cells, and iron in neurodevelopment. Practice issues will be addressed especially resuscitation with an intact cord.
Objectives:
1. Describe three benefits that placental transfusion offers to the neonate.
2. Discuss the current literature on placental transfusion.
3. Describe why there are so many circulating stem cells in a newborn’s blood and explain how these cells may help to protect an infant.
4. Discuss the effects of delayed cord clamping on an infant’s iron stores at 3 to 6 months and how this may affect neurodevelopment.
5. Explain how birth practices for normal birth and complex situations can be modified when placental transfusion is desired (resuscitation, nuchal cord, cesarean, blood gases, and the issue of cord blood harvesting).
6. Explain how placental transfusion fits in the triad of essential birth practices.



HIV Prevention: Women and Reproductive Choices
Saturday, June 01, 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Jan Kriebs, CNM, MSN, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
There was a time, not long ago, when HIV could not be treated,and one in four babies born to HIV positive mothers was infected. We now live in an era when we can effectively prevent perinatal HIV transmission. More, we can protect HIV negative partners from heterosexual transmission, even when the couple plans a pregnancy. Effective antiretroviral therapy and the possibility of pre-exposure prophylaxis greatly reduce the risks of HIV transmission. This presentation reviews the testing, counseling, and interventions that promote healthy outcomes for couples and their desired children.
Objectives:
1. Discuss appropriate strategies for counseling women about HIV risks and testing
2. Describe the use of antiretroviral therapy to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV
3. Counsel couples and individuals about pre-exposure prophylaxis as part of a strategy to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV



Midwives advocating for themselves: Improving status and working conditions of midwives in Tanzania
Saturday, June 01, 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Theresa Shaver , BSN, PHN


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
Purpose of presentation is to share advocacy approaches that are used by White Ribbon Alliance in Tanzania to raise many voices in support of midwives and their high value in the country’s maternal health system and highlight results that are have been achieved so far.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant should be able to demonstrate knowledge on engaging policy makers to create an enabling environment that maximizes the contribution of midwives in reducing maternal and newborn deaths
2. At the end of the session the participant should be able to demonstrate knowledge on mobilizing communities to promote midwifery and change public perception of midwifery.
3. At the end of the session the participant should be able to demonstrate advocacy skills.



The Latest Approach to Diagnosis and Management of PCOS
Saturday, June 01, 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Lucy Koroma, WHNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
PCOS is the most common endocrine disorder in women. Becoming a knowledgeable clinician is important to the management of patient symptoms. Moreover, treatment is critical for fertility and to their long term health.
Objectives:
1. Review the diagnostic criteria for PCOS and the differential diagnoses.
2. Understand the importance of treating insulin resistance in order to manage PCOS.
3. Discuss the importance of life style modifications to enhance and support overall PCOS treatment goals.
4. Highlight updates in the initial treatment of infertile PCOS women.



The Use of IUDs in the Immediate Postpartum Period: A Safe and Effective Contaceptive Option
Saturday, June 01, 3:30PM - 4:30PM
Presented by:
Susan DeJoy, CNM, PhD
Katharine White, MD, MPH


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Postpartum contraception is essential for the prevention of rapid repeat pregnancies. Increased VTE risk and concerns about hormones and breastfeeding are obstacles to safe and effective contraception use. Intrauterine devices are a highly effective but underutilized method of birth control. Many women who plan to receive an IUD at their postpartum visit never receive it. We will review the literature attesting to the safety and effectiveness of immediate postpartum IUD insertion. We will outline the elements of an immediate postpartum IUD program, including clinical considerations, training procedures, policy development, payment concerns and quality assurance.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session, the participant should be able to discuss the barriers for women in obtaining safe and effective contraception in the immediate postpartum period.
2. At the end of the session, the participant should be able to understand the research related to the safety and effectiveness of immediate postpartum IUD insertion.
3. At the end of the session, the participant should be able to discuss the clinical components of immediate postpartum IUD insertion.
4. At the end of the session, the participant should be able to delineate the components of training, policy development, payment and quality assurance necessary for an immediate postpartum IUD insertion program.

Saturday, June 01, 2013 4:45PM - 5:45PM
Developing and Implementing Guidelines for CNMs and CMs who Attend Home Births
Saturday, June 01, 4:45PM - 5:45PM
Presented by:
Elizabeth Cook, DNP, CNM, WHNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This session will explore the hypothesis that adoption of nationally-recognized guidelines for certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and certified midwives (CMs) who attend home births may improve homebirth outcomes and foster consistent, evidence-based homebirth practices. Many countries with homebirth midwives integrated into their healthcare systems have national or provincial guidelines for their midwives, and also have maternity statistics superior to those of the U.S. Low risk maternity clients deserve to have the option to receive intrapartum care in the home setting within a supportive interdisciplinary maternity system. One potential systems-based gap contributing to the poor integration of homebirth midwifery in the greater U.S. maternity system is the current lack of homebirth guidelines. A draft set of homebirth guidelines that could be used in the U.S., and results of their review by midwives practicing in the homebirth setting, will be presented.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant will be able to state potential benefits of national homebirth guidelines.
2. At the end of the session the participant will be able to state potential disadvantages of national homebirth guidelines.
3. At the end of the session the participant will be able to state the evidential and international support for developing homebirth guidelines in the U.S.



Dynamics of Interpersonal Violence and the Childbearing Experience
Saturday, June 01, 4:45PM - 5:45PM
Presented by:
Tara Cardinal, MN, CNM, ARNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
This session will provide didactic and experiential tools to prepare nurse midwives to support childbearing women experiencing interpersonal violence. This comprehensive training will equip participants to assess and meet the interpersonal violence survivor's unique healthcare and social support needs, especially screening and counseling as mandated by the Affordable Care Act. This session will cultivate an understanding of the dynamics of interpersonal violence in pregnancy, its impacts on mother and child and prepare participants to meet their unique health and social service needs in a collaborative manner - with the client and other community and institutional resources. At the same time, the participant will learn how to sustainably engage in this work hile caring for oneself.
Objectives:
1. Participant will describe 5 ways that interpersonal violence impacts maternal and neonatal physiology.
2. Participant will identify 3 ways they can support a mother with a history of trauma anticipate and cope with potential triggers that might arise throughout the childbearing year.
3. Participant will identify 3 resources they can offer their patients to support safety and effective help seeking.
4. Participant will be able to articulate 5 legal, health and/or social barriers to leaving an abusive situation while pregnant.
5. Participant will familiarize themselves with the power and control wheel and give an example for how a pregnant woman might uniquely experience each of its eight dimensions: male privilege; emotional abuse; using children; physical abuse; minimizing; denying and blame; sexual abuse; coercion and threats; financial abuse; intimidation; and isolation.
6. Participant will describe two resources/curriculum that will enhance their practice's ability to comprehensively screen and counsel pregnant women experiencing interpersonal violence.



Epigenetics and Nutrition in pregnancy: the Long-Term Impact on Babies
Saturday, June 01, 4:45PM - 5:45PM
Presented by:
Laurel Wilson


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
It’s time to set many of the pregnancy myths aside and teach mothers what they really need to know about nutrition in pregnancy. A woman’s nutritional intake has epigenetic outcomes, meaning that what she eats actually changes the genetic expression of her baby. A woman’s diet in pregnancy can change her baby’s palate, cravings and rewards centers of her baby’s brain, risk of diabetes and risk of obesity. Additionally, the typical American foods eaten during pregnancy do very little to nourish the pregnant woman’s body, let alone nourish her baby. Join Laurel Wilson to learn about how to counsel mothers on better choices and using conscious agreement to make choices for a vibrant and healthy pregnancy.
Objectives:
1. Identify at least 4 important ways to optimize pregnancy through nutrition.
2. Describe how to use conscious agreement for positive prenatal nutrition.
3. Identify at least one food that benefits a woman during each trimester of pregnancy.
4. Identify at least three epigenetic influences from nutrition on the fetus



The Ritgen Maneuver: It Deserves a Rebirth
Saturday, June 01, 4:45PM - 5:45PM
Presented by:
Elaine Diegmann, CNM, ND, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The Ritgen Maneuver is still germane to practice today. Whether it is considered basic or advanced, it is a clinical tool worthy of discussion in this current birthing environment. It was first described by Ferdinand August Marie Tanz Von Ritgen in a German publication in l855 and first appeared in print in Williams Obstetrics in 1971 (Greve, 2009/2010). Its purpose has always been defined as protecting the musculature of the perineum. It is more than just a definition in an OB textbook. It is a maneuver that can effectively execute a birth in specific instances. It can expedite a controlled birth more efficientlly and decrease the time that the fetal head sits on the perineum. There is a paucity of literature written about the Ritgen Maneuver and what is written is inconsistant. According to Jonsson (2008) it does not decrease the incidence of severe lacerations especially if it is utilized during a contraction. In a study published in 1998 in Sweden and Finland, the maneuver was shown to be protective against severe lacerations of the perineum.This presentation will discuss the various uses of the Ritgen Maneuver for maternal and fetal conditions. It will describe and demonstrate the maneuver.It will discuss how the maneuver can improve fetal outcomes by expediting the birth and decrease maternal trauma by controlling the speed of the birth of the head and keeping the smallest fetal diameter descending. Innovative uses for the maneuver will be shared. The Ritgen Maneuver can be called the 'midwifery forceps'. It is the non-interventive intervention which can favor vaginal birth in the current medicalized birthing environment. All that is needed is the midwifery 'gold standard' OUR HANDS.
Objectives:
1. Define the Ritgen Maneuver historically and currently.
2. Describe the steps and proper hand placement for the safe application and execution of the maneuver.
3. Perform the Ritgen Maneuver to expedite the birth safely and effectively.
4. Describe the maternal and fetal conditions in which the use of the maneuver would be appropriate.



The Use of Simulation to Teach Ethics in Midwifery Education
Saturday, June 01, 4:45PM - 5:45PM
Presented by:
Michelle Collins


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
An understanding of bioethics related to the care of women, newborns and families is a Core Competency. However, teaching ethics to midwifery students presents a number of challenges. Ethics has traditionally been taught in a didactic format, which often results in a very one dimensional presentation. This session will demonstrate the use of simulation to bring to life ethical situations, allowing midwifery students to learn via a 'virtual' experience. Ethics simulation brings common ethical situations that midwife students will inevitably face in their professional lives directly to them to enable them to rehearse both reaction and problem-solving behaviors. The ability to hone ethical problem-solving skills in a protected simulation environment affords students the confidence to be able to leave midwifery education programs feeling that they are well equipped to address the ethical situations they will face.
Objectives:
1. "1. At the end of the session the participant will be able to describe specific techniques to use in the teaching of ethics in simulation"
2. "2. At the end of the session the participant will be able to discuss how to lead student debriefing after ethical simulations, as well as how to diffuse student anxiety regarding future ethical dilemmas they will likely face. "
3. "3. At the end of the session the participant will be able to elicit specific ethical situations appropriate for, and conducive to, use with simulation exercises"

Sunday, June 02, 2013 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Are you hot or is it me? Management of peri- and post-menopause symptoms.
Sunday, June 02, 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Presented by:
Angela Deneris


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
As women age they may seek treatment for symptoms of peri- and post-menopause symptoms. Midwives need to be prepared to offer a variety of treatment options to improve quality of life for women as they navigate this time in their lives. Pharmacologic and alternative therapies including exercise and nutrition will be discussed.
Objectives:
1. Define the peri- and post-menopause.
2. Review normal hormonal production and the physiology of peri- and post-menopause.
3. Discuss the most common symptoms and diseases during peri- and post-menopause, including when to do an endometrial biopsy or when to refer for surgical treatment.
4. Discuss treatment options for women experiencing symptoms that reduce quality of life. WHI data, NAMS position statements and evidenced based therapies and alternative therapies will be discussed.
5. Case studies from the presenter’s practice will be discussed.
6. Introduce a coordinated multidisciplinary clinic for management of midlife health concerns.



Standardization of the Second Stage of Labor: Is it Possible?
Sunday, June 02, 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Presented by:
Samantha Sommerness, DNP, RN, CNM
Charles Hirt, MD
Becky Gams, MS, RN, CNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The goal of the project was to reduce the number of preventable birth injuries, while improving the quality and cost of care during the second stage of labor within a healthcare system in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The project team adapted, revised, and implemented a standardized guideline for women with an epidural in the second stage of labor as one of the strategies for improving perinatal safety. The guideline set the following parameters: (a) candidates for appropriate use of the guideline, (b) strategies to mitigate labor progress issues, (c) confirmation measures to assure that both mother and fetus are not in jeopardy and (d) determining intervention steps if jeopardy is identified. Delayed pushing in women with epidurals until the urge to push is present is an effective strategy to improve maternal and neonatal outcomes. The experience of a community hospital following implementation of a standardized second stage evidence-based guideline showed significant improvements including a reduction in the length of active pushing, a decrease in vacuum assisted deliveries and thus a reduction in 3rd lacerations without increasing the total length of second stage. The guideline was subsequently implemented at an academic medical center with a differing patient population and provider mix. The study was replicated and the results compared to determine the generalizability of the guideline. This presentation will describe the overall project from a quality improvement and change management perspective including: establishing the current state of clinical practice, education of nurses and providers, data collection and analysis and some of the financial impacts of implementing a perinatal quality and safety initiative. Lessons learned, adaptive work surrounding changing the culture of care and obstacles encountered will be shared. Strategies for change management across hospitals with different cultures, stable vs continually revolving providers, provider mix, and patient populations with comorbities will be reviewed.
Objectives:
1. "1. Describe specific strategies for implementation of a standardized second stage of labor guideline at various hospital types – academic, urban and rural."
2. "2. Describe the implementation process from a quality improvement perspective including: establishing current state of clinical practice, education of staff and providers, data collection and analysis as well as obstacles and lessons learned."
3. "3. Identify improved total cost of care and maternal and newborn outcomes resulting from the use of an evidence-based guideline to standardize the management of the second stage of labor."



The Normalization of Deviance: Are You Guilty?
Sunday, June 02, 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Presented by:
Janelle Komorowski, CNM, MS


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The term, normalization of deviance, has been defined as “the phenomenon in which individuals unknowingly persist in detrimental patterns of behavior based on a low frequency of individual adverse experience'. Initially coined to describe events leading to the space shuttle Challenger disaster, the term can also describe the state of modern obstetrics today. Many midwives frequently perform procedures which are not evidence based for routine use. This presentation will explore common obstetric procedures that are lacking in evidence to support their routine use, and assist the midwife in identifying steps to bring his/her midwifery practice in line with current evidence.
Objectives:
1. 1. The participant will be able to identify three commonly used pharmaceuticals/botanicals/supplements which are not evidence-based.
2. The participant will identify six perinatal practices used routinely,which are not evidence based, and identify their appropriate use.
3. The participant will list three steps he/she can take to begin to bring his/her practice in line with current evidence, and to work with nurses and collaborating physicians to support evidence-based practice.



Using motivational interviewing to talk about Obesity & Weight Gain in Pregnancy
Sunday, June 02, 7:30AM - 8:30AM
Presented by:
Cecilia Jevitt, CNM, PhD, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Afraid to alienate women if you discuss obesity risks and prenatal weight gain? This session focuses on applying motivational interviewing techniques and the Rs of behavior change to help obese and overweight women optimize prenatal weight gain in a non-threatening manner that empowers women to change their eating behaviors. This session focuses on conversation and interaction rather than prenatal nutrition specifics.Methods for employing motivational interviewing in busy practices are presented along with examples of conversations with patients and prenatal weight gain plans.
Objectives:
1. "At the conclusion of the presentation the learner will:• Identify maternal and fetal health risks that can be lowered by appropriate weight gain in pregnancy"
2. "At the conclusion of the presentation the learner will:• Apply the components of motivational interviewing to talking with obese women about prenatal weight gain"
3. "At the conclusion of the presentation the learner will:• Apply the Rs of behavior change to planning prenatal weight gain for women who are obese"
4. "At the conclusion of the presentation the learner will:• Use the concepts of motivational interviewing and the Rs of behavior change to provide weight gain follow-up during prenatal care for women who are obese or gaining more weight than recommended by the Institute of Medicine"
5. At the conclusion of the presentation the learner will:- Describe 4 methods for integrating motivational interviewing into a busy practice

Sunday, June 02, 2013 12:30PM - 2:00PM
Addressing the Gaps in Midwifery Education: A Global Update
Sunday, June 02, 12:30PM - 2:00PM
Presented by:
Peter Johnson , PhD CNM FACNM
Joyce Thompson, DrPH, RN, CNM, FAAN, FACNM
Judith Fullerton, PhD, CNM, FACNM
Maureen Kelley, PhD, CNM, FACNM


CEUs = 0.15
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
This presentation builds upon and provides an essential update to last year’s panel presentation. This year's panel, comprised of international midwifery education experts, will analyze the major issues affecting our ability to educate sufficient midwives with the essential competences needed to promote maternal health and reduce maternal mortality. Discussion will be framed around The State of the World’s Midwifery Report released in 2011 and recent educational findings from the current High Burden Country Initiative analyzing barriers affecting midwifery workforce development in countries with the highest maternal mortality. Panelists will also review recent evidence from a systematic review of best practices for meeting, and resources available for building capacity to meet ICM educational standards.
Objectives:
1. Using the ICM educational standards as a framework, learners will consider global gaps in midwifery education.
2. Learners will be able to describe the educational implications of the State of the World's Midwifery Report.
3. Learners will be able to describe the educational implications of the High Burden Country Initiative.
4. Learners will be able to access resources available to support midwifery education capacity building in countries with insufficient numbers of quality midwives.
5. Learners will be able to describe some innovative local solutions to midwifery education settings with significant constraints.

Sunday, June 02, 2013 12:45PM - 1:45PM
Division of Research (DOR) Research Forum II
Sunday, June 02, 12:45PM - 1:45PM
Presented by:
Carrie Klima, CNM, PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Miscellaneous
Session Description:
Presented in this forum: 1. Helping Women with the Blues: An Evaluation of an Effective Screening Program for Perinatal Depression Barbara Hackley, CNM; Chanchal Sharma, Psy D, MSEd, MA; Jo Applebaum, MPH 2. Shared decisions that are best for them: What do women value when choosing birth after cesarean? Allison Shorten, RN RM MSc PhD FACM; Brett Shorten; Holly Powell Kennedy, CNM PhD FACNM FAAN 3. Centering pregnancy: A comparison of select pregnancy outcomes between women receiving traditional and group prenatal care Ruth Zielinski, PhD, CNM; Leslie Stork; Cathy Kothari, MS; Megan Deibel, MS, CNM



Electronic Prescribing: A Primer to integrating ERX into your practice
Sunday, June 02, 12:45PM - 1:45PM
Presented by:
Karen King
Melinda Hoskins


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Electronic prescribing (ERX) is here to stay, its the future. How to integrate ERX into your practice will be discussed and reviewed. Why ERX is an important tool you should consider using in your practice. Help with overcoming the pitfalls of electric prescribing.
Objectives:
1. At the end of the session the participant should be able to demonstrate why it is important to integrate Electronic prescribing into their practice.
2. At the end of the session the participant will understand the limitations and restrictions of electronic prescribing.
3. At the end of the session the participant will have a better understanding of how to use electronic prescribing.



Role of midwives in improving VBAC access and success
Sunday, June 02, 12:45PM - 1:45PM
Presented by:
Mary Barger, PhD, MPH, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
VBAC rates have plummeted to 5% while the cesarean rate remains high. This presentation will discuss both the quantitative and qualitative results of a cross-sectional survey of all 243 birth hospitals in California. The survey obtained information on hospital and provider facilitators and barriers to offering trial of labor after cesarean (TOLAC). It will include a review of known measures that facilitate successful VBAC birth. Lastly, it will discuss strategies midwives can use to promote increased access to TOLAC or to maintain /improve access including framing access as a ethical right to self-autonomy.
Objectives:
1. Discuss the issues related to TOLAC access as described in the NIH Consensus panel report and where this report may differ from ACOG guidelines.
2. Describe the design of the California TOLAC Study and its findings.
3. Identify key policy, provider, and resource issues related to the ability of a hospital to offer TOLAC.
4. Discuss known evidenced-based clinical strategies that promote successful VBAC births.
5. Describe possible strategies midwives can use to encourage the facilities they work in offer TOLAC or continue offering TOLAC.



Why Providers get Sued
Sunday, June 02, 12:45PM - 1:45PM
Presented by:
Gerald Hickson, MD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters – Public Perception
Session Description:
Healthcare professionals commit to not only technical and cognitive excellence, but to other professional attributes such as clear and effective communication, modeling respect, teamwork, and being available. Yet, healthcare professionals also seemingly tolerate unnecessary variation in behavior/performance that undermines their culture of safety and increases medical malpractice claims risk.(1) Malpractice risk is a concern of hospitals, medical centers, and healthcare professionals because claims can interrupt patient care, influence patient loyalty, preoccupy time and minds, and increase costs of healthcare. Learning why patients sue can help professionals and organizations reduce unnecessary malpractice claims, and improve patient safety and healthcare quality.Studies show that malpractice risk is related in large measure to patient/family dissatisfaction with their their healthcare experiences. (2-5) Recently published research indicates that patients and families observe and report adverse events and medical errors that are not captured elsewhere in institutional reporting systems or medical records. Research conducted by the faculty of the Center for Patient and Professional Advocacy at Vanderbilt shows that unsolicited patient complaints can be used to reliably identify unsafe systems and healthcare professionals at increased risk of being sued. (2-5) In addition, the aggregated data can be used to support interventions with healthcare professionals to reduce that risk. As a result, the CPPA created the PARS® program, a reliable tool and a validated process designed to identify and address professionals and service units with greater levels of risk management-­-related activity.Through case-based scenarios derived from actual patient complaints, this program will illustrate why patients sue, and explore the relationship between unnecessary variation in behavior/performance, a culture of safety and quality, and malpractice risk.
Objectives:
1. Identify factors contributing to malpractice risk
2. Understand the magnitude of adverse events and medical negligence in hospitalized patients
3. State the reasons families offer for filing malpractice claims
4. Describe a system for identifying and intervening with healthcare professionals at risk for claims

Sunday, June 02, 2013 3:15PM - 4:15PM
Department of Global Health (DGH) Research Forum II
Sunday, June 02, 3:15PM - 4:15PM
Presented by:
Amy Levi, CNM, WHNP-BC, PhD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Global Midwifery
Session Description:
Presented in this forum: 1. Side Effect of the antiretroviral therapy (ART) is associated with depression in Chinese HIVPositive Individuals: A Mix Methods Study Wei-Ti ChenRN, CNM, DNSc 2. Family Planning Perspectives of Couples Affected by Sexual and Gender-based violence in Post-conflict Democratic Republic of Congo Nicole Warren, CNM PhD MPH; Nancy Glass; Paul Ramazani 3. Reproductive Health Needs and Preferences of Bhutanese Women Refugee Jane Dyer,CNM, MBA, PhD



Diagnosis and Management of Common Sleep Disorders in Women
Sunday, June 02, 3:15PM - 4:15PM
Presented by:
Jennifer Hensley, EdD, CNM, WHNP, LCCE


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Approximately 10%of the general population, or 15 million women, suffer from a clinically significant sleep disorder that constitutes a health problem. These disorders include: the insomnias, obstructive sleep apnea, Willis-Ekbom Disease/Restless Legs Syndrome, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Lack of restorative sleep can lead to excessive daytime sleepiness causing “sleep attacks” at inappropriate times such as, when driving (causing motor vehicle accidents), being on the job (causing “misses or near-misses”), or operating complex machinery with decreased psychomotor vigilance. Lack of sleep can also lead to anxiety, depression, irritability, cognitive impairment, and poor judgment. When restorative sleep is not adequate, there can the emergence of, or worsening of, medical problems such as diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and heart attacks. As clinicians, it is our responsibility to care for the health needs of our patients. Come find out how you can screen, diagnose, and treat for the most common sleep disorders in women. One question may open Pandora's box: 'Are you satisfied with your sleep?'
Objectives:
1. Discuss the prevalence and consequences of untreated sleep disorders in women across the lifespan: women falling asleep at the wheel with children in the car; accidents at work; irritablity, depression, and anxiety; diabetes, hypertension, heart attacks.
2. Discuss criteria for diagnosis of the four most common sleep disorders in women across the lifespan: the insomnias, excessive daytime sleepiness, obstructive sleep apnea, and Willis-Ekbom Disease/Restless Legs Syndrome.
3. Develop symptom analyses for suspected sleep disorders and choose appropriate screening questionnaire(s) to assist with diagnosis(es).
4. Choose appropriate non-pharmacologic and/or pharmacologic treatments for the diagnosed sleep disorder(s).
5. Determine appropriate follow-up for women with sleep disorders and when to refer.
6. "Help reach Healthy People 2020 goals for sleep:SH–1: Evaluation for obstructive sleep apnea Increase from 25.5% to 28% evaluated SH–2: Vehicular crashes due to drowsy driving Decrease from 2.7 per million to 2.1 per millionSH–3: Sufficient sleep among 9th to 12th graders Increase >8 hours/noc from 30.9 to 33.2% SH–4: Sufficient sleep among adults Increase > 8 hours/ noc from 69.6% to 70.9% 18-21 yo Increase > 7 hours/ noc from 69.6% to 70.9% > 22 yo "



HIV and Pregnancy - Recommendations for Prenatal Care
Sunday, June 02, 3:15PM - 4:15PM
Presented by:
Lavenia Carpenter, MD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
Care of the pregnant patient with HIV infection continues to evolve. The use of current anti-retroviral regimens will significantly lower the risk for mother to child transmission. Recommendations for the antepartum and intrapartum management have been updated as well as the management options for discordant couples.
Objectives:
1. The participant will better understand the role of universal and repeat screening for HIV during pregnancy with reference to state laws.
2. The participant will better understand the use of anti-retrovirals to reduce the mother to child transmission of HIV.
3. The participant will better understand the availability and use of medications for pre-exposure prophylaxis in discordant couples.



In Utero Repair for Myelomeningocele: What Your Patients Would Like to Know
Sunday, June 02, 3:15PM - 4:15PM
Presented by:
Mary Carroll, MD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
In March of 2011, results of the Management of Myelomeningocele Study (MOMS) conducted by the NIH and three university medical centers were published, and in utero repair of myelomeningocele was determined a beneficial treatment. Vanderbilt University was one of the three participating centers, and has since reported on a case series of 28 deliveries between March,2011 and May, 2012. Our fetal surgery team has modified portions of the surgical procedure and postoperative and delivery management from the initial study with the goal of decreasing maternal and neonatal complications. Our results to date demonstrate a reduction in maternal complications and an 81% delivery rate of 34-37 weeks’ gestation.
Objectives:
1. The audience will gain knowledge of the development and history of in utero repair for spina bifida.
2. The presentation of a case study describing preoperative, operative and postoperative management with video accompaniment will provide the audience with a unique perspective of this surgical repair.
3. Summary information and demographics for the 28 delivered patients at VUMC will provide understanding of the current status and progress of this procedure.
4. The audience will gain understanding regarding the impact and outcomes of the surgery from the patient perspective.



National Birth Center Study II: Implications for Practice, Policy, and Research
Sunday, June 02, 3:15PM - 4:15PM
Presented by:
Susan Stapleton , DNP, CNM, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx =
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Midwifery Matters - Public Reception
Session Description:
Report of Findings of the NBCS II and implications for clinical practice, healthcare policy, ongoing data collection, and research. Presented by: Susan Stapleton, DNP, CNM, FACNM; Jill Alliman, CNM, MSN; Cara Osborne, SD, CNM; Brynne Potter, CPM

Sunday, June 02, 2013 4:30PM - 5:30PM
Becoming a Peer Reviewer for a Refereed Journal
Sunday, June 02, 4:30PM - 5:30PM
Presented by:
Patricia Murphy, CNM, DrPH
Frances E. Likis, CNM, NP, DrPH, FACNM
Tekoa King , CNM, MPH
Frances E. Likis, CNM, NP, DrPH, FACNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Education
Session Description:
Peer review is an essential part of the process of assessing the quality and accuracy of manuscripts published in biomedical journals.Peer review is also an important contribution to the profession and a way to learn how to write manuscripts submitted for publication.This presentation presents an overview of the peer review process with an emphasis on components of good reviews. Topics addressed include a review of the literature on efficacy of peer review, essential components of good reviews, and tips for writing constructive comments. Presenters are the editors of the Journal of Midwifery & Women’sHealth.
Objectives:
1. Describe the purpose of peer review.
2. Identify benefits of being a peer reviewer for a referred journal.
3. Recognize critical components of good reviews.
4. Describe methods for writing constructivecritiques.



Challenging Cases in OB Triage
Sunday, June 02, 4:30PM - 5:30PM
Presented by:
Linda Hunter, CNM, EdD


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
Triaging pregnant women in an Emergency Room or OB Triage Units poses unique challenges for midwives working in these areas. At times seemingly 'normal' complaints mask a less common or atypical condition. In a busy clinical setting, identifying these potential 'red herrings' is crucial to preventing poor obstetric outcomes. This session presents several interesting OB triage cases and includes the appropriate management steps and a 'take home' message for each.
Objectives:
1. Describe the appropriate diagnostic work up for a pregnant woman presenting with a common complaint such as abdominal pain, back pain, or nausea/vomiting,
2. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques in pregnancy.
3. Recognize the clinical presentation of SIRS and sepsis.
4. Discuss the maternal and fetal risks associated with emergency delivery.



Evidence-Based Management of the Second Stage of Labor: Getting Everyone on the Same Page
Sunday, June 02, 4:30PM - 5:30PM
Presented by:
Mary Lou Kopas, MN, CNM
Kelly McKittrick, APRN, CNM


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = N/A
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
The phrase 'Physiologic Second Stage' has been used for decades to describe supportive non-intervention in the pushing phase of labor, but what does the latest evidence tell us about various second interventions? How can we support a 'natural' second stage for women with epidurals? Is there a limit to how long we should let mothers push? Is hands-on or hands-poised a better choice for perineal integrity? We will review the evidence--or lack thereof--surround second stage labor care and discuss why we all might be pushing too hard.
Objectives:
1. Identify the potential benefits of the following techniques of second stage care: delayed pushing (laboring down), non-directed pushing, upright positions, perineal support techniques
2. Describe specific situations in which interventions, such as directed pushing, might be indicated during second stage.
3. Describe how epidural anesthesia can affect second stage.
4. Discuss possible implications of time limits for second stage.



Midwifery schedules and night work: New Evidence of shift work and sleep disorders, What's a Midwife to Do?
Sunday, June 02, 4:30PM - 5:30PM
Presented by:
Jennifer Hensley, EdD, CNM, WHNP, LCCE


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
6 million Americans work night-or-rotating shifts, women more than men, and 50-70 million Americans suffer from a sleep or wake disorder. Lack of sleep and decreased alertness have adverse consequences that affect health (breast cancer, diabesity, hypertension), emotional state (depression, irritability), professional performance (decreased psychomotor vigilance), and more. Midwives work night-and-rotating shifts, with successful adjustment from one shift to the next decreasing as we age. Shift work sleep disorder (SWSD), a circadian rhythm disorder, can be identified and treated so the negative consequences of lack of sleep and decreased waking alertness can be mitigated. Wouldn’t you like to know how to help yourself, your colleagues, your practice and your patients? Please come find out.
Objectives:
1. 1.State the prevalence of shift work in the US, circadian rhythm disorders, and shift work sleep disorder (SWSD).
2. 2.Understand the physiology of sleep and pathophysiology of disrupted sleep cycles during night-and-rotating shift work.
3. 3.State the consequences of shift work and SWSD: 'misses' and 'near misses' at work, excessive sleepiness that can lead to poor judgment and falling asleep at the wheel, and personal health risks such as breast cancer, diabetes and hypertension.
4. 4.Identify tools for the screening and diagnosis of SWSD.
5. 5.Compare non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments for SWSD.



Postpartum Hyperthyroidism
Sunday, June 02, 4:30PM - 5:30PM
Presented by:
Ami Goldstein, CNM, FNP


CEUs = 0.1
Rx = 0.1
Fee = $0.00
Student Fee = $0.00
Track Identifiers: Clinical
Session Description:
During the postpartum year, there are major changes in autoimmunity which can impact on endocrine function. Women with a history of hyperthyroidism may have a worsening of symptoms during this time. Elevation in thyroid hormone can mark the onset of new endocrine disease as well. Presentation may mimic normal changes in the postpartum period. Diagnosis depends on an alert provider and management can be initiated in the midwifery office.
Objectives:
1. Identify signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism during the postpartum period.
2. Describe the different lab results for the diagnosis of postpartum thyroiditis, Graves Disease and Hashimoto's.
3. Demonstrate medication management of the hyperthyroid period of postpartum thyroiditis.
4. Describe appropriate medication for Graves Disease for a breastfeeding woman.
5. Discuss the possible impact of thyroid disease on milk supply and quality for the lactating woman.
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